Charles Rees Award

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Charles Rees Award
Awarded forTo reward excellence in the field of heterocyclic chemistry
Sponsored byRoyal Society of Chemistry
Date2008 (2008)
Reward(s)£2000
Website www.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Awards/CharlesReesAward/

The Charles Rees Award is granted by the Royal Society of Chemistry to "reward excellence in the field of heterocyclic chemistry". It was established in 2008 and is awarded biennially. The winner receives £2000, a medal and a certificate, and delivers a lecture at the Lakeland Symposium, Grasmere, UK. Winners are chosen by the Heterocyclic and Synthesis Group, overseen by the Organic Division Awards Committee. [1]

Contents

Previous winners

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry

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References

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