Charles Moore, 1st Earl of Charleville

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Charles Moore, 1st Earl of Charleville PC (24 January 1712 – 17 February 1764), known as The Lord Moore between 1725 and 1758, was an Irish peer and freemason.

Moore [1] was the son of John Moore, 1st Baron Moore, and Mary Lum, daughter of Elnathan Lum. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and succeeded his father in the barony in 1725. [2] [ unreliable source? ] He was sworn of the Irish Privy Council in 1746 [2] [ unreliable source? ] [3] and created Earl of Charleville, in the King's County, in the Irish peerage in 1758. [4] From 1761 to 1764 he was Governor and Custos Rotulorum of King's County. [2] [ unreliable source? ]

Lord Charleville married Hester Coghill, daughter of James Coghill, in 1737. The marriage was childless. He died in February 1764, aged 51, when the barony and earldom became extinct. He left his estates to his nephew John Bury, whose son Charles was created Earl of Charleville in 1806. Lady Charleville married Sir John Cogill, 1st Baronet. She died in July 1789. [2] [ unreliable source? ]

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References

  1. "Charles Moore 1st and last Earl of Charleville". geni.com.
  2. 1 2 3 4 thepeerage.com Charles Moore, 1st and last Earl of Charleville
  3. leighrayment.com Privy Counsellors - Ireland [Usurped!]
  4. "No. 9813". The London Gazette . 29 July 1758. p. 2.
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Earl of Charleville
17581764
Extinct
Preceded by Baron Moore
17251764