Church of St Nicholas, Burnage

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Coordinates: 53°25′11″N2°12′52″W / 53.4198°N 2.2145°W / 53.4198; -2.2145

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Church of St Nicholas

St Nicholas, Burnage - geograph.org.uk - 1584661.jpg

St Nicholas's
Denomination Church of England
Website www.st-nicholas-church.org.uk
History
Dedication St Nicholas
Administration
Parish Burnage
Diocese Anglican Diocese of Manchester
Province York
Clergy
Priest(s) Rachel Mann

The Church of St Nicholas, Kingsway, Burnage, Manchester, is a Modernist church of 1930–2 by N. F. Cachemaille-Day, Lander and Welch. [1] It was enlarged in 1964 with a bay on the west side, also by Cachemaille-Day. Pevsner describes the church as "a milestone in the history of church architecture in England". [1] The church was designated a Grade II* listed building on 10 October 1980. [2]

Burnage suburb of the city of Manchester in North West England

Burnage is a suburb of the city of Manchester in North West England, about 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Manchester city centre and bisected by the dual carriageway of Kingsway. The population of the Burnage Ward at the 2011 census was 15,227. It lies between Withington to the west, Levenshulme to the north, Heaton Chapel to the east and Didsbury and Heaton Mersey to the south.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Pevsner or Pevzner is a Jewish surname, and may refer to:

St Nicholas is one of a relatively small group of Modernist churches in England, and one of the earliest. It is "of brick, high, sheer and sculptural, with a German-inspired passion for brick grooves and ribbing, both vertical and horizontal." [1] The building cost £11,600. [3] The interior was plainly furnished, "the walls bare, the windows clear, but the ceiling is coffered in blue, red and gold". [1]

In 2001-3, the church underwent significant conservation, at a cost of over 1 million pounds. The conservation included a re-ordering of the interior to provide additional meeting space, and offices, including the insertion of a "striking glass circular meeting room", designed by Anthony Grimshaw Associates from Wigan. [4] "The church's spatial complexity is not spoiled, but rather added to", by "hanging the meeting room above head height". [1]

List of incumbents

A rector is, in an ecclesiastical sense, a cleric who functions as an administrative leader in some Christian denominations. In contrast, a vicar is also a cleric but functions as an assistant and representative of an administrative leader. The term comes from the Latin for the helmsman of a ship.

Rachel Mann British Anglican priest, poet and LGBT activist

Rachel Mann is a British Anglican priest, poet and feminist theologian. She is a trans woman who writes, speaks and broadcasts on a wide range of topics including gender, sexuality and religion.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Hartwell et al. 2004, p. 410
  2. http://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-388253-church-of-st-nicholas-manchester
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2011.
  4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2011.

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