Chasong County

Last updated
Chasong County
자성군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja慈城郡
  McCune-ReischauerChasŏng kun
  Revised RomanizationJaseong-gun
DPRK2006 Chagang-Chasong.PNG
Map of Chagang showing the location of Chasong
Country North Korea
Province Chagang Province
Population (est.)
  Total8,317

Chasŏng County is a county (kun) in Chagang Province, North Korea. The city is immediately south of the Chinese-North Korean border. Its approximate population to 7 km from the city center is 8,317. The average altitude is 1279 feet, or 389 meters. Nearby cities and towns include Haengjangp'yong and Umnae-dong.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

China State in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Contents

Administrative divisions

Chasŏng County is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 1 rodongjagu (workers' district) and 15 ri (villages):

  • Chasŏng-ŭp
  • Unbong-rodongjagu
  • Chajang-ri
  • Horye-ri
  • Kujungyŏng-ri
  • Kwanp'yŏng-ri
  • Kwi'il-li
  • Pŏptong-ri
  • Ryangdŏng-ri
  • Ryusam-ri
  • Samgŏ-ri
  • Sangp'yŏng-ri
  • Sinp'ung-ri
  • Song'am-ri
  • Taenam-ri
  • Yŏksu-ri
  • Yŏnp'ung-ri

Sources

    Korean language Language spoken in Korea

    The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 80 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each territory. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. Historical and modern linguists classify Korean as a language isolate; however, it does have a few extinct relatives, which together with Korean itself and the Jeju language form the Koreanic language family. This implies that Korean is not an isolate, but a member of a micro-family. The idea that Korean belongs to the controversial Altaic language family is discredited in academic research. Korean is agglutinative in its morphology and SOV in its syntax.

    Coordinates: 41°27′39″N126°38′29″E / 41.4608°N 126.6414°E / 41.4608; 126.6414

    Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

    A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.


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