Chickasha, Oklahoma

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Chickasha, Oklahoma
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Location of Chickasha, Oklahoma
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Chickasha, Oklahoma
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 35°02′28″N97°56′50″W / 35.04111°N 97.94722°W / 35.04111; -97.94722 Coordinates: 35°02′28″N97°56′50″W / 35.04111°N 97.94722°W / 35.04111; -97.94722
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Grady
Area
[1]
  Total22.08 sq mi (57.19 km2)
  Land22.03 sq mi (57.07 km2)
  Water0.05 sq mi (0.12 km2)
Elevation
[2]
1,112 ft (339 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total16,036
  Estimate 
(2018) [3]
16,352
  Density742.13/sq mi (286.54/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-13950 [4]
GNIS feature ID2409446 [2]
Website www.chickasha.org

Chickasha /ˈɪkəʃ/ is a city in and the county seat of Grady County, Oklahoma, United States. [5] The population was 16,036 at the 2010 census. [6] Chickasha is home to the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. The city is named for and strongly connected to Native American heritage, as "Chickasha" (Chikashsha) is the Choctaw word for Chickasaw.

Contents

History

Chickasha was founded by Hobart Johnstone Whitley, a land developer, banker, farmer and Rock Island Railroad executive. [7] The founding took place in 1892 when the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway (Rock Island) built a track through Indian Territory. A post office was established in June 1892. One of the earliest industrial plants to come to Chickasha was the Chickasha Cotton Oil Company, which was established in 1899. [8] The town incorporated in 1902. [9]

The Rock Island Depot in Chickasha Rock Island Chickasha.jpg
The Rock Island Depot in Chickasha

In 1908, the Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls was established in Chickasha. A local rancher named J. B. Sparks donated land for the school in memory of his daughter, Nellie. The girl was a Chickasaw descendant, and the land had been part of her allotment. The Nellie Sparks Dormitory commemorated her. The school was renamed as the Oklahoma College for Women in 1916. It became coeducational in 1965, and was renamed the Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts. It was renamed again in 1975 as the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. [9]

The Wilson and Bonfis Flying School opened in October 1941 to train cadets of the U.S. Army Air Force. Over eight thousand cadets completed training there during World War II. After the war, the facility became the Chickasha Municipal Airport. [9]

Also during the war, the army built and used Borden General Hospital. This site now contains Grady Memorial Hospital, Five Oaks Medical Group, Southern Plains Medical Center and Borden Park. [9]

A prisoner of war camp established in 1944 is now the site of the Grady County Fairgrounds. [9]

A panorama image of Chickasha in 1909 Panorama Chickasha, Okla LCCN2007662685.tif
A panorama image of Chickasha in 1909

Geography

Chickasha is located west of the center of Grady County and is 42 miles (68 km) southwest of Oklahoma City, [9] which is accessible via Interstate 44 (the H. E. Bailey Turnpike). I-44 passes through the southeast side of the city, with access from Exits 80 and 83, and leads southwest 47 miles (76 km) to Lawton. U.S. Route 62 runs through the city as Choctaw Avenue, leading east and then northeast 18 miles (29 km) to Blanchard and west 18 miles to Anadarko. U.S. Route 81 passes through the city center, leading south 40 miles (64 km) to Duncan and north 35 miles (56 km) to El Reno. U.S. Route 277 enters Chickasha from the south with US 81 and leaves to the east with US 62.

Line Creek passes through the north part of the city and flows into the Washita River about one mile northeast of the city. [10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 22.1 square miles (57.2 km2), of which 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 0.22%, is water. [6] The Washita River flows through the northern end of the city, then turns south and forms part of the city's eastern border.

Climate

Climate data for Chickasha, Oklahoma
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)87
(31)
92
(33)
98
(37)
98
(37)
102
(39)
110
(43)
116
(47)
116
(47)
109
(43)
101
(38)
89
(32)
84
(29)
116
(47)
Average high °F (°C)51
(11)
56
(13)
65
(18)
74
(23)
80
(27)
90
(32)
95
(35)
96
(36)
88
(31)
77
(25)
63
(17)
52
(11)
74
(23)
Average low °F (°C)28
(−2)
31
(−1)
39
(4)
49
(9)
58
(14)
67
(19)
71
(22)
70
(21)
62
(17)
50
(10)
38
(3)
30
(−1)
49
(10)
Record low °F (°C)−11
(−24)
−10
(−23)
−8
(−22)
21
(−6)
27
(−3)
45
(7)
52
(11)
43
(6)
34
(1)
13
(−11)
8
(−13)
−11
(−24)
Average precipitation inches (mm)1.2
(30)
1.2
(30)
2.0
(51)
3.4
(86)
5.4
(140)
3.9
(99)
2.4
(61)
2.4
(61)
3.2
(81)
3.1
(79)
1.6
(41)
1.4
(36)
31.2
(790)
Average snowfall inches (cm)1.6
(4.1)
1.2
(3.0)
0.8
(2.0)
0.1
(0.25)
1
(2.5)
4.7
(12)
Average rainy days3.23.24.86.47.36.64.84.85.25.23.23.658.3
Average relative humidity (%)70696262716967646365636766
Source #1: weather.com
Source #2: Weatherbase.com [11]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 3,209
1910 10,320221.6%
1920 10,179−1.4%
1930 14,09938.5%
1940 14,1110.1%
1950 15,84212.3%
1960 14,886−6.0%
1970 14,194−4.6%
1980 15,82811.5%
1990 14,988−5.3%
2000 15,8505.8%
2010 16,0361.2%
Est. 201816,352 [3] 2.0%
Sources: [4] [12] [13] [14]

As of the 2010 Census, there were 16,036 people, 6,374 households, and 3,898 families residing in the city. [15] [16] From 2000 to 2010, the Chickasha city population growth percentage was 1.2% (or from 15,850 people to 16,036 people). There were 7,380 housing units. [17] The racial makeup of the city was 80.0% White, 7.1% African American, 4.8% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.1% from other races, and 5.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.5% of the population. [18]

Of the 6,434 households, 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.5% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.95. [15]

The population included 22.8% under the age of 18, 12.4% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.3 males. [19]

According to the 2009-2013 American Community Survey (ACS), the median income for a household in the city was $38,341, and the median income for a family was $44,547. Males had a median income of $38,987 versus $27,357 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,848. About 12.9% of families and 17.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.0% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over. [20]

Government

Chickasha has an elected mayor and city council, with a city manager on its staff. [9]

Economy

Agriculture, particularly wheat production, and cattle raising have been important to the city's economy since its earliest days. Manufacturing became important about the middle of the 20th century. ArvinMeritor Replacement Parts and Delta Faucet opened facilities in the 1970s. [9]

Arts and culture

Shannon Springs Park during the Annual Festival of Light Shannon Springs Park.JPG
Shannon Springs Park during the Annual Festival of Light

The city's annual Festival of Light takes place at the 43-acre (170,000 m2) Shannon Springs Park and opens nightly from around Thanksgiving to the end of December. Concessions, carriage rides, pictures with Santa, and shopping are available. The Festival of Light has received many prestigious awards over the years including Regional Event of the Year, A.B.A. Top 100 Event, National Top 25 Holiday Event, Festival of the Year, Best Community Festival Event and Best Place to Take Out of Town Visitors. The festival has been featured statewide on Discover Oklahoma, ranked as a Top Place to Visit by Fine Living Network (2004), and designated as an official 2007 Oklahoma Centennial Event. Over 140 businesses and clubs sponsor the event in various ways. The installation of lights in 290 trees, 8 miles (13 km) of walk-ways, bridges, arbors, gazebos and buildings begins in September; however, it takes through March to get the lights taken down and stored away. More than 1,200 volunteers donate time and skill, and now Display Sponsors have reached the 100 mark. The park has over 3.5 million lights, and the crystal pedestrian bridge boasts over 75,000 lights alone. It draws together over a thousand local volunteers and more than 250,000 visitors from across the United States. [21]

Te Ata statue in front of Trout Hall on the USAO campus USAO Troutt Hall.jpg
Te Ata statue in front of Trout Hall on the USAO campus

The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma hosts an annual festival, the Spring Triad, which is made up of the Montmartre Chalk Art Festival, the Droverstock music festival, and the Scholastic Meet. [22] [23] The event is held annually on the first Thursday of April. [24] The art festival is held around the USAO Oval, where over 700 artists compete in a chalk art contest. [25] [26] Droverstock features over 12 hours of live music from various bands of all styles and genres. [27] There are also many vendors, inflatables, and activities associated with the festival. [27] The Scholastic Meet attracts around 1000 students annually from over 50 Oklahoma counties who compete in academic disciplines such as math, science, music, history, and other subjects. [28] [29] The competition is the largest academic meet in the state. Overall, the day-long event attracts thousands into the community. [24]

The Muscle Car Ranch located on the south edge of Chickasha hosts an annual swap meet and concert, which is held in August. The Ranch, located on 70 acres (280,000 m2) of a 1900s dairy farm, features hundreds of nostalgic advertisements and memorabilia representing the last 75 years of American history. [30] The concert has featured rock and roll groups such as The Byrds, The Grass Roots, Paul Revere & the Raiders, Jefferson Airplane, The Lovin' Spoonful, Firefall, John Conlee, Dr. Hook and Bad Company. [31] [32]

From a small local swapmeet, the Chickasha Pre-war Swap Meet has evolved to be one of the significant swapmeets for owners and collectors of cars from before 1942 (World War II). According to numerous posts in the forum of the Model T Club of America, the Chickasha Pre-war Swap Meet is considered the best Ford Model T swapmeet in the US. [33]

Education

Chickasha Public School District includes Chickasha High School, Chickasha Middle School, Lincoln Elementary, Grand Elementary, and the Bill Wallace Early Childhood Center. [34]

Chickasha is the current location of a historic schoolhouse that served black children in Grady County. Verden Separate School was built by African American Allen Toles on his own property in the nearby town of Verden in 1910. [35] The school operated until 1935. [36] The school building was rediscovered by historians in 2004 and restored and relocated to Chickasha. [36] It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. [36]

Verden Separate School in Chickasha Verden Separate School.jpg
Verden Separate School in Chickasha

A branch of Canadian Valley Technology Center provides vocational and community education in Chickasha. [37]

The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, Oklahoma's public liberal arts college, is located in Chickasha. It was founded in 1908 by the Oklahoma State Legislature as Oklahoma Industrial Institute and College for Girls. [38] The school's name was officially changed to Oklahoma College for Women in 1916. [39] In 1965, the school became coeducational, and its name was changed to Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts. [40] The school is currently known as the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma.

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Grady County, Oklahoma U.S. county in Oklahoma

Grady County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 52,431. Its county seat is Chickasha. It was named for Henry W. Grady, an editor of the Atlanta Constitution and southern orator.

Caddo County, Oklahoma U.S. county in Oklahoma

Caddo County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,600. Its county seat is Anadarko. Created in 1901 as part of Oklahoma Territory, the county is named for the Caddo tribe who were settled here on a reservation in the 1870s. Caddo County is immediately west of the seven-county Greater Oklahoma City metro area, and although is not officially in the metro area, it has many economic ties in this region.

Yukon, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Yukon is a city in eastern Canadian County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. The population was 22,709 at the 2010 census. Founded in the 1890s, the town was named in reference to a gold rush in Yukon Territory, Canada, at the time. Historically, Yukon served as an urban center for area farmers and the site of a large milling operation. It is now considered primarily a bedroom community for people who work in Oklahoma City.

Lindsay, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

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Alex, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Minco, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

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Ninnekah, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Norge, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Pocasset, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Rush Springs, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Verden, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Choctaw, Oklahoma Place in Oklahoma, United States

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Blanchard is a city in McClain and Grady counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 7,670 at the 2010 census, up from 2,816 at the 2000 census. Blanchard is part of a rapidly growing area of northern McClain and Grady counties known as the "Tri-City Area" with Newcastle and Tuttle.

University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma

The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma (USAO) is a public liberal arts university in Chickasha, Oklahoma. It is the only public college in Oklahoma with a strictly liberal arts–focused curriculum and is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. USAO is an undergraduate-only institution and grants bachelor's degrees in a variety of subject areas. The school was founded in 1908 as a school for women and from 1912 to 1965 was known as Oklahoma College for Women. It became coeducational in 1965 and today educates approximately 1,000 students. In 2001, the entire Oklahoma College for Women campus was listed as a national historic district.

Bridge Creek, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

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Oklahoma City metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Oklahoma, United States

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KWCO-FM

KWCO-FM is a radio station broadcasting a classic hits music format. Licensed to Chickasha, Oklahoma, United States, the station is currently owned by Mollman Media, Inc. Most of KWCO-FM's programming is live and local Monday–Friday 6 AM – 6 PM, and during local sports broadcast coverage. KWCO offers a local swap-shop program Mon–Fri at 9:00 am and 8:30 am on Saturday.

Chickasha High School School in the United States

Chickasha High School is located in Chickasha, Oklahoma, United States. For the 2012–2013 school year, the school had an enrollment of 684 with 48 teachers.

Bryan Byars is an American soccer player who currently plays as goalkeeper for FC Tulsa of the USL Championship.

Anna Lewis (1885–1961) was a noted teacher, historian and writer, who specialized in American History, and particularly the History of the Southwest. Born in what was then Indian Territory to a family of mixed Choctaw and European Ancestry, she earned doctoral degrees from University of California, Berkeley (1915) and University of Oklahoma (1930). She was the first woman to receive a Ph. D. at the University of Oklahoma. Lewis spent her educational career at the Oklahoma College for Women. She wrote two books and numerous articles for publications in her area of interest before retiring in 1956 to a home she had built in southern Oklahoma. She died in 1961.

References

  1. "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Feb 12, 2020.
  2. 1 2 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Chickasha, Oklahoma
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. Template:Cite web In 2020 it was featured in a TFIL video where they randomly threw at dart at a map
  6. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Chickasha city, Oklahoma". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2017.[ dead link ]
  7. "Hollywoodland H. J. Whitley."
  8. Munn, 7
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  10. Chickasha, OK, 7.5 Minute Topographic Quadrangle, USGS, 1966 (1976 rev.)
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  18. "QT-P3: Race and Hispanic or Latino Origin: 2010," Archived 2015-01-31 at Archive.today United States Census Bureau, 2010. Accessed January 31, 2015.
  19. "QT-PI: Age Groups and Sex: 2010," Archived 2015-01-31 at Archive.today United States Census Bureau, 2010. Accessed January 31, 2015.
  20. "DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics: 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates," Archived 2015-01-31 at Archive.today U.S. Census Bureau, 2013. Accessed January 31, 2015.
  21. "Festival of Light History," Archived 2015-01-01 at the Wayback Machine Chickasha Festival of Light, Retrieved January 21, 2015.
  22. Snyder, Rachel. " Annual Drover concert begins today," The Express-Star, April 3, 2014. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  23. la terra studio. "Chickasha, Grady County, Oklahoma: Park System Master Plan," [ permanent dead link ]Chickasha Parks and Recreation Department, July 24, 2013, p. 13. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  24. 1 2 "Spring Triad Events Draw Thousands to USAO Campus" Archived January 29, 2015, at Archive.today , University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, April 9, 2014. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  25. Coppernoll, Carrie. "USAO sidewalk chalk festival draws out creativity in Chickasha," NewsOK, April 13, 2011. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  26. Vollmar, Rob. "Chalk art festival sends out call to Oklahoma artists," The Express-Star, January 26, 2015. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  27. 1 2 "Droverstock 2015," University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, Accessed January 28, 2015.
  28. Snyder, Rachel. "Southmoore takes first at USAO scholastic meet," The Express-Star, April 6, 2014. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  29. "Scholastic Meet 2015," University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, Accessed January 28, 2015.
  30. Krebs, Michelle. "Auto Museums in the Deep South ," The New York Times, February 20, 2008. Accessed January 28, 2015.
  31. Austerman, Lisa. "Muscle Car Ranch's Auto, Motorcycle Swap Meet Is Family Event," NewsOK, August 13, 1995. Accessed January 28, 2015.
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  34. "Schools," Archived January 25, 2015, at the Wayback Machine Chickasha Public Schools, Accessed January 28, 2015.
  35. Lane, Jessica. "Verden Separate School featured as best in country," The Express-Star, June 25, 2014. Accessed January 28, 2015.
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