Charlie Pollard

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Charles Pollard
Personal information
Full nameCharles Arthur Pollard
Born27 August 1897
Wakefield, England
Died1 October 1968 (aged 71)
Wakefield, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight11 st 8 lb (73 kg)
Position Fullback, Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1919–32 Wakefield Trinity 3853965401425
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Yorkshire
1924 Great Britain 10000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
193539 Batley
Source: [1]

Charles "Charlie" Arthur Pollard (27 August 1897 [2] – 1 October 1968) [3] was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1910s, 1920s and 1930s, and coached in the 1930s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 236) (captain), as a fullback , wing, or centre, i.e. number 1, 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4, [1] and coached at club level for Batley.

Contents

Background

Charlie Pollard was born in Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he died aged 71 in Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

International honours

Charlie Pollard won a cap for Great Britain while at Wakefield Trinity, he played fullback in Great Britain's 11-13 defeat by New Zealand in the 2nd test match at Basin Reserve, Wellington on Wednesday 6 August 1924. [1]

County honours

Charlie Pollard won cap(s) for Yorkshire while at Wakefield Trinity.

County Cup Final appearances

Charlie Pollard played right wing. i.e. number 2, in Wakefield Trinity's 9–8 victory over Batley in the 1924–25 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1924–25 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 22 November 1924, and played left wing, i.e. number 5, in the 3–10 defeat by Huddersfield in the 1926–27 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1926–27 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Wednesday 1 December 1926, the original match on Saturday 27 November 1926 was postponed due to fog.

Notable tour matches

Charlie Pollard played fullback in Wakefield Trinity's 3–29 defeat by Australia in the 1921–22 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain match at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 22 October 1921. [4]

Club career

Charlie Pollard made his début for Wakefield Trinity during August 1919, he played his last match for Wakefield Trinity during December 1932, he appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored. In addition, prior to the 1949–50 season, the archaic field-goal was also still a valid means of scoring points.

Testimonial match

Charlie Pollard's Testimonial match for Wakefield Trinity was the 8–7 victory over Leeds at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 19 March 1927. [5] [6]

Coaching career

Club career

Charlie Pollard was the coach of Batley from July 1935 to March 1939.

Genealogical Information

Charlie Pollard's marriage to Nora Gwendoline (née Brownhill) (birth registered during third ¼ 1905 in Wort ley district) was registered during second ¼ 1926 in Wakefield district. [7] They had 3 children; the rugby league footballer Roy Pollard; Oxford University RFC, Wakefield RFC, Colwyn Bay RFC and North Wales rugby (captain) rugby union footballer David Pollard (birth registered during fourth ¼ 1929 in Wakefield district); and Barbara M. Pollard (birth registered during third ¼ 1932 in Wakefield district), Charles was the older brother of the rugby league footballer; Ernest Pollard, the Wakefield Trinity fullback of the 1930s; Lionel Pollard (birth registered during first ¼ 1913 in Wakefield district), Frank Pollard (birth registered during first ¼ 1914 in Wakefield district), Donald Pollard (birth registered during second ¼ 1916 in Wakefield district), and Wilfred Pollard (birth registered during second ¼ 1917 in Wakefield district), and was the uncle of the Wakefield RFC rugby union footballer from 1956 to 1958; Anthony Pollard (birth registered during third ¼ 1935 in Wakefield district).

Outside rugby league

Charlie Pollard was the Landlord of the Graziers' Hotel, Belle Vue, Wakefield c.1920. [8]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. "Death details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  4. Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC – FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9
  5. Wakefield Trinity Committee, 7 Tammy Hall Street, Wakefield (Saturday 19 March 1927). Wakefield Trinity Gazette. John Lindley, Ltd., Printers, 8 Thompson's Yard, Westgate, Wakefield. ISBN n/a
  6. "Wakefield Trinity v Leeds Match Programme". Wakefield Trinity. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 3 July 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  7. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. Wakefield Trinity Committee, 7 Tammy Hall Street, Wakefield (Saturday 13 November 1920). Wakefield Trinity Gazette. John Fletcher Printers, Albion Court, Westgate, Wakefield, WF1 1BD. ISBN n/a