Charles Tiebout

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Charles M. Tiebout
Born(1924-10-12)October 12, 1924
Norwalk, Connecticut, United States
DiedJanuary 16, 1968(1968-01-16) (aged 43)
Citizenship American
Alma mater Wesleyan University
University of Michigan (PhD)
Known for Tiebout model
Scientific career
Fields Economic geography, Regional economics, Public economics
Institutions Northwestern
UCLA
University of Washington
Doctoral advisor Daniel Suits

Charles Mills Tiebout (1924–1968) was an economist and geographer most known for his development of the Tiebout model, which suggested that there were actually non-political solutions to the free rider problem in local governance. He earned undisputable recognition in the area of local government and fiscal federalism with his widely cited paper “A pure theory of local expenditures”. [1] He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1950, and received a PhD in economics in University of Michigan in 1957. He was Professor of Economics and Geography at the University of Washington. He died suddenly on January 16, 1968, at age 43.

Contents

Tiebout is frequently associated with the concept of foot voting, that is, physically moving to another jurisdiction where policies are closer to one's ideologies, instead of voting to change a government or its policies.

Major publications

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References

  1. Caves, R. W. (2004). Encyclopedia of the City. Routledge. p. 670. ISBN   978-0415862875.