Charles Stanhope (1673–1760)

Last updated

Charles Stanhope (1673–1760) was an English barrister and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1717 to 1741. Deeply implicated in transactions related to the South Sea Bubble, possibly concerned with political corruption, he was strongly defended by those in government, and was acquitted of all charges brought against him. [1]

Contents

Early life

Elvaston Castle, Derbyshire today - the Stanhope family seat as rebuilt c.1817 Elvaston Castle - geograph.org.uk - 6393.jpg
Elvaston Castle, Derbyshire today - the Stanhope family seat as rebuilt c.1817

Stanhope was the second son of John Stanhope of Elvaston, Derbyshire, and his wife Dorothy Agard, daughter of Charles Agard of Foston, Derbyshire. He was admitted at the Inner Temple and was called to the bar in 1703. He succeeded his elder brother Thomas to the family estates in 1730. [1]

Elvaston, Derbyshire village and civil parish in South Derbyshire District, Derbyshire, England

Elvaston is a small village and civil parish in Derbyshire, England. The parish also includes two hamlets, Ambaston and Thulston, and a modern housing estate, Boulton Moor. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 Census was 1,801. Located to the south-east of Derby, Elvaston itself is dominated by Elvaston Castle, a country house which is currently in the ownership of Derbyshire County Council, who plan to lease the site to a private company. The move has proved controversial, attracting a petition of 60,000 signatures against the proposals collected by the Elvaston Castle Estate Trust, who want to keep the site in public ownership. At the present time the Castle is rarely open to the public and has been somewhat neglected, while the grounds are open throughout the summer.

Inner Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Career

Stanhope was the cousin of James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope who made him his under-secretary in 1714. He stood for Parliament at Milborne Port in a by-election on 10 June 1717, and though initially defeated, he was seated on petition as Member of Parliament on 6 July 1717. He served as Secretary to the Treasury from 1717 to 1721. James Stanhope and Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland were investigated over dealings in South Sea Company stock after the Bubble, and Charles Stanhope also; but he avoided the ruin of political career that came upon Sunderland. [1]

James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope British Army general

James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope was a British statesman and soldier who effectively served as Chief Minister between 1717 and 1721.

Milborne Port is a former parliamentary borough located in Somerset. It elected two members to the unreformed House of Commons between 1298 and 1307 and again from 1628, but was disenfranchised in the Reform Act 1832 as a rotten borough.

In the United Kingdom, there are several Secretaries to the Treasury, who are Treasury ministers nominally acting as secretaries to HM Treasury. The origins of the office are unclear, although it probably originated during Lord Burghley's tenure as Lord Treasurer in the 16th century. The number of secretaries was expanded to two by 1714 at the latest. The Treasury ministers together discharge all the former functions of the Lord Treasurer, which are nowadays nominally vested in the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Of the Commissioners, only the Second Lord of the Treasury, who is also the Chancellor of the Exchequer, is a Treasury minister.

At the 1722 general election Stanhope was given the safe seat of Aldborough by the Duke of Newcastle, being returned unopposed then and at the 1727 general election. Stanhope was seeking procurement, but the new King George II discovered among his father's papers a note written by Stanhope with proposals for drastic action against him during a family quarrel. The King blocked any favours towards Stanhope, but Stanhope attributed his failure to secure office to Walpole and became his bitter enemy. While he owed his seat to Newcastle, he supported the government in all divisions except on the civil list arrears in 1729. At the 1734 general election he was elected in a contest as MP for Harwich on his own interest, and went over to the Opposition. He did not stand in 1741. [1]

Aldborough was a parliamentary borough located in the West Riding of Yorkshire, abolished in the Great Reform Act of 1832.

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle Prime Minister of Great Britain

Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne and 1st Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyme, was a British Whig statesman, whose official life extended throughout the Whig supremacy of the 18th century. He is commonly known as the Duke of Newcastle.

Harwich (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Harwich was a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Until its abolition for the 2010 general election it elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Stanhope became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1726. [2]

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

Death and legacy

Stanhope died unmarried in 1760. His younger brother was William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington, the father of William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington.

William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington British politician

William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington, PC was a British statesman and diplomat.

William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington British Army general

General William Stanhope, 2nd Earl of Harrington was a British politician and soldier.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Stanhope, Charles (1673–1760), of Elvaston, Derbys., History of Parliament Online" . Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  2. Thomas Thomson (1812). History of the Royal Society: From Its Institution to the End of the Eighteenth Century. R. Baldwin. p. xxxvi.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Michael Harvey
James Medlycott
Member of Parliament for Milborne Port
1717–1722
With: James Medlycott
Succeeded by
Michael Harvey
George Speke
Preceded by
William Monson
William Jessop
Member of Parliament for Aldborough
17221734
With: William Jessop
Succeeded by
Henry Pelham
William Jessop
Preceded by
Sir Philip Parker-a-Morley-Long, Bt
John Perceval
Member of Parliament for Harwich
17341741
With: Carteret Leathes
Succeeded by
John Phillipson
Hill Mussenden


Related Research Articles

Robert Walpole British statesman

Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford,, known between 1725 and 1742 as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Earl of Chesterfield

Earl of Chesterfield, in the County of Derby, was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1628 for Philip Stanhope, 1st Baron Stanhope. He had already been created Baron Stanhope, of Shelford in the County of Nottingham, in 1616, also in the Peerage of England. Stanhope's youngest son the Hon. Alexander Stanhope was the father of James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope while his half-brother Sir John Stanhope of Elvaston was the great-grandfather of William Stanhope, 1st Earl of Harrington.

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire British nobleman and Whig politician

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire, was a British nobleman and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1721 to 1729 when he inherited the Dukedom.

Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland English statesman and nobleman from the Spencer family

Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland, KG, PC, known as Lord Spencer from 1688 to 1702, was an English statesman and nobleman from the Spencer family. He served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1714–1717), Lord Privy Seal (1715–1716), Lord President of the Council (1717–1719) and First Lord of the Treasury (1718–1721). He is the 5th paternal great grandfather of Winston Churchill and the 6th paternal great grandfather of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend British Whig statesman

Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend, was an English Whig statesman. He served for a decade as Secretary of State for the Northern Department, 1714–1717, 1721–1730. He directed British foreign policy in close collaboration with his brother-in-law, prime minister Robert Walpole. He was often known as Turnip Townshend because of his strong interest in farming turnips and his role in the British Agricultural Revolution.

Earl of Harrington

Earl of Harrington is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain that was created in 1742.

Earl Stanhope was a title in the Peerage of Great Britain (1718–1967).

Elvaston Castle historic stately home in Elvaston, Derbyshire, England

Elvaston Castle is a stately home in Elvaston, Derbyshire, England. The Gothic Revival castle and surrounding parkland is run and owned by Derbyshire County Council as a country park known as, Elvaston Castle Country Park. The country park has 200 acres (0.81 km2) of woodlands, parkland and formal gardens.

Charles Stanhope, 8th Earl of Harrington British peer and polo player

Charles Augustus Stanhope, 8th Earl of Harrington, known as Viscount Petersham from 1866 to 1881, was a British peer and successful polo player.

Charles Stanhope may refer to:

Sir John Stanhope was an English knight and landowner, and father of Philip Stanhope, 1st Earl of Chesterfield.

Gentleman of the Bedchamber was a title in the royal household of the Kingdom of England from the 11th century, later used also in the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Charles Stanhope, 4th Earl of Harrington British Army officer and peer

Major-General Charles Stanhope, 4th Earl of Harrington, styled Viscount Petersham until 1829, was an English peer and man of fashion.

William Henry Leicester Stanhope, 11th Earl of Harrington was a British army captain and peer.

John Wallop, 1st Earl of Portsmouth, of Hurstbourne Park, near Whitchurch and Farleigh Wallop, Hampshire, known as John Wallop, 1st Viscount Lymington from 1720 to 1743, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1715 to 1720, when he vacated his seat on being raised to the peerage as Viscount Lymington and Baron Wallop.

5th Parliament of Great Britain

The 5th Parliament of Great Britain was summoned by George I of Great Britain on 17 January 1715 and assembled on the 17 March 1715. When it was dissolved on 10 March 1722 it had been the first Parliament to be held under the Septennial Act of 1716.

Thomas Pelham (c.1678–1759) was an English politician, a member of the Pelham family of Sussex. Returned on the family's electoral interest at Lewes in 1705, he provided a reliable Whig vote in the House of Commons, and a rather more sporadic attendance on the Board of Trade. Due to his neglect of the family electoral interest, he was nearly turned out in the 1734 election, and stood down in favor of his eldest son at the next election in 1741.