Charlie Waller (American football)

Last updated
Charlie Waller
Personal information
Born:(1921-11-26)November 26, 1921
Griffin, Georgia
Died:September 5, 2009(2009-09-05) (aged 87)
Baker, Florida
Career information
College: Oglethorpe
Career history
As coach:
Head coaching record
Regular season:9–7–3 (.553)
Postseason:0–0 (–)
Career:9–7–3 (.553)
Coaching stats at PFR

Charlie F. Waller (November 26, 1921 – September 5, 2009) was an American Professional Football head coach for the San Diego Chargers from 1969, the last season of the American Football League, to 1970, the first season of the merged National Football League. [2] His total coaching record at the end of his career was 9 wins, 7 losses and 3 ties. [3] Waller was offensive backfield coach and took over for Chargers head coach Sid Gillman on November 14, 1969 after Gillman's resignation due to poor health, Gilman remained as general manager. After Gillman's health improved he was named Charger head coach on December 30, 1970 and Waller offensive coach. He is a 1942 graduate of Oglethorpe University and a 1980 inductee in its Athletic Hall of Fame. He was head football coach at Decatur, Georgia High School in the 1940s. In 1951, he joined Ralph Jordan's staff as offensive backfield coach at Auburn University. [4] [5]

Waller was later an assistant coach for George Allen and the Washington Redskins.

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References

  1. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nwfdailynews/obituary.aspx?pid=132507769
  2. Charlie Waller NFL Coaching Record - databaseFootball.com Archived 2010-02-19 at the Wayback Machine
  3. Chargers.com - History » Coaches Archived May 9, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  4. "Baker: Retired pro football coach dies at 87". Archived from the original on 2011-07-27.
  5. "Longtime football coach Charlie Waller dies".