Chubu Electric Power

Last updated
Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc.
Native name
中部電力株式会社
Romanized name
Chūbu Denryoku kabushiki gaisha
Type Public ( Kabushiki gaisha )
Industry Energy
FoundedMay 1, 1951
Founder Douglas MacArthur, SCAP
Headquarters,
Area served
Aichi, Nagano and part of Gifu, Mie, Shizuoka Prefectures
Key people
Akihisa Mizuno (Chairman)
Satoru Katsuno (President)
Products Natural gas production, sale and distribution, electricity generation and distribution, hydroelectricity, wind power, energy trading
RevenueIncrease2.svg ¥2,603,537 million (FY, 2016, consolidated)
Increase2.svg¥121,483 million (FY, 2016, consolidated)
Increase2.svg¥114,665 million (FY, 2016, consolidated)
Total assets Increase2.svg¥5,412,307 million (FY, 2016, consolidated)
Total equity Increase2.svg¥1,724,713 million (FY, 2016, consolidated)
Number of employees
30,659 (March 2015, consolidated)
Website www.chuden.co.jp/english

Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. (中部電力株式会社, Chūbu Denryoku Kabushiki Kaisha ), abbreviated as Chuden in Japanese, is a Japanese electric utilities provider for the middle Chūbu region of the Honshu island of Japan. It provides electricity at 60 Hz, though an area of Nagano Prefecture uses 50 Hz. Chubu Electric Power ranks third among Japan's largest electric utilities in terms of power generation capacity, electric energy sold, and annual revenue. It is also one of Nagoya's "four influential companies" along with Meitetsu, Matsuzakaya, and Toho Gas. Recently, the company has also expanded into the business of optical fibers. On January 1, 2006, a new company, Chubu Telecommunications, was formed.

Contents

Recent news

In May 2011, Prime Minister Naoto Kan requested that the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant, which sits in an area considered overdue for a large earthquake, be shut down, after which Chubu Electric Power suspended operations at the plant. A lawsuit seeking the decommissioning of the reactors at the Hamaoka plant permanently has been filed. [1]

In August 2013, Chubu announced it would acquire an 80% stake in the Tokyo-based electricity supplier, Diamond Corp, marking the firm's entry into a market usually associated with Tokyo Electric Power Company. [2]

November 2019 it was announced Chubu had acquired a 20% stake (Mitsubishi the other 80%) in the Dutch energy company Eneco.

In April 2020, the logo mark was renewed. The renewed logo is named "The Beam."

Power Stations

The company has 194 separate generating stations with a total capacity of 32,473 MW.

Hydroelectric

Kamiosu Dam Kamiosu Dam.jpg
Kamiōsu Dam

The company has 182 separate hydro generating stations with a total capacity of 5,217 MW.

Thermal power stations

The company has 11 separate thermal power stations with a total capacity of 22,369 MW.

Nuclear power stations

On 6 May 2011, Prime Minister Naoto Kan requested the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant be shut down as an earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or higher is estimated 87% likely to hit the area within the next 30 years. [3] [4] [5] Kan wanted to avoid a possible repeat of the Fukushima I nuclear accidents. [6] On 9 May 2011, Chubu Electric decided to comply with the government request. In July 2011, a mayor in Shizuoka Prefecture and a group of residents filed a lawsuit seeking the decommissioning of the reactors at the Hamaoka nuclear power plant permanently. [7]

Other facilities

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Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant

The Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant is a nuclear power plant in the city of Omaezaki in Shizuoka Prefecture, on Japan's east coast, 200 km south-west of Tokyo. It is managed by the Chubu Electric Power Company. There are five units contained at a single site with a net area of 1.6 km2. A sixth unit began construction on December 22, 2008. On January 30, 2009, Hamaoka-1 and Hamaoka-2 were permanently shut down.

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Taketoyo Thermal Power Station

Taketoyo Thermal Power Station is a large thermal power station operated by JERA in the city of Taketoyo, Aichi. Japan. The facility is located at the northern end of Chita Peninsula.

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Nishi-Nagoya Thermal Power Station

Nishi-Nagoya Thermal Power Station is an LNG-fired thermal power station operated by JERA in the village of Tobishima, Aichi, Japan. The facility is located on reclaimed land at the head of Mikawa Bay.

Chita Daini Thermal Power Station

Chita Daini Thermal Power Station is an LNG-fired thermal power station operated by JERA in the city of Chita, Aichi, Japan. The facility is located on reclaimed land at the east side of Ise Bay. It is located about three kilometers northeast of the Chita Thermal Power Station.

Hekinan Thermal Power Station

Hekinan Thermal Power Station is a large thermal power station operated by JERA in the city of Hekinan, Aichi, Japan. The facility is located the head of the Chita Peninsula and is currently the largest coal-fired power station in Japan.

Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Station

Shin-Nagoya Thermal Power Station is a thermal power station operated by JERA in the Minato Ward of the city of Nagoya. Aichi Prefecture. Japan. The facility is located at the northern end of Chita Peninsula.

References

  1. "Suit seeks to shut Hamaoka reactors for good". The Japan Times . July 1, 2011. Archived from the original on October 26, 2011.
  2. Kentaro Hamada (6 August 2013). "Chubu Electric to buy Tokyo power supplier, moves into Tepco's turf". Reuters.
  3. Story at BBC News, 2011-05-06. retrieved 2011-05-08
  4. Story at Digital Journal. retrieved 2011-05-07
  5. Story at Bloomberg, 2011-05-07. retrieved 2011-05-08
  6. "Japan nuke plant suspends work". Herald Sun. May 15, 2011.
  7. "Suit seeks to shut Hamaoka reactors for good". The Japan Times . July 1, 2011. Archived from the original on October 26, 2011.