Chiang Ching-kuo

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The first question is the succession to the presidency. This sort of question only exists in despotic and totalitarian countries. It does not exist in the Republic of China, based on the Constitution. So the next President will be elected in accordance with constitutional procedure by the National Assembly on behalf of the people. Some people may raise the question whether any member of my family would run for the next presidency. My answer is: it can't be and it won't be. [32]

Chiang Wei-kuo, Chiang's younger brother, would later repudiate the declaration in 1990 after he was selected as a vice-presidential candidate. [33]

On 15 July 1987, Chiang finally ended martial law and allowed family visits to the mainland. His administration saw a gradual loosening of political controls and opponents of the Nationalists were no longer forbidden to hold meetings or publish political criticism papers.[ citation needed ]

Opposition political parties, though still formally illegal, were allowed to operate without harassment or arrest. When the Democratic Progressive Party was established on 28 September 1986, President Chiang decided against dissolving the group or persecuting its leaders, but its candidates officially ran in elections as independents in the Tangwai movement.[ citation needed ]

Death and legacy

Chiang Ching-kuo
蔣經國
ChiangChingkuo photo.jpg
Chiang Ching-kuo
President of the Republic of China
In office
20 May 1978 13 January 1988
Chiang Ching-kuo lies in state. Chiang Ching Kuo Funeral.jpg
Chiang Ching-kuo lies in state.

Chiang Ching-kuo died in Taipei in 1988, aged 77, from heart failure and hemorrhage. He was interred temporarily in Daxi Township, Taoyuan County (now Daxi District, Taoyuan City), but in a separate mausoleum in Touliao, a mile down the road from his father's burial place. The hope was to have both buried at their birthplace in Fenghua once mainland China was recovered. Chinese music composer Hwang Yau-tai or Huang Youdi, Huang Yu-ti (黃友棣) wrote the Chiang Ching-kuo Memorial Song in 1988.

In January 2004, Chiang Fang-liang asked that both father and son be buried at Wuchih Mountain Military Cemetery in Hsichih, Taipei County (now New Taipei City). The state funeral ceremony was initially planned for Spring 2005, but was eventually delayed to winter 2005. It may be further delayed due to the recent death of Chiang Ching-kuo's oldest daughter-in-law, who had served as the de facto head of the household since Chiang Fang-liang's death in 2004. Chiang Fang-liang and Soong Mei-ling had agreed in 1997 that the former leaders be first buried, but still be moved to mainland China.[ citation needed ]

Murray A. Rubinstein called Chiang Ching-kuo more of a civilian leader than his father, whom Rubenstein refers to as a "quasi-warlord." [34]

Memorials

Statue of Chiang Ching-kuo in Dongyin Township, Lienchiang County (Matsu Islands) Chiang Ching-kuo Statue in Dongyin Township 28957251333 32a4795c88 o.jpg
Statue of Chiang Ching-kuo in Dongyin Township, Lienchiang County (Matsu Islands)
Ching-kuo Memorial Hall in Nangan Township, Lienchiang County (Matsu Islands) 2014-04-07 Jing Guo Xian Sheng Ji Nian Tang .jpg
Ching-kuo Memorial Hall in Nangan Township, Lienchiang County (Matsu Islands)

Road names

The Republic of China Air Force

The AIDC, the ROC's air defense company, has nicknamed its AIDC F-CK Indigenous Defense Fighter the Ching Kuo in his memory.[ citation needed ]

Coin

Song

Family

Family of Chiang Ching-kuo. From left to right: Front - Alex, Faina, Chiang Ching-kuo, Eddie; Rear - Alan, Chiang Hsiao-chang. Chiang Ching-kuo family.jpg
Family of Chiang Ching-kuo. From left to right: Front – Alex, Faina, Chiang Ching-kuo, Eddie; Rear – Alan, Chiang Hsiao-chang.

Family tree

Family of Chiang Ching-kuo
Soong Mayling
宋美齡
Mao Fumei
毛福梅
Chiang Kaishek
蔣介石
Yao Yecheng
姚冶誠
Chen Jieru
陳潔如
Faina Chiang Fangliang
蔣方良
Chiang Ching-kuo
蔣經國
Chang Yajuo
章亞若
(mistress)
Shih Chini
石靜宜
Chiang Weikuo
蔣緯國
(adopted)
Chiu Juhsüeh
丘如雪
Chen Yaokuang
陈瑶光
(adopted)
Alan Chiang Hsiaowen
蔣孝文
Amy Chiang Hsiaochang
蔣孝章
Alex Chiang Hsiaowu
蔣孝武
Eddie Chiang Hsiaoyung
蔣孝勇
Winston Chang Hsiaotzu
章孝慈
John Chiang Hsiaoyen
蔣孝嚴
Chiang Hsiaokang
蔣孝剛
Nancy Xu Naijin
徐乃錦
Yu Yangho
俞揚和
Wang Zhangshi
汪長詩
Michelle Tsai Huimei
蔡惠媚
Elizabeth Fang Chiyi
方智怡
Chao Chungte
趙申德
Helen Huang Meilun
黃美倫
Wang Yihui
王倚惠
Theodore Yu Tsusheng
俞祖聲
Chang Chingsung
章勁松
Chang Yochu
章友菊
Vivian Chiang Huilan
蔣惠蘭
Chiang Huiyün
蔣惠筠
Chiang Wanan
蔣萬安
Chiang Yomei
蔣友梅
Alexandra Chiang Yolan
蔣友蘭
Johnathan Chiang Yosung
蔣友松
Demos Chiang Yobo
蒋友柏
Edward Chiang Yochang
蒋友常
Andrew Chiang Yoching
蒋友青
Chiang Yochüan
蒋友娟
Chiang Yochieh
蒋友捷
Notes
    • Dashed lines represent marriages
    • Dotted lines represent extra-marital relationships and adoptions
    • Solid lines represent descendants
    Sources

    See also

    Notes

    1. Many sources, even Taiwanese official ones, give 18 March 1910 as his birthday, but this actually refers to the traditional Chinese lunar calendar

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    References

    Citations

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    2. 白樺 (30 May 2016). "台灣舞蹈團體追尋蔣經國在俄足跡". Voice of America Cantonese site (in Chinese).
    3. letter of 4 August 1922
    4. Wang Shun-ch'i, unpublished article, 1995. The letter is in the Nanking archive
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    11. 1 2 Taylor 2000: 59.
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    34. Taiwan: A New History. p. 435.

    Cited sources

    Further reading

    Government offices
    Preceded by
    Minister of National Defence of the Republic of China
    1965–1969
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by
    Premier of the Republic of China
    1972–1978
    Succeeded by
    Political offices
    Preceded by
    Yen Chia-kan
    Acting Vice President of the Republic of China
    1975–1978
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by
    Yen Chia-kan
    President of the Republic of China
    1978–1988
    Succeeded by
    Party political offices
    Preceded by
    Chiang Kai-shek
    Director-General of the Kuomintang
    Chairman of the Kuomintang
    1975–1988
    Succeeded by
    Lee Teng-hui