Cheers (season 9)

Last updated
Cheers
Season 9
Cheers season 9.jpg
Region 1 DVD
Starring Ted Danson
Kirstie Alley
Rhea Perlman
John Ratzenberger
Woody Harrelson
Kelsey Grammer
George Wendt
Country of originUnited States
No. of episodes27
Release
Original network NBC
Original releaseSeptember 20, 1990 (1990-09-20) 
May 3, 1991 (1991-05-03)
Season chronology
 Previous
Season 8
Next 
Season 10
List of Cheers episodes

The ninth season of Cheers , an American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 20, 1990, and May 3, 1991. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Contents

Background

Cheers is a sitcom that started in 1982. After originally having low ratings for its first season the show became a part of mainstream culture. The sitcom is set in a Boston bar which Sam Malone, a retired baseball pitcher, owns. He, along with cocktail waitress Carla Tortelli, bartender Woody Boyd, and manager Rebecca Howe, work at the bar and deal with the patrons of the bar Norm Peterson, Cliff Clavin, and Frasier Crane. The sitcom was part of NBC's "Must See TV" Thursday night lineup.

Cast and characters

Recurring characters

Season synopsis

Episodes

No.
overall
No. in
season
TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal air dateU.S. viewers
(millions)
1951"Love Is a Really, Really, Perfectly Okay Thing" James Burrows Phoef Sutton September 20, 1990 (1990-09-20)32.9 [1]
After Sam and Rebecca spend the night together, it turns out to be harder to brag about it than originally thought.
1962"Cheers Fouls Out"James BurrowsLarry BalmagiaSeptember 27, 1990 (1990-09-27)28.4 [2]

In an attempt to beat Gary's Olde Towne Tavern in an annual employee basketball game, Cheers acquires Boston Celtic Kevin McHale by insisting the game is for charity.


Although not formally titled as such, this episode is also known as "Bar Wars IV". "Bar Wars III" was aired the previous season; the episodic numbering of "Bar Wars" segments would resume with "Bar Wars V" in season 10.
1973"Rebecca Redux"James BurrowsStory by: Bill Steinkellner
Teleplay by: Phoef Sutton, Bill Steinkellner and Cheri Eichen
October 4, 1990 (1990-10-04)30.4 [3]
Sam hires a new manager (Bryan Clark) that everyone takes a liking to, while Rebecca accepts a new job that is slightly less-than-perfect.
1984"Where Nobody Knows Your Name" Andy Ackerman Dan O'Shannon and Tom AndersonOctober 11, 1990 (1990-10-11)32.9 [4]
Rebecca becomes upset when one of Robin's past lovers claims to be having an affair with him.
1995"Ma Always Liked You Best"Andy AckermanDan O'Shannon and Tom AndersonOctober 18, 1990 (1990-10-18)31.7 [5]
Cliff's mom begins to take a liking to Woody, much to Cliff's chagrin. Meanwhile, Norm gets caught in one of the bar's windows.
2006"Grease"James BurrowsBrian Pollack and Mert RichOctober 25, 1990 (1990-10-25)29.9 [6]
Norm attempts to save the Hungry Heifer after it makes the decision to close its doors. Cliff's mother moves in with Woody against Cliff's attempts to deter her. Robin is sentenced to community service picking up refuse along the highway which lends its way to Sam's persistent mocking of Rebecca.
2017"Breaking In Is Hard to Do"Andy Ackerman Ken Levine and David Isaacs November 1, 1990 (1990-11-01)33.2 [7]
Frasier and Lilith debate over who should stay home and take care of Frederick. In the end, Frasier takes the boy to spend the day at the bar, which angers Lilith until Frederick speaks his first word: "Norm!" Carla helps Rebecca sneak into prison to visit Robin in an attempt to seduce him.
202
203
8
9
"Cheers 200th Anniversary Special"
James Burrows and Andy AckermanCheri Eichen, Bill Steinkellner and Phoef SuttonNovember 8, 1990 (1990-11-08)45.9 [8]
A special recap of the first 199 episodes of Cheers, hosted by John McLaughlin, includes discussions with the cast (including former cast member Shelley Long), writers and directors of the series.
20410"Bad Neighbor Sam"James BurrowsCheri Eichen and Bill SteinkellnerNovember 15, 1990 (1990-11-15)34.1 [9]
The new owner of Melville's restaurant, John Allen Hill, turns out to be a stickler for the rules. After Sam prevents Melville's customers from using the staircase between Cheers and the restaurant, Hill has Sam's car towed and then locks the pool room and toilets behind a brick wall until Sam agrees to pay rent for them.
20511"Veggie-Boyd"James Burrows Dan Staley and Rob Long November 22, 1990 (1990-11-22)29.1 [10]
Woody is nervous about being able to act the part of a bartender in a commercial while Cliff is upset because of the attention that new trivia napkins in the bar are getting. When Woody discovers that he hates the product that he endorsed in the commercial, it is up to Frasier to help him.
20612"Norm and Cliff's Excellent Adventure"James BurrowsKen Levine and David IsaacsDecember 6, 1990 (1990-12-06)32.7 [11]

Woody discovers the shopping channel and becomes hooked. Norm and Cliff go too far when they start a fight between Sam and Frasier.


NOTE: This episode is dedicated to Al Rosen who played Al in the show.
20713"Woody Interruptus"James BurrowsDan Staley and Rob LongDecember 13, 1990 (1990-12-13)33.8 [12]

Kelly brings Henrí (Anthony Cistaro) with her to Boston after a trip to France. Unbeknownst to her, his plan is to steal her away from Woody, who in turn becomes jealous and worried. Sam suggests a motel to improve Woody and Kelly's relationship. Later, Woody takes Kelly out to a cheap motel for their evening together. However, Carla arrives to stop them from doing it in the motel and tells them that making out in a cheap motel is a bad idea and bad luck for their precious love. Therefore, the couple decide to save their moment for the right time, while Carla brings in and tries to seduce Henrí. Meanwhile, Cliff tells his friends that he plans to freeze his head after death, but they mock him and his plans. Therefore, Cliff and Frasier pull a prank on the other patrons by bringing a box of apparently a frozen head to the bar, which turn out to be only a microcassette in a metal box. In the end, Norm and Paul pull a prank on Cliff, walking through the bar apparently decapitated.


This episode marks Anthony Cistaro's first appearance as recurring character Henrí. [13]
Awards: Outstanding Directing - Comedy Series (Emmy Awards, 1991); [14] Outstanding Directing - Comedy Series (Directors Guild of America Awards, 1990) [15]
20814"Honor Thy Mother"James BurrowsBrian Pollack and Mert RichJanuary 3, 1991 (1991-01-03)38.6 [16]
Carla refuses to carry out the family tradition of naming one of her children after two different grandparents, as it would result in her son becoming Benito Mussolini. Woody gets Cheers featured in a free coupon booklet, with John Hill taking advantage of it by "buying" a round of drinks for everyone in the bar, using the coupons to pay.
20915"Achilles Hill"Andy AckermanKen Levine and David IsaacsJanuary 10, 1991 (1991-01-10)36.3 [17]
Woody finds a foosball table that Carla believes is evil and brings it into the bar. Sam begins dating Hill's daughter to get back at Hill. Guest star: Valerie Mahaffey
21016"The Days of Wine and Neuroses"James BurrowsBrian Pollack and Mert RichJanuary 24, 1991 (1991-01-24)32.3 [18]
Robin Colcord proposes to Rebecca shortly before he is released from prison but Rebecca responds by getting drunk because she has doubts. Frasier becomes obsessed with the Karaoke machine that is replacing the jukebox while it is away being repaired.
21117"Wedding Bell Blues"James BurrowsDan O'Shannon and Tom AndersonJanuary 31, 1991 (1991-01-31)32.7 [19]
On the morning of her wedding, Rebecca seems to have forgotten her doubts and decides to go ahead with the wedding. After she finally realizes that she only loved Robin for his money he leaves, with $6 million that he had hidden in a money belt that was attached to the underside of Rebecca's desk drawer. Guest appearance by Bobby Hatfield of The Righteous Brothers.
21218"I'm Getting My Act Together and Sticking It in Your Face"Andy AckermanDan Staley and Rob LongFebruary 7, 1991 (1991-02-07)31.5 [20]
Two days after the aborted wedding, Rebecca is still locked in Cheers' office. She leaves town but later returns. When she does, Sam thinks she's coming back to say she loves him, and thus activates his "Plan Z" to avoid becoming a "wussy little fraidy cat."
21319"Sam Time Next Year"James BurrowsLarry BalmagiaFebruary 14, 1991 (1991-02-14)31.9 [21]
Sam has a date with an old valentine, played by Barbara Feldon, but throws his back out when he slips down the stairs outside Cheers. Guest appearance by Michael Dukakis.
21420"Crash of the Titans"James BurrowsDan Staley and Rob LongFebruary 21, 1991 (1991-02-21)33.3 [22]
Sam and Rebecca both try to buy the bar's pool room and toilets from John Allen Hill.
21521"It's a Wonderful Wife"James BurrowsSue HerringFebruary 28, 1991 (1991-02-28)35.9 [23]
Vera is fired and Rebecca gets her a job as the hat check girl at Melville's so Norm decides to look for a new bar. Lilith has professional photos taken of herself to give to Frasier for his birthday.
21622"Cheers Has Chili"Andy AckermanCheri Eichen, Bill Steinkellner and Phoef SuttonMarch 14, 1991 (1991-03-14)30.3 [24]
While Sam is away, Rebecca turns the pool room into a tea room, much to Sam's annoyance. He makes a deal with Rebecca; if she can't make $500 in one day from the tea room, he'll get the pool room back. It looks like Sam will get the pool room back, until Rebecca starts selling chili made by Woody.
21723"Carla Loves Clavin"James BurrowsDan Staley and Rob LongMarch 21, 1991 (1991-03-21)28.8 [25]
The "Miss Boston Barmaid" contest is being held at Cheers and Sam is upset because the rules have changed. Carla enters as the prize is a new car. She wonders if her effort is worth it when she finds that Cliff Clavin is one of the judges. Meanwhile, Rebecca hires Norm to paint Sam's office.
21824"Pitch It Again, Sam"James BurrowsDan O'Shannon and Tom AndersonMarch 28, 1991 (1991-03-28)30.8 [26]
Sam is invited to pitch to an old nemesis at Yankee Stadium. Meanwhile, Woody finds a dog and becomes attached to it.
21925"Rat Girl"James BurrowsKen Levine and David IsaacsApril 4, 1991 (1991-04-04)33.4 [27]
Sam strikes out with a girl who apparently prefers Paul to him, Rebecca goes on a healthy eating kick and Lilith has an unhealthy obsession with her dead lab rat, "Whitey".
22026"Home Malone"Andy AckermanDan O'Shannon and Tom AndersonApril 25, 1991 (1991-04-25)27.7 [28]
Kelly needs a job so Rebecca lets her work in the bar. Sam baby-sits Frasier and Lilith's son Frederick, which is not as easy as it seems.
22127"Uncle Sam Wants You"James BurrowsDan Staley and Rob LongMay 2, 1991 (1991-05-02)31.3 [29]
Sam becomes obsessed with Frederick and starts to wonder if it is time he became a father. Elvis: Pete Willcox

Accolades

In the 43rd Primetime Emmy Awards (1991), this season won four Emmys: Outstanding Comedy Series of 1990–1991, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series (Kirstie Alley), Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series (Bebe Neuwirth), and Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series (James Burrows). [30]

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