Charles O. Jenkins

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Charles O. Jenkins
Charles O. Jenkins.png
Jenkins pictured in Quarter-century Record, Class of 1894 Yale College
Biographical details
Born(1872-05-28)May 28, 1872
Cleveland, Ohio
DiedAugust 30, 1952(1952-08-30) (aged 80)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1894–1896 Western Reserve
1901 North Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall19–9–5

Charles Orlando Jenkins (May 28, 1872 – August 30, 1952) was an American football coach, lawyer, and shipbuilder. He served as the head football coach at Western Reserve University from 1894 to 1896 and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1901, compiling a career college football record of 19–9–5. [1]

Contents

Jenkins was born on May 28, 1872 in Cleveland, Ohio. He attended Central High School in Cleveland and spent a year at Harvard University before moving on Yale University, from which he graduated in 1894. Jenkins was a substitute on the Yale Bulldogs football team, playing as a tackle. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1901. After he graduated from Harvard, Jenkins formed a law practice with Roger M. Lee under the name of Lee and Jenkins, which focused on admiralty law. He later ran the Jenkins Steamship Company, which built and operated steel freight steamers. [2] Jenkins died in 1952. [3]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Western Reserve (Independent)(1894–1896)
1894 Western Reserve 7–0
1895 Western Reserve2–4–1
1896 Western Reserve3–3–2
Western Reserve:12–7–3
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1901)
1901 North Carolina 7–22–1
North Carolina:7–22–1
Total:19–9–5

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References

  1. "Coach Charles Jenkins". University Archives. Case Western Reserve University . Retrieved December 16, 2015.
  2. "Quarter-century Record, Class of 1894 Yale College". Yale University. 1922. pp. 228–9. Retrieved December 15, 2015.
  3. "Deaths Elsewhere". Dayton Daily News . Dayton, Ohio. Associated Press. September 1, 1952. p. 29. Retrieved September 16, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .