Chick Meehan

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Chick Meehan
Chick Meehan newspaper photo.png
Biographical details
Born(1893-09-05)September 5, 1893
DiedNovember 9, 1972(1972-11-09) (aged 79)
Syracuse, New York
Playing career
1915–1917 Syracuse
Position(s) Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1920–1924 Syracuse
1925–1931 NYU
1932–1937 Manhattan
Head coaching record
Overall115–44–14

John Francis "Chick" Meehan (September 5, 1893 November 9, 1972) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Syracuse University (1920–1924), New York University (1925–1931), and Manhattan College (1932–1937), compiling a career college football record of 115–44–14. Meehan played quarterback at Syracuse from 1915 to 1917.

Contents

Meehan stated, "We learn practically nothing from a victory. All our information comes from a defeat. A winner forgets most of his mistakes." [1]

Coaching career

Syracuse

From 1920 to 1924, Meehan served as the head coach at Syracuse and compiled a 35–8–4 record. This total included back-to-back eight-win seasons in 1923 and 1924. [2]

NYU

Meehan was the 19th head football coach at New York University (NYU), serving for seven seasons, from 1925 to 1931, and compiling a record of 49–15–4. [3] This ranks him first at NYU in total wins and first at NYU in winning percentage. [4] Meehan was awarded a place in NYU's athletic hall of fame for his coaching efforts. [5]

Manhattan

Meehan's last head coaching job was as at Manhattan College. He held that position for six seasons, from 1932 until 1937. His career coaching record at Manhattan was 31–21–6. This ranks him first at Manhattan in total wins and second at Manhattan in winning percentage. [6]

Death

Meehan died at the age of 79 on November 9, 1972 at a hospital in Syracuse, New York. [7]

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Syracuse Orangemen (Independent)(1920–1924)
1920 Syracuse 6–2–1
1921 Syracuse 7–2
1922 Syracuse 6–1–2
1923 Syracuse 8–1
1924 Syracuse 8–2–1
Syracuse:35–8–4
NYU Violets (Independent)(1925–1931)
1925 NYU 6–2–1
1926 NYU 8–1
1927 NYU 7–1–2
1928 NYU 8–2
1929 NYU 7–3
1930 NYU 7–3
1931 NYU 6–3–1
NYU:49–15–4
Manhattan Jaspers (Independent)(1932–1937)
1932 Manhattan 5–3–2L Palm Festival
1933 Manhattan 6–3–1
1934 Manhattan 3–5–1
1935 Manhattan 5–3–1
1936 Manhattan 6–4
1937 Manhattan 6–3–1
Manhattan:31–21–6
Total:115–44–14

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The NYU Violets football team represented the New York University Violets in college football.

The 1926 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1926 college football season. In their second year under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 8–1 record.

The 1927 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1927 college football season. In their third year under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 7–1–2 record.

The 1929 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1929 college football season. In their fifth year under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 7–3 record.

The 1924 Syracuse Orangemen football team represented Syracuse University during the 1924 NCAA football season. The head coach was Chick Meehan, coaching his fifth season with the Orangemen. The team played their home games at Archbold Stadium in Syracuse, New York.

The 1936 Manhattan Jaspers football team was an American football team that represented Manhattan College as an independent during the 1936 college football season. In its fifth season under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 6–4 record and outscored opponents by a total of 145 to 92.

The 1932 Manhattan Jaspers football team was an American football team that represented Manhattan College as an independent during the 1932 college football season. In its first season under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 6–3–2 record. On January 1, 1933, the team played in the first Palm Festival game, predecessor to the Orange Bowl, in Miami.

The 1933 Manhattan Jaspers football team was an American football team that represented Manhattan College as an independent during the 1933 college football season. In its second season under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 5–3–1 record.

The 1941 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1941 college football season. In their eighth and final season under head coach Mal Stevens, the Violets compiled a 2–7 record and were outscored by a total of 243 to 47. The team played its home games at the Polo Grounds in Upper Manhattan, and Ohio Field and Yankee Stadium in The Bronx.

The 1930 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1930 college football season. In their sixth year under head coach Chick Meehan, the team compiled a 7–3 record.

References

  1. Danforth, William H. (1963). I Dare You (19th ed.). The Danforth Foundation. pp. 89–90. ISBN   9789561001596. Don't be discouraged if you fail in your first efforts. Coach Meehan of New York University says, 'We learn practically nothing from a victory. All our information comes from a defeat. A winner forgets most of his mistakes.'"
  2. John Meehan year-by-year coaching results
  3. The Ultimate Guide to College Football, James Quirk, 2004
  4. New York University Violets coaching records Archived December 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  5. New York University Athletics Hall of Fame
  6. Manhattan College coaching records Archived May 16, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  7. "Chick Meehan, Football Coach Of N.Y.U. and Syracuse, Dead" (PDF). The New York Times. November 10, 1972. Retrieved November 21, 2011.