Chongchon River

Last updated
Chongchon River
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised Romanization Cheongcheon-gang
McCune–Reischauer Ch'ŏngch'ŏn'gang

The Ch'ŏngch'ŏn is a river of North Korea having its source in the Rangrim Mountains of Chagang Province and emptying into the Yellow Sea at Sinanju. The river flows past Myohyang-san and through the city of Anju, South P'yŏngan Province. Its total length is 217 km (135 mi), and it drains a basin of 9,553 km2 (3,688 sq mi).

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

The Rangnim Mountains are a mountain range stretching from north to south, west of the Kaema Highlands, in central North Korea. They are the source of several major rivers of North Korea, such as the Taedong and the Ch'ŏngch'ŏn. The mountain range is generally highest in the east, and falls towards the west. Its highest peak is Wagalbong, at 2,260 m.

Yellow Sea Sea in Northeast Asia between China and Korea

The Yellow Sea is located between China and Korea. The name is given to the northern part of the East China Sea, which is a marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean. It is located between mainland China and the Korean Peninsula. Its name comes from the sand particles from Gobi Desert sand storms that turn the surface of the water golden yellow.

Contents

Important Bird Area

The river's estuary has been identified by BirdLife International as an 8000 ha (19,768 acre) Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports significant numbers of the populations of various bird species. These include swan geese, bean geese, whooper swans, Oriental storks, black-faced spoonbills, Chinese egrets, great bustards, white-naped cranes, hooded cranes, red-crowned cranes, Far Eastern curlews and spotted greenshanks. The site includes the 800 ha (1,977 acre) Mundok Nature Reserve. [1]

BirdLife International is a global partnership of conservation organisations that strives to conserve birds, their habitats, and global biodiversity, working with people towards sustainability in the use of natural resources. It is the world's largest partnership of conservation organisations, with over 120 partner organisations.

Important Bird Area area recognized as being globally important habitat for the conservation of birds populations

An Important Bird and Biodiversity Area (IBA) is an area identified using an internationally agreed set of criteria as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations.

Swan goose species of bird

The swan goose is a rare large goose with a natural breeding range in inland Mongolia, northernmost China, and southeastern Russia. It is migratory and winters mainly in central and eastern China. Vagrant birds are encountered in Japan and Korea, and more rarely in Kazakhstan, Laos, coastal Siberia, Taiwan, Thailand and Uzbekistan.

Hydroelectric dams

North Korea is building 10 new hydroelectric dams on the Chongchon River to spur rapid development. [2]

Incidents

Goguryeo Former kingdom of Korea

Goguryeo, also called Goryeo, was a Korean kingdom located in the northern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula and the southern and central parts of Manchuria. Along with Baekje and Silla, Goguryeo was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. It was an active participant in the power struggle for control of the Korean peninsula and was also associated with the foreign affairs of neighboring polities in China and Japan.

The Battle of Salsu was a major battle that occurred in the year 612 during the second campaign of the Goguryeo–Sui War between Goguryeo of Korea and Sui of China. Goguryeo won an overwhelming victory over the numerically superior Sui forces at Salsu River.

Battle of the Chongchon River battle

The Battle of the Ch'ongch'on River, also known as the Battle of the Ch'ongch'on, was a decisive battle in the Korean War, and it took place from November 25 to December 2, 1950, along the Ch'ongch'on River Valley in the northwestern part of North Korea. In response to the successful Chinese First Phase Campaign against the United Nations forces, General Douglas MacArthur launched the Home-by-Christmas Offensive to expel the Chinese forces from Korea and to end the war. Anticipating this reaction, the Chinese People's Volunteer Army Commander Peng Dehuai planned a counteroffensive, dubbed the "Second Phase Campaign", against the advancing UN forces.

See also

Chong Chon Gang is a North Korean cargo ship, later renamed the Tong Hung San.

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Sirikit Dam dam in Thailand

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Amrok River estuary Important Bird Area

The Amrok River estuary Important Bird Area comprises the North Korean part of the Amrok, or Yalu, estuary, with an area of 7,000 ha, abutting the border with China on the north-eastern coast of the Yellow Sea. The site has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports up to 20,000 waterbirds. Birds for which the site is significant include swan geese, Baikal teal, black-faced spoonbills, white-naped cranes, red-crowned cranes and Far Eastern curlews. Only 1000 ha of the site is protected in a nature reserve.

Orangchon River estuary Important Bird Area

The Orangchon River estuary Important Bird Area comprises the 2500 ha estuary of the Orangchon River where it flows into the Sea of Japan in North Hamgyong Province on the north-eastern coast of North Korea.. The site has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports several waterbird species. Birds for which the site is significant include swan geese, bean geese, greater white-fronted geese, scaly-sided mergansers, white-naped cranes, red-crowned cranes and dunlins. 1500 ha of the site is protected in a nature reserve.

Kumya Bay Important Bird Area

The Kumya Bay Important Bird Area lies on the eastern coast of North Korea on the Sea of Japan. It comprises 4500 ha of estuarine waters, rivers, and saltpans, encompassing a 2000 ha protected area. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports significant populations of various birds, including swan geese, bean geese, greater white-fronted geese, mute swans, whooper swans, Steller's sea-eagles, white-naped cranes, and red-crowned cranes.

Ongjin Bay Important Bird Area

The Ongjin Bay Important Bird Area lies on the western coast of North Korea on the Yellow Sea, in Ongjin County, South Hwanghae. It comprises 3500 ha of wetlands, including rice paddies, and encompasses a 1000 ha protected area. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports significant populations of various birds, including swan geese, bean geese, greater white-fronted geese, Oriental storks, black-faced spoonbills, white-naped cranes, red-crowned cranes, long-billed plovers and Far Eastern curlews. It is threatened by aquacultural development.

Lake Kwangpo

Lake Kwangpo lies near the coast of South Hamgyong Province of North Korea. A 4500 ha site encompassing the lake, including adjacent rice paddies and the 2,000-hectare (4,900-acre) Lake Kwangpo Protected Area, has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of various water- and wetland birds. Birds for which the site is of conservation significance include swan geese, greater white-fronted geese, mute swans, whooper swans, grey herons, Swinhoe's rails, white-naped cranes and red-crowned cranes.

Lake Samilpo

Lake Samilpo is an 80 hectacre (ha) freshwater lake in south-eastern Kangwon Province in south-eastern North Korea. It lies about 2 kilometers (km) from the coast of the Sea of Japan and 9 km north-west of the border with South Korea. It is one of North Korea’s designated Natural Monuments. With its surrounds of temperate broadleaf and mixed forest, Lake Samilpo has also been identified by BirdLife International as a 160 ha Important Bird Area (IBA). The lake supports populations of wintering water and wetland birds. Species using the site include swan geese, greater white-fronted geese, mute swans, whooper swans and red-crowned cranes.

Lake Tungjong and Lake Chonapo Important Bird Area

The Lake Tungjong and Lake Chonapo Important Bird Area is a 2100 ha site lying on the western shore of the Sea of Japan, about 30 km east of the city of Wonsan in north-eastern Kangwon Province in North Korea. Part of it is protected as one of North Korea’s designated Natural Monuments. It comprises two coastal lagoons and was identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA), mainly because it supports populations of wintering water and wetland birds. Species using the site include swan geese, mute swans, whooper swans and red-crowned cranes.

Unnyul Kumsanpo

Ŭllyul Kŭmsanp'o is an 800 ha wetland wildlife reserve on the north-eastern shore of the Yellow Sea, on the west coast of North Korea in Ŭllyul County, South Hwanghae Province south of the estuary of the Taedong River. The site forms the core of a 1400 ha Important Bird Area (IBA), identified as such by BirdLife International because, with adjacent rice paddies, it supports populations of migrating and wintering water and wetland birds. Species using the site include swan geese, whooper swans, black-faced spoonbills, Chinese egrets, red-crowned cranes and Nordmann's greenshanks. The IBA is threatened by agricultural intensification.

Chongdan Field

Chongdan Field is a 1,000 ha wetland protected area in South Hwanghae Province of North Korea. It and its surrounds, including rice paddies, have been identified by BirdLife International as a 2500 ha Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of swan geese, whooper swans, black-faced spoonbills, red-crowned cranes, long-billed plovers, Far Eastern curlews and Nordmann's greenshanks.

Kangryong Field

Kangryong Field is a 1200 ha wetland site in South Hwanghae Province of North Korea. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of Oriental storks, black-faced spoonbills, Chinese egrets, red-crowned cranes and spoon-billed sandpipers.

Onchon Field

Onchon Field is a 50,000 ha wetland site in South Pyongan Province of North Korea. It contains freshwater wetlands, rice paddies and salt pans. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of swan geese, greater white-fronted geese, whooper swans, black-faced spoonbills, Chinese egrets, great bustards, white-naped cranes, hooded cranes and red-crowned cranes. It is threatened by agricultural intensification, aquacultural development and human disturbance.

Panmun Field

Panmun Field is an 8000 ha wetland site in southern North Hwanghae Province of North Korea, close to the city of Kaesong and the border with South Korea. It contains mainly rice paddies. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of swan geese, greater white-fronted geese, white-naped cranes, hooded cranes and red-crowned cranes. It is threatened by human disturbance.

Taedong River estuary Important Bird Area

The Taedong River estuary Important Bird Area is an 11,500 ha site in southern South Pyongan Province of North Korea, where the Taedong River meets the Yellow Sea. It has been identified by BirdLife International as an Important Bird Area (IBA) because it supports populations of various waterbirds. These include swan geese, mute swans, whooper swans, Baikal teals, Steller's sea-eagles, red-crowned cranes and Saunders's gulls. The site comprises a range of wetlands including freshwater lakes, salt pans and rice paddies. Threats to the IBA include agricultural intensification and aquacultural development.

References

  1. "Chongchon River estuary (including Mundok Nature Reserve)". Important Bird Areas factsheet. BirdLife International. 2013. Archived from the original on 10 July 2007. Retrieved 25 April 2013.
  2. "nknews- "North Korea building 10 new hydroelectric dams"". December 11, 2014. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
Korean Central News Agency news agency

The Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) is the state news agency of North Korea. The agency portrays the views of the North Korean government for both domestic and foreign consumption. It was established on December 5, 1946.

Coordinates: 39°36′00″N125°25′00″E / 39.60000°N 125.41667°E / 39.60000; 125.41667