Chuang Yin-ching

Last updated
Chuang Yin-ching Chuang Yin-ching portlate.jpg
Chuang Yin-ching

Kenneth Chuang Yin-ching (Chinese :莊銀清) is a Taiwanese epidemiologist. As of January 2020, he leads the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (TCDC) Communicable Disease Control Medical Network. [1]

Contents

Career

Chuang earned a degree in medicine at Kaohsiung Medical University, and completed his residency at Taipei Veterans General Hospital. He specialized in epidemiology and infectious diseases while teaching at National Cheng Kung University. Chuang was the superintendent of Chi Mei Medical Center  [ zh ], Liouying branch. [2]

COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan

Chuang rose to prominence during the COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan. Chuang and two colleagues issued on 16 January a level-2 travel alert for Wuhan, China because of his and his colleague's three-day long on-the-ground experience in that city from 13 January to 15 January 2020. [3] [1] [4] They told a news conference in Taipei one day later that 30 percent of the Wuhan patients had no direct exposure to the Huanan Seafood City market (HSCM), which the Chinese authorities indicate as the epicenter of the outbreak. [1] [4] The Chinese had closed down the HSCM on 1 January. [3]

Chuang's revelation on 16 January predates by three days the Chinese confirmation of human-to-human transmission. On 20–21 January the World Health Organization then sent to Wuhan a delegation, which reported on 22 January that human-to-human transmission was indeed occurring. [3]

The Chinese government allowed a total of ten foreign medical officials to visit, including two from Taiwan, one of whom was Chuang. The eight others were from Hong Kong and Macau. [3] [5]

At the 16 January conference, Chuang remarked on the case of "a married couple infected in Wuhan. The husband worked at the market, but the wife, who had not recently been to the market due to limited mobility, might have contracted the illness from her husband." [1] [4] Chuang also was among the first to report that the SARS-CoV-2 infections were occurring in clusters. [4]

Chuang stated later, in an interview for The Daily Telegraph that: [3]

Initially… the chairperson of the meeting, tried to deny human to human transmission but finally the person from the central government health authority said 'why do you give an old conclusion? Now the conclusion is that limited human to human transmission cannot be excluded'. For me that was very important information.

Chuang "received no response to his questions about why 13 infections could not be traced to the (HSCM) seafood market." [3]

The WHO declared a PHEIC on 30 January.

Related Research Articles

Severe acute respiratory syndrome Disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral respiratory disease of zoonotic origin caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, the first identified strain of the SARS coronavirus species severe acute respiratory syndrome–related coronavirus (SARSr-CoV). The syndrome caused the 2002–2004 SARS outbreak. Around late 2017, Chinese scientists traced the virus through the intermediary of Asian palm civets to cave-dwelling horseshoe bats in Xiyang Yi Ethnic Township, Yunnan.

2002–2004 SARS outbreak Epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome originating in China

The 2002–2004 SARS outbreak was an epidemic involving severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The outbreak was first identified in Foshan, Guangdong, China, on 16 November 2002.

Yuen Kwok-yung Hong Kong microbiologist and physician

Yuen Kwok-yung is a Hong Kong microbiologist, physician and surgeon. He is a prolific researcher, with most of his nearly 800 papers related to research on novel microbes or emerging infectious diseases. He led a team identifying the SARS coronavirus that caused the SARS pandemic of 2003–4, and traced its genetic origins to wild bats. During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, he has acted as expert adviser to the Hong Kong government.

Taiwan Centers for Disease Control Government agency of Taiwan

The Taiwan Centers for Disease Control is the agency of the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Republic of China (Taiwan) that combats the threat of communicable diseases.

Wildlife trade and zoonoses Health risks associated with the trade in exotic wildlife

Wildlife trafficking practices have resulted in the emergence of zoonotic diseases. Exotic wildlife trafficking is a multi-billion dollar industry that involves the removal and shipment of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and fish all over the world. Traded wild animals are used for bushmeat consumption, unconventional exotic pets, animal skin clothing accessories, home trophy decorations, privately owned zoos, and for traditional medicine practices. Dating back centuries, people from Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Europe have used animal bones, horns, or organs for their believed healing effects on the human body. Wild tigers, rhinos, elephants, pangolins, and certain reptile species are acquired through legal and illegal trade operations in order to continue these historic cultural healing practices. Within the last decade nearly 975 different wild animal taxa groups have been legally and illegally exported out of Africa and imported into areas like China, Japan, Indonesia, the United States, Russia, Europe, and South America.

Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market Market in Wuhan, Hubei, China

The Wuhan Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, simply known as the Huanan Seafood Market, was a live animal and seafood market in Jianghan District, Wuhan City, the capital of Hubei Province in Central China.

Timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in January 2020 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in January 2020, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.

COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in mainland China

The COVID-19 pandemic in mainland China is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). China was the first country to identify the disease and its pathogen, the first country to impose drastic measures in response to the outbreak, and one of the first countries to bring the outbreak under control. The outbreak was first manifested as a cluster of mysterious pneumonia cases, mostly related to the Huanan Seafood Market, in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province. The outbreak was first reported to the local government on 27 December 2019 and published on 31 December. On 8 January 2020, a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was identified as the cause of the pneumonia by Chinese scientists.

COVID-19 Disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The first known case was identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. The disease has since spread worldwide, leading to an ongoing pandemic.

Li Wenliang Chinese physician who raised awareness about COVID-19 outbreak

Li Wenliang was a Chinese ophthalmologist known for raising awareness of early COVID-19 infections in Wuhan. On 30 December 2019, Wuhan CDC issued emergency warnings to local hospitals about a number of mysterious "pneumonia" cases discovered in the city in the previous week. On the same day, Li, who worked at Wuhan Central Hospital, received an internal diagnostic report of a suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patient from other doctors which he in turn shared with his friends. He was dubbed a whistleblower when that shared report later circulated publicly despite him requesting confidentiality from those with whom he shared the information. Rumours of a deadly SARS outbreak subsequently spread on Chinese social media platforms, and Wuhan police summoned and admonished him on 3 January for "making false comments on the Internet about unconfirmed SARS outbreak."

COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Thailand

The COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Thailand was the first country to report a case outside China, on 13 January 2020. As of 30 April 2021, the country has reported a cumulative total of 65,153 confirmed cases, with 203 deaths from the disease.

COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Taiwan

The COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. As of 30 June 2021, 2,321,383 tests had been conducted in Taiwan, of which 14,804 are confirmed cases, including 648 deaths.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Hubei was first manifested by a cluster of mysterious pneumonia in Wuhan, the provincial capital of Hubei, China. A Wuhan hospital notified the local center for disease control and prevention (CDC) and health commissions on December 27, 2019. On December 31, Wuhan CDC admitted that there was a cluster of unknown pneumonia cases related to Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market after the unverified documents appeared on the Internet. The potential disease outbreak soon drew nationwide attention including that of the National Health Commission (NHC) in Beijing which sent experts to Wuhan on the following day. On January 8, a new coronavirus was identified as the cause of the pneumonia. The sequence of the virus was soon published on an open-access database. Measures taken by China have been controversial. They were praised by the World Health Organization (WHO) for improvements over SARS-CoV-2 responses, but maligned by many in the international community for being slow to publicly disclose key facts or deceptive about the outbreak and for aggressively censoring information relating to the outbreak and public discontent from citizens online.

The Special Act for Prevention, Relief and Revitalization Measures for Severe Pneumonia with Novel Pathogens is a law of the Republic of China (Taiwan) regulating response and relief efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan.

World Health Organizations response to the COVID-19 pandemic Overview of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic by the World Health Organization

The World Health Organization is a leading organization involved in the global coordination for mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic, within the broader United Nations response to the pandemic caused by the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 in late 2019.

Ih-Jen Su is a Taiwanese medical researcher and distinguished investigator and was the director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan.

The Central Epidemic Command Center is an agency of the National Health Command Center (NHCC). It has been activated by the government of Taiwan for several disease outbreaks, such as the 2009 swine flu pandemic and the COVID-19 pandemic. The head of the agency is Chen Shih-chung, the minister of Health and Welfare. The CECC is associated with the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control.

Timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in 2019, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, Hubei, China, in December.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand began with the identification of the first case in the country on 13 January 2020, and has been ongoing since.

Investigations into the origin of COVID-19 Inquiries into the origins of SARS-CoV-2

There are several ongoing efforts by scientists, governments, international organisations, and others to determine the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Most scientists say that the virus is likely of zoonotic origin in a natural setting, from bats or another closely-related mammal. Several other explanations, including many conspiracy theories, have been proposed about the origins of the virus.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "CDC announces travel alert for Wuhan". The Taipei Times. 17 January 2020.
  2. "Honorary Superintendent". Chi Mei Medical Center. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Smith, Nicola (6 May 2020). "Taiwanese official reveals China suspected 'human to human' transmission by January 13". Telegraph Media Group Limited.
  4. 1 2 3 4 "Taiwan raises travel alert for Wuhan City over coronavirus outbreak". Central News Agency. 16 January 2020.
  5. Chiang, Yi-ching (28 February 2021). "INTERVIEW/Taiwan doctor recounts Wuhan experience in early days of COVID-19". Central News Agency. Retrieved 4 March 2021.