Chunghwa County

Last updated
Chunghwa County

중화군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja中和郡
  McCune-ReischauerChunghwa-gun
  Revised RomanizationJunghwa-gun
Coordinates: 38°51′33.01″N125°49′44.00″E / 38.8591694°N 125.8288889°E / 38.8591694; 125.8288889 Coordinates: 38°51′33.01″N125°49′44.00″E / 38.8591694°N 125.8288889°E / 38.8591694; 125.8288889
Country North Korea
Province North Hwanghae Province
Administrative divisions 1 up, 16 ri
Population
 (2008)
  Total77,367 [1]

Chunghwa County is a county of North Hwanghae, formerly one of the four suburban counties of East Pyongyang, North Korea. It sits north of Hwangju-gun, North Hwanghae, east of Kangnam-gun, North Hwanghae, west of Sangwŏn-gun, North Hwanghae, and south of Ryŏkp'o-guyŏk (Ryokpo District), Pyongyang. It became part of Pyongyang in May 1963, when it separated from South P'yŏngan Province. Chunghwa-gun is the location of a few historic sights (both Revolutionary and pre-Japanese occupation), such as the Chunghwa Hyanggyo, as well as a few KPA weapons units.[ citation needed ] In 2010, it was administratively reassigned from Pyongyang to North Hwanghae; foreign media attributed the change as an attempt to relieve shortages in Pyongyang's food distribution system. [2]

Administrative divisions

The county is divided into one town (ŭp), and 16 'ri' (villages). [3]

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References

  1. DPR Korean Central Bureau of Statistics: 2008 Population Census Archived May 14, 2011, at the Wayback Machine (Population 2008, published in 2009)
  2. "Pyongyang now more than one-third smaller; food shortage issues suspected", Asahi Shimbun , 2010-07-17, retrieved 2010-07-19
  3. "중앙일보 - 아시아 첫 인터넷 신문".