Chilaquiles

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Chilaquiles
Portada-chilaquiles-rojos.jpg
Chilaquiles
CourseBreakfast
Place of origin Mexico
Region or state Americas
Main ingredients Tortillas, green or red salsa, pulled chicken, cheese, refried beans

Chilaquiles (Spanish pronunciation:  [tʃilaˈkiles] ) from the Nahuatl word chīlāquilitl [t͡ʃiːlaːˈkilit͡ɬ] ("chiles and greens") is a traditional Mexican dish. [1]

Contents

Ingredients and variations

Typically, corn tortillas cut in quarters and lightly fried are the basis of the dish. [2] Green or red salsa or mole is poured over the crisp tortilla triangles. The mixture is simmered until the tortilla starts softening. Pulled chicken is sometimes added to the mix. It is commonly garnished with crema, crumbled queso fresco , raw onion rings and avocado slices. Chilaquiles can be served with refried beans, eggs (scrambled or fried), beef and guacamole as side dish.

As with many Mexican dishes, regional and family variations are quite common. Usually, chilaquiles are eaten at breakfast or brunch. This makes them a popular recipe to use leftover tortillas and salsas.

Etymology

Chilaquiles. Mexican breakfast dish. FOOD Chilaquiles 1.jpg
Chilaquiles. Mexican breakfast dish.
Nahuatl names for chilaquiles [3] 1st ComponentEnglish Literalpronunciation (IPA)2nd ComponentEnglish Literalpronunciation (IPA)
chīlāquilitl [lower-alpha 1] chīlātlchile water [ˈt͡ʃiːlaːt͡ɬ] quilitledible plant [ˈkilit͡ɬ]
tlaxcalpōpozōntlaxcallitortilla [t͡ɬaʃˈkalːi] pōpozōnfoam [poːˈposoːn]

Regional variations

Chilaquiles with refried beans 01 Chilaquiles verdes con frijoles chinos.jpg
Chilaquiles with refried beans

In central Mexico it is common for the tortilla chips to remain crisp. To achieve this, all ingredients except the salsa are placed on a plate and the salsa is poured at the last moment, seconds before serving. In Guadalajara, cazuelas are kept simmering filled with chilaquiles that become thick in texture similar to polenta . In the state of Sinaloa, chilaquiles are sometimes prepared with a white sauce. In the state of Tamaulipas, on the north-east side of the country, red tomato sauce is commonly used. [2]

History in the United States

Recipes for chilaquiles have been found in a U.S. cookbook published in 1898, Encarnación Pinedo's El cocinero español (The Spanish Cook). She included three recipes—one for chilaquiles tapatios a la mexicana, one for chilaquiles a la mexicana, and one for chilaquiles con camarones secos (chilaquiles with dry shrimp). [4]

See also

Footnotes

  1. The English name derives from this Nahuatl word.

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References

  1. Bayless, Rick (2000). Mexico: One Plate at a Time. New York: Scribner. p. 129. ISBN   0-684-84186-X.
  2. 1 2 Kennedy, Diana (1972). "Tortillas and Tortilla Dishes". The Cuisines of Mexico. Harper & Row. p. 67. ISBN   978-0-06-012344-4.
  3. Nahuatl dictionary. (1997). Wired humanities project. Retrieved September 9, 2012, from link
  4. Pinedo, Encarnación; Strehl, Dan; Valle, Victor (2005-10-24). "Encarnación's Kitchen: Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California". ISBN   978-0-520-24676-8.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)