Chitral District

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Chitral District

ضلع چترال
The City of Chitral and Tirich Mir.jpg
A view of the city of Chitral
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, KPK, Map.png
Map of Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, with Chitral shown in the far north.
CountryFlag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan
Province Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Capital Chitral
Established1970
Area
   District 14,850 km2 (5,730 sq mi)
Population
 (2017) [1]
   District 447,362
  Density30/km2 (78/sq mi)
   Urban
49,794
   Rural
397,568
Time zone UTC+5 (PST)
Number of Tehsils 6
Website www.khyberpakhtunkhwa.gov.pk

Chitral District (Urdu : ضِلع چترال) was the largest district in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan, covering an area of 14,850 km², before splitting into Upper Chitral District and Lower Chitral District in 2018. [2] Part of the Malakand Division, it is the northernmost district of Pakistan. [3] It shares a border with Gilgit-Baltistan to the east, with Kunar, Badakshan and Nuristan provinces of Afghanistan to the north and west, and with the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa districts of Swat and Dir to the south. [4] A narrow strip of Wakhan Corridor separates Chitral from Tajikistan in the north. [5]

Contents

Shandur, Chitral Shandur (chitral) 20.jpg
Shandur, Chitral

History

Reflections at sunset.jpg
Tirich Mir mount chitral Tirich Mir Hotel.jpg
Tirich Mir mount chitral

Chitral shares much of its history and culture with the neighboring Hindu-Kush territories of Gilgit-Baltistan, a region sometimes called "Peristan" because of the common belief in fairies (peri) inhabiting the high mountains.

The entire region that now forms the Chitral District was an independent monarchical state until 1895, when the British negotiated a treaty with its hereditary ruler, the Mehtar, under which Chitral became a semi-autonomous princely state within the Indian Empire. Chitral retained this status even after its accession to Pakistan in 1947, finally being made an administrative district of Pakistan in 1969, disestablishing the Princely state. [6]

Topography and access

Chitral is counted amongst the highest regions of the world, sweeping from 1,094 meters at Arandu to 7,726 meters at Tirichmir, and packing over 40 peaks more than 6,100 meters in height. The terrain of Chitral is very mountainous and Tirich Mir (25,289 feet) the highest peak of the Hindu Kush, rises in the north of the district. [7] Around 4.8 per cent of the land is covered by forest and 76 per cent is mountains and glaciers. [8]

Chitral Ayun The green and the yellow.JPG
Chitral Ayun

Chitral is connected to the rest of Pakistan by two major road routes, the Lowari Pass (el. 10,230 ft.) from Dir and Shandur Top (elevation 12,200 ft.) from Gilgit. Both routes used to be closed in winter, but circa 2017 the highway Lowari Tunnel under the Lowari Pass opened to vehicular traffic for at least ten hours per day. [9] A number of other high passes, including Darkot Pass, Thoi Pass and Zagaran Pass, provide access on foot to Chitral from Gilgit-Baltistan.

Demographics

The district has a population of about 414,000. [3] The general population is mainly of the Kho people, who speak the Khowar, which is also spoken in parts of Yasin, Gilgit, Dir and Swat. Chitral is also home to the Kalash tribe, who live in Bumburet and two other remote valleys southwest of Chitral town. A few thousand Nuristani people are also known to live in Chitral.

Chitral Town

The town of Chitral is the main town in the district and serves as its capital. It is situated on the west bank of the Chitral River (also known as the Kunar River) at the foot of Tirich Mir which at 7,708 m (25,289 ft) is the highest peak of the Hindu Kush. Until 1969, it served as the capital of the princely state of Chitral.

Administration

The district of Chitral is divided into twenty-four union councils and two tehsils: [10] [11] [12]

National Assembly

This district is represented by one elected MNA (Member of National Assembly) in Pakistan National Assembly. Its constituency is NA-32. [13]

Member of National AssemblyParty AffiliationYear
Abdul Akbar Khan Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal 2002
Shahzada Mohiuddin Pakistan Muslim League 2008
Shahzada Iftikhar Uddin All Pakistan Muslim League 2013

Provincial Assembly

The district is represented by two elected MPAs in the provincial assembly who represent the following constituencies:

See also

Related Research Articles

Ghizer District (1974–2019)

The Ghizer District, formed in 1974, is the westernmost part of the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan. Currently, it is proposed to split Ghizer District into two (2) districts:

  1. The western part of Ghizer District includes the actual Ghizer/ Gherz Valley of Phander, Gupis and Yasin. The name as Ghizer District will be kept with this region due to the connectivity to its origin.
  2. While the eastern part of the current District will include Puniyal and Ishkoman. And probably the newly district would be given the name as Puniyal-Ishkoman District.
Chitral Town in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Chitral is a town situated on the Chitral River in northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. It serves as the capital of the Chitral District and likewise served as the capital of the Chitral princely state that encompassed the region until its direct incorporation into West Pakistan in 1969.

Dorah Pass

Dorah Pass, also called Durah Pass, connects Badakshan Province of Afghanistan with Chitral District in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The Dorah Pass is more than 14,000 feet (4,300 m) high. It is located along the Durand Line border and crosses the Hindu Kush mountain range. Situated at the foot of the pass is Lake Dufferin, also known locally as Hawz-i Dorah. The lake is roughly 2+34 miles (4.4 km) long by over one-quarter mile (0.4 km) broad.

Broghil Pass

Broghil, also spelled Broghol, is a high mountain pass along the Durand Line border that crosses the Hindu Kush mountain range and connects Wakhan District of Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan with Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

Lowari Pass

Lowari Pass, or Lowari Top, is a high mountain pass that connects Chitral with Dir in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Lowari Top is a relatively low pass, by far the lowest pass to enter Chitral, the rest all being 12,000 to 15,000 feet.

Shandur Pass

Shandur Pass is a pass located in between the Gupis-Yasin District of Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. It is often called 'Roof of the World'. Shandur top is located in Upper Chitral, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and has a flat plateau and can be crossed between late April and early November. The grade is very gradual, and the area is crossed by plentiful small streams during summer.

Yasin Valley Valley in Gilgit Baltistan, Pakistan

Yasin, also known as Babaye-i-Yasen or Worshigum, is a high mountain valley in the Hindu Kush mountains, in the northern part of Gupis-Yasin District in the territory of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. The valley is about 148 kilometres (92 mi) from city of Gilgit. The Yasin Tehsil is situated on its territory.

Dir District Place in Pakistan

Dir is a region in northwestern Pakistan in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, in the foothills of the Himalayas. Before Pakistan was created, Dir was a princely state, and it remained so until 1969 when it was abolished by a presidential declaration, and the Dir District was created the following year. The area covers 5,280 square kilometres. In 1996 it was divided into Lower Dir and Upper Dir.

Upper Dir District District in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Upper Dir District is a district in Malakand Division of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province in Pakistan. The town of Dir is the district headquarters. Badogai Pass connects it to Utror.

Chitral (princely state) Former princely state of British India and Pakistan

Chitral was a princely state in alliance with British India until 1947, then a princely state of Pakistan until 1969. The area of the state now forms the Chitral District of the Malakand Division, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

Kunar River

The Kūnaṛ River, also known in its upper reaches as the Mastuj, Chitral, or Kama River, is about 480 kilometres (300 mi) long, located in eastern Afghanistan and northern Pakistan. It emerges just south of the Broghil Pass, in the upper part of Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa near the Afghan border. The river system is fed by melting glaciers and snow of the Hindu Kush mountains. The Kunar River is a tributary of the Kabul River, which is in turn a tributary of the Indus River.

Arandu, Pakistan town in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Arandu (ارندو), also known as Arnawai (ارنوۍ), is a town in the Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, on the banks of the Landai Sin River just above its confluence with the Kunar River. Arandu lies on the border with Kunar Province, Afghanistan.

Mastuj Tehsil Tehsil in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Mastuj is a town and Tehsil of Chitral District in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. It is located at 36°17'0N 72°31'0E with an altitude of 2359 metres. There are ruins of old fort built originally in 18th century and reconstructed several times.

The Katoor Dynasty is a dynasty, which along with its collateral branches ruled the sovereign, later princely state of Chitral and its neighbours in the eastern Hindu Kush region for over 450 years, from around 1570 until 1947. At the height its power under Mehtar Aman ul-Mulk the territory controlled by the dynasty extended from Asmar in the Kunar Valley to Sher Qilla in the Gilgit valley. The Mehtar of Chitral was an influential player in the power politics of the region as he acted as an intermediary between the rulers of Badakhshan, the Yousafzai pashtuns, the Maharaja of Kashmir and later the Amir of Afghanistan.

Chitral Scouts Paramilitary force of Pakistan

The Chitral Scouts (CS), also known as Chitral Levies, originally raised in 1903 as the militia of the princely state of Chitral, is now a unit of the federally controlled Frontier Corps of Pakistan. Recruited mostly from the Chitral and Kalash Valleys areas along the western borders and led by officers from the Pakistan Army. The Frontier Corps of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa falls under the control of the Ministry of the Interior. Its headquarters is at Chitral town, and it is commanded by a Colonel of the Pakistan Army.

Tourism in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is located in the north-west region of Pakistan. It is known as the tourist hotspot for adventurers and explorers. The province has a varied landscape ranging from rugged mountains, valleys, hills and dense agricultural farms. The region is well known for its ancestral roots. There are a number of Buddhist archaeological sites from the Gandhara civilisation such as Takht Bhai and Pushkalavati. There are a number of other Buddhist and Hindu archaeological sites including Bala Hisar Fort, Butkara Stupa, Kanishka stupa, Chakdara, Panjkora Valley and Sehri Bahlol.

Shandur Polo Festival

Shandur Polo Festival is one of the big festivals in Pakistan. This festival is held from 7 to 9 July every year on Shandur Pass in Chitral District of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.The polo match is played between the teams of Chitral District and districts of Gilgit-Baltistan, is a free style game.

Upper Chitral District District in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

Upper Chitral District is a district in Malakand Division situated on the Chitral River in northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, province in Pakistan. Upper Chitral District along with Chitral lower district were part of the erstwhile Chitral District was the largest district in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan, covering an area of 14,850 km² and likewise served as the Chitral princely state that encompassed the region until its direct incorporation into West Pakistan in 1969. of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province in Pakistan. Upper Chitral has been bifurcated from Chitral lower district in November 2018.The town Booni is the capital of Chitral Upper district. It shares a border with Gilgit-Baltistan to the east, with Badakshan province of Afghanistan to the north and west, and with the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa districts of Chitral Lower and Swat to the south. A narrow strip of Wakhan Corridor separates Chitral from Tajikistan in the north.

Ghizer District (2019–) District of Gilgit-Baltistan in Pakistan


The Ghizer District is one of the 14 districts of Pakistan-administered territory of Gilgit-Baltistan. The former Ghizer District that existed from 1974 to 2019 spanned the entire upper Gilgit River Valley. In 2019, the former district was divided into the Gupis-Yasin District in the west and the present, smaller Ghizer District in the east.

References

  1. "DISTRICT AND TEHSIL LEVEL POPULATION SUMMARY WITH REGION BREAKUP: KHYBER PAKHTUNKHWA" (PDF). Pakistan Bureau of Statistics. 3 January 2018. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 April 2018. Retrieved 23 April 2018.
  2. "Upper Chitral gets status of separate district". dawn.com. 21 November 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  3. 1 2 "District Government Chitral". Chitral District Government Web Portl. Archived from the original on 28 September 2015.
  4. Cutherell, Danny. "Governance and Militancy in Pakistan's Chitral district" (PDF). Center for Strategic and International Studies.
  5. Nusser, Marcus; Dickoré, Wolf Bernhard (2002). "A Tangle in the Triangle: Vegetation Map of the Eastern Hindukush (Chitral, Northern Pakistan)" (PDF). Erdkunde . 56 (1): 37–59. doi:10.3112/erdkunde.2002.01.03. JSTOR   23218603.
  6. Marsden, Magnus (2010). "A tour not so grand: mobile Muslims in northern Pakistan". In Osella; Filippo; Soares; Benjamin (eds.). Islam, Politics, Anthropology. Chichester, England: Royal Anthropological Institute by Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 57–75, page 58. ISBN   978-1-4443-3295-7.
  7. "Disaster Vulnerability Assessment Report, District Chitral, KPK, Pakistan" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  8. "Chitral, Pakistan Flash flood risk assessment, capacity building, and awareness raising" (PDF).
  9. 1 2 Zahiruddin (30 September 2018). "Lowari tunnel: opportunities and challenges". Dawn . Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  10. Chitral National Reconstruction Bureau website Archived 28 April 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  11. "Pakistan: North West Frontier Province: District, Tehsil and Union Code Reference Map (MA518-pak-NWFP UCs A3-v01)" (PDF). Pakistan: United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). 1 July 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 November 2013.
  12. "List of Tehsils/Talukas with Respect to Their Districts". Statistics Division, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Statistics, Government of Pakistan. Archived from the original on 5 March 2010.
  13. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 10 November 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

Coordinates: 36°15′N72°15′E / 36.250°N 72.250°E / 36.250; 72.250