Chonchon County

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Chonchon County

전천군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja前川郡
  McCune-ReischauerChŏnch'ŏn kun
  Revised RomanizationJeoncheon-gun
DPRK2006 Chagang-Chonchon.PNG
Map of Chagang showing the location of Chonchon
Country North Korea
Province Chagang Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 5 workers' districts, 11 ri
Area
  Total980 km2 (380 sq mi)
Population
 (1990 est.)
  Total100,000

Chŏnch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in central Chagang province, North Korea. Originally part of Kanggye, it was made a separate county in 1949. The terrain is high and mountainous; the highest point is Sungjoksan, 1984 m above sea level. The Chogyuryong Mountains pass through the eastern part of the county.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Kanggye Municipal City in Chagang Province, North Korea

Kanggye is the provincial capital of Chagang, North Korea and has a population of 251,971. Because of its strategic importance, derived from its topography, it has been of military interest from the time of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

Contents

A significant match factory is located in the county, as is North Korea's largest fir tree.

Administrative divisions

Chŏnch'ŏn County is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 5 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 11 ri (villages):

  • Chŏnch'ŏn-ŭp
  • Hangmu-rodongjagu
  • Hwaam-rodongjagu
  • Ku'il-lodongjagu
  • Sinjŏng-rodongjagu
  • Unsong-rodongjagu
  • Changrim-ri
  • Chinp'yŏng-ri
  • Ch'angdŏng-ri
  • Ch'angp'yŏng-ri
  • Hoedŏng-ri
  • Hwaryong-ri
  • Mup'yŏng-ri
  • Rimal-li
  • Singye-ri
  • Unp'o-ri
  • Waul-li

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Ukraine and Central Asia.

Coordinates: 40°36′56″N126°27′47″E / 40.6155°N 126.4630°E / 40.6155; 126.4630

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.


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