Chimta

Last updated
Chimta
Chimta (5945190629).jpg
Percussion instrument
Other names Chimpta, musical fire tongs
Classification

idiophone
Related instruments

Dhol
Musicians

Alam Lohar, Arif Lohar, Kamal Heer

Chimta (Punjabi : ਚਿਮਟਾ, Shahmukhī: چمٹا ) literally means tongs. Over time it has evolved into a traditional instrument of South Asia by the permanent addition of small brass jingles. This instrument is often used in popular Punjabi folk songs, Bhangra music and the Sikh religious music known as Gurbani Kirtan.

Punjabi language native language of Punjabi people

Punjabi is an Indo-Aryan language with more than 100 million native speakers in the Indian subcontinent and spread with the Punjabi diaspora worldwide. It is the native language of the Punjabi people, an ethnic group of the cultural region of Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent, which extends from northwest India through eastern Pakistan.

Tongs kitchenware used for picking up items

Tongs are a type of tool used to grip and lift objects instead of holding them directly with hands. There are many forms of tongs adapted to their specific use. Some are merely large pincers or nippers, but most fall into these few classes:

  1. Tongs that have long arms terminating in small flat circular ends of tongs and are pivoted at a joint close to the handle used to handle delicate objects. Common fire-tongs, used for picking up pieces of coal and placing them on a fire without burning fingers or getting them dirty are of this type. Tongs for grilling, tongs for serving salad or spaghetti are kitchen utensil of the same type. They provide a way to move, rotate and turn the food with delicate precision, or fetch a full serving in one grab.
  2. Tongs consisting of a single band of metal bent round one or two bands joined at the head by a spring, as in sugar-tongs, asparagus-tongs and the like.
  3. Tongs in which the pivot or joint is placed close to the gripping ends are used to handle hard and heavy objects. Driller's round tongs, blacksmith's tongs or crucible tongs are of this type.

Instrument may refer to:

Contents

The player of the chimta is able to produce a chiming sound if he holds the joint of the instrument in one hand and strikes the two sides of the chimta together. The jingles are made of metal and thus it produces a metallic sound and helps to keep up the beat of the song. [1]

In Bhangra music or at weddings it is often combined with Dhol and Bhangra dancers.

Dhol double-headed Indian drum

Dhol can refer to any one of a number of similar types of double-headed drum widely used, with regional variations, throughout the Indian subcontinent. Its range of distribution in India, Bangladesh and Pakistan primarily includes northern areas such as the Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, Kashmir, Sindh, Assam Valley, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Konkan, Goa, Karnataka, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. The range stretches westward as far as eastern Afghanistan. A related instrument is the dholak or dholki.

Construction and design

The chimta consists of a long, flat piece of steel or iron that is pointed at both ends, and folded over in the middle. A metal ring is attached near the fold, and there are jingles or rings attached along the sides at regular intervals. Sometimes there are seven pairs of jingles. The rings are plucked in a downward motion to produce tinkling sounds. Chimtas with large rings are used at rural festivals while ones with smaller rings are often used as an accompaniment to Bhangra dancers and singers of traditional Indian hymns. [2]

Steel alloy made by combining iron and other elements

Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon, and sometimes other elements. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, it is a major component used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, automobiles, machines, appliances, and weapons.

Iron Chemical element with atomic number 26

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space.

Notable players

The late Alam Lohar is famous for playing this instrument and introducing it to global audiences. Today, musicians like Kamal Heer and Arif Lohar play this instrument. Also known as the "rusty tambourine sword",[ citation needed ] the chimta has been played by members of the experimental rock band His Name Is Alive on recent tours.[ citation needed ]

Alam Lohar Pakistani singer

Alam Lohar was a prominent Punjabi folk music singer from the Punjab region of Pakistan, formerly British India. He is credited with creating and popularising the musical term Jugni.

Kamal Heer is a Punjabi musician. He is the younger brother of Manmohan Waris and Sangtar, two other esteemed musicians. His live performances showcase his virtuosity with taan and his command of the art of traditional Punjabi music. All three Heer brothers are behind the formulation of Punjabi Virsa shows all over the world. These shows have become internationally famous. Also a talented composer, Kamal Heer has collaborated with his brother Sangtar to write music for their brother Waris.

Arif Lohar is a Punjabi folk singer from Pakistan. He usually sings accompanied by a native musical instrument resembling tongs. His folk music is representative of the traditional folk heritage of the Punjab. He is the son of the renowned folk singer Alam Lohar.

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References

  1. "Maps Of India" . Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  2. "Maps of India" . Retrieved 27 September 2011.