Charlie Sumner

Last updated
Charlie Sumner
No. 26
Position: Safety
Personal information
Born:(1930-10-19)October 19, 1930
Radford, Virginia
Died:April 3, 2015(2015-04-03) (aged 84)
Maui, Hawaii
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:194 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school: Dublin (VA)
College: William & Mary
NFL Draft: 1954  / Round: 22 / Pick: 258
Career history
As a player:
As a coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:73
Interceptions:21
Player stats at PFR
Coaching stats at PFR

Charles Edward Sumner (October 19, 1930 – April 3, 2015) was an American football player who was selected by the Chicago Bears in the 22nd round of the 1954 NFL Draft. A 6'1", 194 lbs. safety from the College of William & Mary, Sumner played in eight National Football League (NFL) seasons, from 1955 to 1962. He later was an assistant coach in the NFL for many years, including three stints with the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders.

Sumner's only head coaching stint was with the Oakland Invaders of the United States Football League (USFL) in 1985. That year, he led the Invaders, a club that featured future NFL stars Anthony Carter, Bobby Hebert, Ray Bentley and Gary Plummer, to the USFL Championship Game. The 1985 USFL Championship game was the last game the league ever played. The Invaders lost to the Baltimore Stars, 28–24, at Giants Stadium.

Sumner was born in Radford, Virginia. He was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. He died in Maui, Hawaii on April 6, 2015. [1]

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References

  1. Jerry McDonald: Former Raiders coach Charlie Sumner, architect of Super Bowl XVIII touchdown, dies in Maui at age 84. Obituary on ibabuzz.com, 6 April 2015, retrieved 7 April 2015.