Chris Cooley (American football)

Last updated

Chris Cooley
Chris cooley 2011.jpg
Cooley at Redskins training camp in 2011.
No. 47
Position: Tight end / Fullback
Personal information
Born: (1982-07-11) July 11, 1982 (age 36)
Powell, Wyoming
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:243 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High school: Logan (UT)
College: Utah State
NFL Draft: 2004  / Round: 3 / Pick: 81
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:429
Receiving yards:4,711
Receiving touchdowns:33
Player stats at NFL.com

Christopher Ken "Chris" Cooley (born July 11, 1982) is a former American football tight end who played for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Utah State University, and was drafted by the Redskins in the third round of the 2004 NFL draft. Cooley holds the Redskins' franchise record for most receptions at tight end.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Tight end position in American football, with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver

The tight end (TE) is a position in American football, arena football, and formerly Canadian football, on the offense. The tight end is often seen as a hybrid position with the characteristics and roles of both an offensive lineman and a wide receiver. Like offensive linemen, they are usually lined up on the offensive line and are large enough to be effective blockers. On the other hand, unlike offensive linemen, they are eligible receivers adept enough to warrant a defense's attention when running pass patterns.

Washington Redskins American football team based in the Washington, D.C. area

The Washington Redskins are a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The Redskins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team plays its home games at FedExField in Landover, Maryland; its headquarters and training facility are at Inova Sports Performance Center at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Virginia and the Redskins Complex in Richmond, Virginia, respectively.

Contents

Early years

Cooley attended Logan High School in Logan, Utah, and lettered in football, wrestling, and baseball. As a senior football tight end, he caught 45 passes for 625 yards (13.34 yards per rec. avg.) and on defense, added eight sacks and numerous tackles. In wrestling, he posted a 54–0 record his senior season and won the state championship and All-America honors.

Logan High School (Utah) public high school in Logan, Utah

Logan High School is a four-year public high school in the western United States, located in Logan, Utah. Established 101 years ago in 1917 as part of the Logan City School District, its campus is in the southwest part of the city. Logan High is currently in the Utah High School Activities Association (UHSAA) Class 4A Region XII and its mascot is a Grizzly.

Logan, Utah City in Utah, United States

Logan City, commonly referred to Logan, is a city in Cache County, Utah, United States. The 2010 census recorded the population was 48,174, with an estimated population of 48,997 in 2014. By 2050 the population of Logan is expected to double. Logan is the county seat of Cache County and the principal city of the Logan metropolitan area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 census. and was declared by Morgan Quitno in 2005 and 2007 to be the safest in the United States in those years. Logan also is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

Varsity letter

A varsity letter is an award earned in the United States for excellence in school activities. A varsity letter signifies that its winner was a qualified varsity team member, awarded after a certain standard was met.

College career

Cooley finished his college football career at Utah State University with 95 receptions for 1,255 yards (13.2 yards per reception). He was part of a talented receiving unit with teammate Kevin Curtis.

College football collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by student-athletes of American/Canadian colleges and universities

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Utah State University university

Utah State University is a public land-grant research university in Logan, Utah. It is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. With nearly 20,000 students living on or near campus, USU is Utah's largest public residential campus. As of Fall 2017, there were 27,679 students enrolled including 24,618 undergraduate students and 3,061 graduate students. The university has the highest percentage of out-of-state students of any public university in Utah totaling 23% of the student body.

Kevin Curtis American football player

Kevin DeeVon Curtis is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Utah State and was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in the third round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He also played for the Philadelphia Eagles, Miami Dolphins, Kansas City Chiefs and Tennessee Titans.

In 2003, his senior season at Utah State, Cooley led the NCAA in receptions by a tight end.

National Collegiate Athletic Association Non-profit organization that regulates many American college athletes and programs

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,268 North American institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

In 2017 he was inducted into the Utah State University Athletics Hall of Fame. [1]

Professional career

2004 season

In 2004, Cooley was drafted in the third round, with the 81st overall pick, of the 2004 NFL Draft by the Washington Redskins. After being used sparingly in the first half of the 2004 season, Cooley began to be used more extensively in the last eight games, developing a rapport with Redskins quarterback Patrick Ramsey. In his first NFL season, Cooley led the team in touchdowns with six, while recording 37 receptions for 314 yards, catching three passes of more than twenty yards, and getting 23 first downs. He finished the season with an average of 8.5 yards per catch. He was the Redskins' nominee for the NFL Man of the Year award [2] for his work reading to children and feeding the poor. He is also lesser known by the nickname "Johnny White Guy," which was given to him by Clinton Portis during one of Portis' colorful press conferences, but the off color nickname did not stick.

The 2004 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League.

2004 NFL Draft

The 2004 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 24–25, 2004 at the Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York City. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year.

Patrick Ramsey American football player

Patrick Allen Ramsey is a former American football quarterback. He was drafted by the Washington Redskins 32nd overall in the 2002 NFL Draft. He played college football at Tulane.

2005 season

During the 2005 season, Cooley had a solid season as a receiver, catching 71 passes for 774 yards and seven touchdowns, including three in a game versus the rival Dallas Cowboys, breaking the Redskins franchise record for receptions as a tight end in a single season. [3] Those three touchdowns cost Cooley his fantasy football playoff game, because his opponent had Cooley on his fantasy team. [4] He led all NFC tight ends in fan voting for the annual Pro Bowl with 422,314 votes, but following player and coach voting (each group had 1/3 weight), was not chosen for the position. He was named first team All-NFC by Pro Football Weekly. [5]

Cooley at Redskins training camp in 2006. Chris Cooley at Redskins training camp, August 2006.jpg
Cooley at Redskins training camp in 2006.

2006 season

In 2006, Cooley got off to a slow start under the play-calling of the Washington Redskins' new offensive coordinator, Al Saunders. With only three receptions in the first two weeks of the season, Cooley appeared to not have a place in the new offensive scheme, but in the weeks following, became a growing part of the Redskins offense. He ended the season with numbers slightly less than his sophomore outing, but was still one of the top tight ends in the game.

2007 season

On September 1, 2007, Cooley signed a six-year $30 million contract extension. [6] In 2007, he had scored in all but one game as of week six. In the sixth week, Cooley had 9 receptions for a career-high 105 yards and one touchdown in a 17-14 loss against the Green Bay Packers. On December 18, 2007 he was named to the 2007 Pro Bowl team with Redskins tackle Chris Samuels, long-snapper Ethan Albright, and the late safety Sean Taylor. Cooley set an NFL record by being the only tight end in league history to have six or more touchdowns in each of his first four seasons.

Cooley with Mike Sellers at the 2009 Pro Bowl Cooley sellers 2009probowl.jpg
Cooley with Mike Sellers at the 2009 Pro Bowl

2008 season

In 2008, Cooley scored only one touchdown. In Week 5, he had 8 receptions for a career-high 109 yards and one touchdown from a pass from Antwaan Randle El in a 23–17 win against the Philadelphia Eagles. Cooley finished the season with 83 catches for 849 yards and 1 touchdown, with career highs in both catches and yardage. He was the only player not to get into the stat book in the 2009 Pro Bowl.

2009 season

Cooley broke his ankle in a Monday Night Football matchup against the Philadelphia Eagles on October 26, 2009. [7] It was initially speculated that Cooley would miss the remainder of the 2009 season. On October 27, 2009, Cooley commented via Twitter that the break may not have been as bad as originally thought and that he could possibly return in as little as four weeks. [8] His longest play of the year was a 66-yard touchdown. On November 30, 2009, Cooley was placed on injured reserve.

2010 season

Cooley played in all sixteen games of 2010 season, but had arthroscopic surgery on his left knee after the season on January 3, 2011. [9]

2011 season

Still recovering from the arthroscopic surgery to his left knee, Cooley did not play in any of the preseason games in 2011. Cooley played only in the 2011 season's first five games. After the win in Week 1 against the New York Giants, Cooley became the Washington Redskins' all-time leader in receptions at the tight end position with 422 receptions, breaking the previous franchise record of 421 set by Jerry Smith. [10] In Week 3 against the Dallas Cowboys, Cooley subbed in for Darrel Young and Mike Sellers, who were both injured, and played the fullback position for the first time in his career. [11] In Week 6 against the Philadelphia Eagles, Cooley suffered a broken finger. [12] On October 25, 2011, Cooley was placed on injured reserve after his knee was examined further by his doctor and was told that it would take another four or five weeks before full recovery. [13]

2012 season

During the preseason, it was reported that Cooley's knee was completely healed from the surgery and that he even lost 20 pounds to prepare for the 2012 season. [14] However, Cooley was released by the Redskins on August 28, 2012. [15] It had been hinted by general manager Bruce Allen that Cooley could return to the Redskins. [16] [17] [18]

On October 21, 2012, Cooley agreed to re-sign with the Redskins after Fred Davis tore his Achilles tendon and was done for the season. [19] [20]

Statistics

YearTeamGGSRecYdsAvgLngTD
2004 Washington Redskins169373148.5316
2005 Washington Redskins16167177410.9327
2006 Washington Redskins16165773412.9666
2007 Washington Redskins16166678611.9398
2008 Washington Redskins16168384910.2281
2009 Washington Redskins772933211.4252
2010 Washington Redskins16157784911.0353
2011 Washington Redskins558658.1170
2012 Washington Redskins8018880
TOTAL116944294,71111.06633

Retirement and post-playing career

On July 16, 2013, The Washington Post reported that Cooley was retiring from the NFL. The Post further reported that Cooley would join the Washington Redskins' radio broadcast team as an analyst. [21]

Cooley also co-hosted "Cooley & Kevin", a morning drive time sports show on ESPN 980 in D. C., with Kevin Sheehan. [22] The show was cancelled in 2018. [23] Cooley now hosts his own podcast, Cooley at the Park, in which he discusses Redskins and NFL news and breaks down each week's game film. He also produces weekly film review segments on the Redskins' official website.

Comeback attempt

On August 11, 2015, it was reported that Cooley expressed interest into returning to the NFL after working out at the Redskins facility during the off season. Cooley never officially retired from the NFL after not being re-signed by the Redskins in 2013. After playing only with the Redskins throughout his entire career, he was afraid to tarnish his legacy by joining another team. [24]

On September 29, 2015, Cooley attended a workout for the New York Giants. [25]

Personal life

Cooley resides in Hamilton, Virginia.

Though he has previously attended The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he has not been a "Mormon" since at least 2004. [26] [27] He and his first wife Angela divorced in 2005. [28] Later that year, he started dating Redskinnette (Redskin cheerleader) Christy Oglevee. She was fired for fraternizing with Redskins players, which the Redskins organization prohibits. [29] They married on May 23, 2008 in Landsdowne, Virginia. [30] In January 2012 they separated [31] and in September they announced their intent to divorce. [32]

Cooley's first child, daughter Sloane, was born on September 11, 2014. [33]

Cooley, frequently referred to by his nickname "Captain Chaos," is known for his eccentric hair styles, affinity for heavy metal music, and what one reporter has called an " Animal House persona". This nickname was created when teammates bet him he would not go out to the opening coin toss and introduce himself to the opposing team captains as "Captain Chaos". [34] Cooley did so and the nickname stuck.

Cooley maintains his own blog, "The Cooley Zone." On Sunday, September 14, 2008, Cooley posted on his blog a photo of Redskins training materials that also included his genitals. The picture remained on his site all day Sunday until it was finally removed. Cooley apologized and referred to the incident as "a complete accident", claiming that he initially posted the photo without realizing it showed his genitals. [35] [36] He at one time maintained an online store through eBay, featuring jerseys, cards, and other personalized memorabilia. Cooley is an avid trading card collector, a hobby he rediscovered while searching for Chris Cooley football cards. [37]

Cooley is executive producer of the independent film Ghosts Don't Exist , which began production in May 2009. [38] He was featured in an episode of Jake and Amir for the comedy website CollegeHumor. [39]

Cooley majored in art at Utah State, and now pursues a side career as a potter. He owns an art gallery in Leesburg. [40]

Cooley made several appearances in TV commercials for Easterns Automotive Group, a local car dealership group on the DC and Baltimore areas, alongside Clinton Portis, Antwaan Randle El and Jason Campbell. [41]

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References

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Further reading