Chojnice County

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Chojnice County

Powiat chojnicki
POL powiat chojnicki flag.svg
Flag
POL powiat chojnicki COA.svg
Coat of arms
POL powiat chojnicki locator map (label-pl).svg
Coordinates(Chojnice): 53°42′N17°33′E / 53.700°N 17.550°E / 53.700; 17.550 Coordinates: 53°42′N17°33′E / 53.700°N 17.550°E / 53.700; 17.550
CountryFlag of Poland.svg  Poland
Voivodeship Pomeranian
Seat Chojnice
Gminas
Area
  Total1,364.25 km2 (526.74 sq mi)
Population
 (2019)
  Total97,616
  Density72/km2 (190/sq mi)
   Urban
54,988
  Rural
42,628
Car plates GCH
Website http://powiat.chojnice.pl/

Chojnice County (Kashubian : Chòniczzi kréz, Polish : powiat chojnicki) is a unit of territorial administration and local government (powiat) in Pomeranian Voivodeship, northern Poland. It came into being on January 1, 1999, as a result of the Polish local government reforms passed in 1998. Its administrative seat and largest town is Chojnice, which lies 103 kilometres (64 mi) south-west of the regional capital Gdańsk. The county also contains the towns of Czersk, lying 30 km (19 mi) east of Chojnice, and Brusy, 24 km (15 mi) north-east of Chojnice.

Contents

The county covers an area of 1,364.25 square kilometres (526.7 sq mi). As of 2019 its total population is 97,616, out of which the population of Chojnice is 39,890, that of Czersk is 9,910, that of Brusy is 5,188, and the rural population is 42,628. [1]


Chojnice County on a map of the counties of Pomeranian Voivodeship

Chojnice County is bordered by Bytów County and Kościerzyna County to the north, Starogard County and Tuchola County to the east, Sępólno County to the south, and Człuchów County to the west.

Villages belonging to Landreis Konitz; Konitz (on top) and the Koschneiderei 1926 Koschneiderei 1926.gif
Villages belonging to Landreis Konitz; Konitz (on top) and the Koschneiderei 1926

History

Between 1172 and 1920 the county, with varying boundaries, was part of Prussia. Following the First World War this part of West Prussia was awarded to Poland by the Treaty of Versailles. From 1938 to 1945 the Landkreis Konitz was part of the newly-created Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia.

Administrative divisions

The county is subdivided into five gminas (one urban, two urban-rural and two rural). These are listed in the following table, in descending order of population.

GminaTypeArea
(km²)
Population
(2019)
Seat
Chojnice urban21.139,890 
Gmina Czersk urban-rural379.921,643 Czersk
Gmina Chojnice rural458.319,195 Chojnice *
Gmina Brusy urban-rural400.714,572 Brusy
Gmina Konarzyny rural104.32,316 Konarzyny
* seat not part of the gmina

Culture

Monuments

On the list of the National Heritage Institute there are 54 objects from Chojnie County.

Referring to Voivodship Register of Monuments, there are over 808 objects located in the county. Most historical buildings are located in the commune of Chojnice - 294 items, and the least in the commune of Konarzyny - 41. [2]

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References

  1. GUS. "Population. Size and structure and vital statistics in Poland by territorial divison in 2019. As of 30th June". stat.gov.pl. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  2. "Voivodeship Register of Monuments" (in Polish). Retrieved 2018-11-11.