Chonnae County

Last updated
Ch'ŏnnae County
천내군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Ch'ŏnnae-gun
   Revised Romanization Cheonnae-gun
NK-Gangwon-Chonnae.png
Map of Kangwon showing the location of Chonnae
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 3 workers' districts, 15 ri
Population (1991 est.)
  Total67,000

Ch'ŏnnae County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally part of Munch'ŏn, it was made a separate county as part of the general reorganization of local government in December 1952.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Physical features

Ch'ŏnnae borders the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea) to the east. Most of the terrain is mountainous, but there is level ground near the coast in the northeast. The chief stream is the Ch'ŏnt'an River (천탄강). The county's area is roughly 70% forestland.

Sea of Japan Marginal sea between Japan, Russia and Korea

The Sea of Japan is the marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula and Russia. The Japanese archipelago separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean. This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean. Few rivers discharge into the sea and their total contribution to the water exchange is within 1%.

Administrative divisions

Ch'ŏnnae county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 3 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 15 ri (villages):

  • Ch'ŏnnae-ŭp
  • Hwara-rodongjagu
  • Ryongdam-rodongjagu
  • Sinsal-lodongjagu
  • Changp'ung-ri
  • Hoebong-ri
  • Inhŭng-ri
  • Kŭmsŏng-ri
  • Kup'o-ri
  • P'ungjŏl-li
  • Roul-li
  • Ryongru-ri
  • Sinam-ri
  • Sinhŭng-ri
  • Sŭngjŏl-li
  • Taeyang-ri
  • Tangch'i-ri
  • Tonghŭng-ri
  • Yŏmjŏl-li

Economy

Agriculture

In the northeast, the dominant industry is agriculture. The chief local crops are rice, maize, and soybeans; sericulture (silk farming) and orcharding also play a role.

Agriculture Cultivation of plants and animals to provide useful products

Agriculture is the science and art of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at least 105,000 years ago, nascent farmers began to plant them around 11,500 years ago. Pigs, sheep and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Plants were independently cultivated in at least 11 regions of the world. Industrial agriculture based on large-scale monoculture in the twentieth century came to dominate agricultural output, though about 2 billion people still depended on subsistence agriculture into the twenty-first.

Rice cereal grain and seed of Oryza sativa

Rice is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa or Oryza glaberrima. As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia. It is the agricultural commodity with the third-highest worldwide production, after sugarcane and maize.

Maize Cereal grain

Maize, also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces pollen inflorescences and separate ovuliferous inflorescences called ears that yield kernels or seeds, which are fruits.

Mining

Mines extract local mineral deposits including limestone and anthracite.

Limestone Sedimentary rocks made of calcium carbonate

Limestone is a carbonate sedimentary rock that is often composed of the skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, foraminifera, and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). A closely related rock is dolostone, which contains a high percentage of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2. In fact, in old USGS publications, dolostone was referred to as magnesian limestone, a term now reserved for magnesium-deficient dolostones or magnesium-rich limestones.

Anthracite A hard, compact variety of coal that has a submetallic luster

Anthracite, often referred to as hard coal, is a hard, compact variety of coal that has a submetallic luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest energy density of all types of coal and is the highest ranking of coals.

Transport

The Kangwŏn Line of the Korean State Railway runs through Ch'ŏnnae county, with a short branchline connecting Ch'ŏnnae-ŭp to the mainline. The county is also served by roads. [1]

Kangwon Line railway line

The Kangwŏn Line is a 145.8 km (90.6 mi) electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway of North Korea, connecting Kowŏn on the P'yŏngra Line to P'yŏnggang, providing an east–west connection between the P'yŏngra and Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn lines.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Jang Hyuk, who has held the position since 2015.

See also

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References

  1. Road map of Korea, North and South, published December 2010 by Freytag and Berndt, Vienna, Austria, ISBN   978-3-7079-0974-6