Christy Ring Cup

Last updated

Christy Ring Cup
Founded2005–present
CountryFlag of Ireland.svg  Ireland
Number of teams8
Level on pyramid3
Promotion to Joe McDonagh Cup
Relegation to Nicky Rackard Cup
Current champions Kildare
(2020)
Most championships Westmeath, Kildare, Carlow (3 titles)
TV partners TG4
Website Official GAA site
Current: 2020 Christy Ring Cup

The Christy Ring Cup (Irish : Corn Chriostóir Uí Rinn) [1] is an annual hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. Originally introduced as a second tier competition, it is currently the third tier overall in the inter-county hurling championship system. Each year, the champions of the Christy Ring Cup are promoted to the Joe McDonagh Cup, and the lowest finishing team is relegated to the Nicky Rackard Cup. Kildare are the 2020 title-holders.

Contents

The Christy Ring Cup, which was introduced in 2005, replaced the All-Ireland B Hurling Championship (1974-2004). Between 2005 and 2017 the Christy Ring Cup was the second tier hurling championship. With the introduction of the Joe McDonagh cup, the Christy Ring Cup is the highest tier of the championship system without entry to that year's All-Ireland finals series (the top two teams in the Joe McDonagh Cup usually gain entry to preliminary quarter-finals of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship).

At present (2020), Down, Kildare and Wicklow hold the longest tenures in the Christy Ring Cup. They have appeared in every season of the cup.

History

For history before 2004, see All-Ireland Senior B Hurling Championship

In 2003 the Hurling Development Committee (HDC) was charged with restructuring the entire hurling championship. The committee was composed of chairman Pat Dunny (Kildare), Liam Griffin (Wexford), P. J. O'Grady (Limerick), Ger Loughnane (Clare), Cyril Farrell (Galway), Jimmy O'Reilly (Down), Willie Ring (Cork), Pat Daly (GAA Games Development Officer) and Nicky English (Tipperary). Over the course of three months they held discussions with managers, players and officials, while also taking a submission from the Gaelic Players Association. The basic tenet of the proposals was to structure the hurling championship into three tiers in accordance with 2004 National Hurling League status. The top tier was confined to 12 teams, while the next ten teams would contest the second tier which was to be known as the Christy Ring Cup. There would also be promotion-relegation play-offs between the three championship tiers. The HDC also suggested that these games would be played as curtain raisers to All-Ireland quarter-finals and semi-finals. [2]

The proposal were accepted at the 2004 GAA Congress. The Christy Ring Cup and the Nicky Rackard Cup competitions were launched at Croke Park on 8 December 2004.

Format

2005-2007

The ten participating teams were divided into two groups of five and played in a round-robin format. Each team was guaranteed at least four games each. The eventual group winners and runners-up qualified for the knock-out semi-finals of the competition.

The bottom two teams of both groups were involved in a four-way relegation play-off with the eventual loser being relegated to the Nicky Rackard Cup. In 2006 the relegation play-off was limited to just the bottom teams in both groups, while in 2007 there was no relegation.

2008

The competition was expanded to include twelve teams. The participating teams were divided into four groups of three and played in a round-robin format, thus limiting each team to just two games each. The eventual group winners and runners-up qualified for the knock-out quarter-finals of the competition.

The bottom team in each group went into the relegation play-offs. The eventual losers were relegated to the Nicky Rackard Cup, however, the relegation play-offs in 2008 were rendered meaningless as all four bottom-placed teams were relegated.

2009-2017

In 2009 a double elimination format was introduced, thus guaranteeing each team at least two games before being eliminated from the competition.

The eight teams play four Round 1 matches.

There are two Round 2A matches.

There are two Round 2B matches.

There are two quarter-final matches between the Round 2A losers and Round 2B winners.

There are two semi-final matches between the Round 2A winners and the quarter-final winners.

The winners of the final (with the exception of Down in 2013, are promoted to the Liam MacCarthy Cup for the following year.

From 2018

2018 saw the reintroduction of a group phase format to all tiers of the hurling Championship structure. The eight participating teams are divided into two groups of four and will play in a round-robin format. Each team will be guaranteed at least three games each. The eventual group winners and runners-up will qualify for the knock-out semi-finals of the championship.

2020 and the coronavirus pandemic

The Coronavirus pandemic in 2020 significantly affected the GAA season, with the Chisty Ring Cup reverting for one season only to the partial double elimination format that existed until 2017.

Champions, Runners-Up and Relegated Teams By Year

SeasonChampionsScoreRunner-upScoreVenueWinning captainLosing captainRelegated team(s)
2005 Westmeath 1-23 Down 2-18 Croke Park John Shaw Simon Wilson Derry
2006 Antrim 5-13 Carlow 1-07 Croke Park Karl McKeegan Robbie Foley Roscommon
2007 Westmeath 2-15 Kildare 0-13 Croke Park Darren McCormack Colm BuggyN/A
2008 Carlow 3-22 Westmeath 4-16 O'Connor Park Edward Coady Brendan Murtagh Armagh, London, Meath, Roscommon
2009 Carlow 1-15 Down 0-14 Croke Park Mark Brennan Graham Clarke N/A
2010 Westmeath 2-16 Kerry 1-18 Croke Park Andrew Mitchell Colin Harris N/A
2011 Kerry 2-21 Wicklow 2-08 Croke Park Mikey Boyle Jonathan O'Neill Armagh
2012 London 4-18 Wicklow 1-17 Croke Park Colm QuinnEnan GlynnN/A
2013 Down 3-16 Kerry 2-17 Croke Park Paul Braniff Paud CostelloN/A
2014 Kildare 4-18 Kerry 2-22 Croke Park Niall Ó Muineacháin John Egan N/A
2015 Kerry 1-20 Derry 0-12 Croke Park John Griffin Seán MacCullagh Mayo
2016
(R)
Meath 2-17
4-21
Antrim 1-20
5-17
Croke Park James Toher Neal McAuley Derry
2017 Carlow 5-23 Antrim 4-15 Croke Park Marty Kavanagh Conor Carson Roscommon
2018 Kildare 3-19 London 1-11 Croke Park Brian ByrneLiam Gavaghan Armagh & Mayo
2019 Meath 4-19 Down 2-15 Croke Park Seán GeraghtyStephen Keith Donegal
2020 Kildare 3-16 Down 0-22 Croke Park Brian ByrneStephen Keith

Winners Table

TeamWonRunner-upYears wonYears runner-up
Colours of Westmeath.svg Westmeath 31 2005, 2007, 2010 2008
Colours of Carlow.svg Carlow 31 2008, 2009, 2017 2006
Colours of Kildare.svg Kildare 31 2014, 2018, 2020 2007
Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 23 2011, 2015 2010, 2013, 2014
Colours of Meath.svg Meath 20 2016, 2019
Colours of Down.svg Down 14 2013 2005, 2009, 2019, 2020
Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 12 2006 2016, 2017
Colours of London.svg London 11 2012 2018
Colours of Wicklow.svg Wicklow 02 2011, 2012
Colours of Derry.svg Derry 01 2015

Wins by Province

ProvinceWinsLast winBiggest contributorWins
1 Flag of Leinster.svg Leinster 11 2020 Colours of Carlow.svg Carlow, Colours of Westmeath.svg Westmeath 3
2 Flag of Munster.svg Munster 2 2015 Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 2
3 Flag of Ulster.svg Ulster 2 2013 Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim, Colours of Down.svg Down 1
4Other1 2012 Colours of London.svg London 1
5 Flag of Connacht.svg Connacht 0--0

Top scorers

Top Scorers Overall

SeasonTop scorerTeamScoreTotal
2005 Mattie Dowd Colours of Kildare.svg Kildare 2-3945
2006 Paul Braniff Colours of Down.svg Down 6-2644
2007 Shane Brick Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry
2008 Brendan Murtagh Colours of Westmeath.svg Westmeath 2-3743
2009 Shane Brick Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-4245
2010 Darragh O'Connell Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-3841
2011 Darragh O'Connell Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-3336
2012 Martin Finn Colours of London.svg London 5-2944
2013 Paul Braniff Colours of Down.svg Down 3-3443
2014 Mikey Lee Colours of Tipperary.svg Wicklow 4-3850
2015 Shane Nolan Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 2-3541
2016 Ciarán Clarke Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 3-4352
2017 Denis Murphy Colours of Carlow.svg Carlow 0-4545

Top Scorers In The Final

SeasonTop scorerTeamScoreTotal
2005 Andrew Mitchell Colours of Westmeath.svg Westmeath 0-99
2006 Johnny McIntosh Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 2-410
2007 Billy White Colours of Kildare.svg Kildare 0-77
2008 Brendan Murtagh Colours of Westmeath.svg Westmeath 2-1016
2009 Simon Wilson Colours of Down.svg Down 0-77
2010 Darragh O'Connell Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 0-88
2011 Darragh O'Connell Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-912
2012 Jonathan Maher Colours of London.svg London 3-413
2013 Shane Nolan Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-912
2014 Shane Nolan Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-47
Gerry Keegan Colours of Kildare.svg Kildare 1-47
2015 Shane Nolan Colours of Kerry.svg Kerry 1-811
2016 James Toher Colours of Meath.svg Meath 0-1212
2017 Ciarán Clarke Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 2-915
2018 James Burke Colours of Kildare.svg Kildare 0-88
2019 Paul Sheehan Colours of Down.svg Down 1-811

See also

Related Research Articles

The Nicky Rackard Cup is the fourth-highest senior inter-county championship overall in hurling. Each year, the champion team in the Nicky Rackard Cup is promoted to the Christy Ring Cup, and the lowest finishing team enters a play-off with possible relegation to the Lory Meagher Cup.

The 2006 Christy Ring Cup was the second staging of the Christy Ring Cup, the Gaelic Athletic Association's inter-county hurling tournament for second tier teams. The cup began on 3 June 2006 and ended on 6 August 2006.

The 2007 Christy Ring Cup began on Saturday, 9 June 2007. The Christy Ring Cup is an annual hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association since 2005 for middle-ranking hurling teams in Ireland. The 2007 competition was won by Westmeath GAA.

The 2009 Nicky Rackard Cup is the 5th annual third-tier hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. Seven county teams and one regional team participate in the competition. The teams are Fingal, Monaghan, Louth, Sligo, Meath, London, Armagh and Roscommon.

The 2009 Christy Ring Cup is the 5th annual second-tier hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. Eight county teams participate in the competition. The teams are Carlow, Derry, Down, Kerry, Mayo, Kildare, Westmeath and Wicklow.

The 2010 Nicky Rackard Cup is the 6th annual third-tier hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. The teams competing are Armagh, Fingal, London, Louth, Monaghan, Roscommon, Sligo and Tyrone. The 2009 champions, Meath were promoted to the Christy Ring Cup for 2010, and did not have the opportunity to defend their title. 2009 Lory Meagher Cup champions, Tyrone, were promoted to play in the Nicky Rackard Cup this year. Due to a disagreement over promotion and relegation from the All-Ireland series, no team was relegated from the 2009 Christy Ring Cup or 2009 Nicky Rackard Cup for the 2010 season.

The 2010 Christy Ring Cup is the sixth staging of Ireland's second-tier hurling competition. Carlow were the reigning champions; however, they did not get the chance to defend their title due to their promotion to the GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship.

2012 Christy Ring Cup

The 2012 Christy Ring Cup was the eighth season of the Christy Ring Cup since its establishment in 2005.

The 2014 Nicky Rackard Cup is the tenth staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The cup competition began on 26 April 2014 and will end on 14 June 2014.

The 2015 Christy Ring Cup was the eleventh staging of the Christy Ring Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The cup competition began on 2 May 2015 and ended on 6 June 2014.

The 2015 Nicky Rackard Cup was the eleventh staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The cup competition began on 2 May 2015 and culminated on 13 June 2015. The bottom two teams will play off with the loser playing the winner of the 2015 Lory Meagher Cup.

The 2016 Christy Ring Cup was the 12th staging of the Christy Ring Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The competition began on Saturday 23 April 2016 and ended on Saturday 25 June 2016.

The 2016 Nicky Rackard Cup was the 12th staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The competition began on Saturday 23 April 2016 and ended on Saturday 4 June 2016.

The 2017 Nicky Rackard Cup was the 13th staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. It is the third tier of senior inter-county championship hurling.

The 2017 Christy Ring Cup was the 13th staging of the Christy Ring Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. The competition began on 22 April 2017 and ended on 10 June 2017.

The 2018 Christy Ring Cup was the 14th staging of the Christy Ring Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. It is the third tier of senior inter-county hurling. The competition began on 12 May 2018 and ended on 23 June 2018.

The Joe McDonagh Cup is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It forms the second tier of the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship, and is the second highest level of inter-county championship hurling competition in Ireland. The last of the five tiers to be established, the competition was contested for the first time in 2018.

The 2018 Nicky Rackard Cup was the 14th staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. It was the fourth tier of senior inter-county hurling as of 2018.

The 2019 Christy Ring Cup was the 15th staging of the Christy Ring Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. It is the third tier of senior inter-county hurling.

The 2019 Nicky Rackard Cup is the 15th staging of the Nicky Rackard Cup hurling championship since its establishment by the Gaelic Athletic Association in 2005. It is the fourth tier of senior inter-county hurling as of 2019.

References

  1. "Ár gCluichí, Ár Laochra #5 - Niall Ó Muineacháin". www.gaa.ie.
  2. Keys, Colm (10 December 2003). "Hurling evangelists have radical tiers in their eyes". Irish Independent. Retrieved 30 August 2015.