Christian Marquand

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Christian Marquand (15 March 1927 – 22 November 2000) was a French actor, screenwriter and film director. Born in Marseille, he was born to a Spanish father and an Arab mother, and his sister was film director Nadine Trintignant. [1] He was often cast as a heartthrob in French films of the 1950s.

Marseille Second-largest city of France and prefecture of Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur

Marseille is the second largest city in France after Paris. The main city of the historical province of Provence, it is the prefecture of the department of Bouches-du-Rhône and region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. It is located on the Mediterranean coast near the mouth of the Rhône. The city covers an area of 241 km2 (93 sq mi) and had a population of 869,815 in 2016. Its metropolitan area, which extends over 3,173 km2 (1,225 sq mi) is the third-largest in France after those of Paris and Lyon, with a population of 1,831,500 as of 2010.

Nadine Trintignant French film director

Nadine Trintignant is a French film director, producer, editor, screenwriter, and novelist. She is known for making films that surround the topic of family and relationships, such as Ça n'arrive qu'aux autres and L'été prochain. Her film Mon amour, mon amour was nominated for the Palme d'Or at the 1967 Cannes Film Festival.

Contents

Career

Marquand's first film appearance was in 1946, as a footman in Jean Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bête). After a few more small parts, he was prominently featured in Christian-Jaque's Lucrèce Borgia (1953) as one of Lucrezia's lovers, and as an Austrian soldier in Luchino Visconti's Senso (1954).

Jean Cocteau French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker

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<i>Beauty and the Beast</i> traditional fairy tale

Beauty and the Beast is a fairy tale written by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve and published in 1740 in La Jeune Américaine et les contes marins. Its lengthy version was abridged, rewritten, and published first by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont in 1756 in Magasin des enfants and by Andrew Lang in the Blue Fairy Book of his Fairy Book series in 1889, to produce the version(s) most commonly retold. It was influenced by some earlier stories, such as "Cupid and Psyche", The Golden Ass written by Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis in the 2nd century AD, and "The Pig King", an Italian fairytale published by Giovanni Francesco Straparola in The Facetious Nights of Straparola.

Christian-Jaque was a French filmmaker. From 1954 to 1959, he was married to actress Martine Carol, who starred in several of his films, including Lucrèce Borgia (1953), Madame du Barry (1954), and Nana (1955).

In 1956, he was directed by Roger Vadim in And God Created Woman (Et Dieu... créa la femme) opposite Brigitte Bardot. That film's success led to starring roles in the movies No Sun in Venice (1957), Temptation (1959), and The Big Show (1960) and leads opposite actresses Maria Schell, Jean Seberg, and Annie Girardot.

Roger Vadim Film director, screenwriter, producer

Roger Vadim was a French screenwriter, film director and producer, as well as an author, artist and occasional actor. His best-known works are visually lavish films with erotic qualities, such as And God Created Woman (1956), Barbarella (1968), and Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971).

<i>And God Created Woman</i> (1956 film) 1956 film by Roger Vadim

And God Created Woman (1956) is a French drama film directed by Roger Vadim and starring Brigitte Bardot. Though not her first film, it is widely recognized as the vehicle that launched Bardot into the public spotlight and immediately created her "sex kitten" persona, making her an overnight sensation.

Brigitte Bardot French model, actor, singer and animal rights activist

Brigitte Anne-Marie Bardot, often referred to by the initials B.B., is a French former actress and singer, and animal rights activist. Famous for portraying sexually emancipated personae with hedonistic lifestyles, she was one of the best known sex symbols of the 1950s and 1960s. Although she withdrew from the entertainment industry in 1973, she remains a major popular culture icon.

In 1962, Marquand appeared as French Naval Commando leader Philippe Kieffer in Darryl F. Zanuck's World War II movie The Longest Day , which led to further roles in international productions such as Behold a Pale Horse (1964), Lord Jim (1965) and The Flight of the Phoenix (1965).

Philippe Kieffer French naval officer

Philippe Kieffer, capitaine de frégate in the French Navy, was a French officer and political personality, and a hero of the Free French Forces.

Darryl F. Zanuck American film producer

Darryl Francis Zanuck was an American film producer and studio executive; he earlier contributed stories for films starting in the silent era. He played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors. He earned three Academy Awards as producer for Best Picture during his tenure, but was responsible for many more.

<i>The Longest Day</i> (film) 1962 film

The Longest Day is a 1962 epic war film based on Cornelius Ryan's 1959 book The Longest Day (1959) about the D-Day landings at Normandy on June 6, 1944, during World War II. The film was produced by Darryl F. Zanuck, who paid author Ryan $175,000 for the film rights. The screenplay was by Ryan, with additional material written by Romain Gary, James Jones, David Pursall, and Jack Seddon. It was directed by Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton, and Bernhard Wicki.

He appeared in feature films and television throughout the 1970s, and played a French plantation owner in Francis Ford Coppola's re-edited Vietnam war epic Apocalypse Now Redux (1979/2001). His last performance was in a 1987 French TV mini-series. He directed two films, Les Grands Chemins (1963) and the all-star sex farce Candy (1968).

Francis Ford Coppola American film director and producer

Francis Ford Coppola is an American film director, producer, screenwriter, film composer, and vintner. He was a central figure in the New Hollywood filmmaking movement of the 1960s and 1970s.He is widely considered to be one of the greatest filmmakers of all time.

<i>Apocalypse Now Redux</i> 2001 extended version of Apocalypse Now directed by Francis Ford Coppola

Apocalypse Now Redux is a 2001 extended version of Francis Ford Coppola's epic war film Apocalypse Now, which was originally released in 1979. Coppola, along with editor/longtime collaborator Walter Murch, added 49 minutes of material that had been removed from the original film. It represents a significant re-edit of the original version.

Les Grands Chemins is a 1951 novel by the French writer Jean Giono. It was the basis for the 1963 film Of Flesh and Blood, directed by Christian Marquand.

Personal life

Marquand was married to French actress, Tina Aumont from 1963 to 1966. In the 1970s, he lived with French actress Dominique Sanda, with whom he had a son, Yann. He was a close friend of Marlon Brando, who named his son Christian after him, as did French director Roger Vadim. [2]

Tina Aumont French actress

Maria Christina Aumont was an American actress, born in Hollywood, California, to French actor Jean-Pierre Aumont, and Dominican actress Maria Montez.

Dominique Sanda actress

Dominique Marie-Françoise Renée Varaigne, professionally known as Dominique Sanda, is a French actress and former fashion model.

Marlon Brando American actor, film director, and activist

Marlon Brando Jr. was an American actor and film director. With a career spanning 60 years, during which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor twice, he is well-regarded for his cultural influence on 20th-century film. Brando was an activist for many causes, notably the civil rights movement and various Native American movements. Having studied with Stella Adler in the 1940s, he is credited with being one of the first actors to bring the Stanislavski system of acting and Method Acting, derived from the Stanislavski system, to mainstream audiences.

Marquand died near Paris of Alzheimer's disease, aged 73.

Selected filmography

Notes

  1. https://www.theguardian.com/news/2000/dec/02/guardianobituaries1
  2. p. 229 Ellis, Chris & Ellis, Julie The Mammoth Book of Celebrity Murder: Murder Played Out in the Spotlight of Maximum Publicity Berghahn Books, 2005

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