Church of St Peter, Blackley

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Church of St Peter, Blackley, Manchester Church of St Peter Blackley 7.jpg
Church of St Peter, Blackley, Manchester

The Church of St Peter in Old Market Street, Blackley, Manchester, England, is a Gothic Revival church of 1844 by E. H. Shellard. [1] It was a Commissioners' church erected at a cost of £3162. [1] The church is particularly notable for an almost completely intact interior. [1] It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 20 June 1988. [2]

Blackley area of the city of Manchester, England

Blackley is a suburban area of Manchester, England. Historically in Lancashire, it is 4.5 miles (7.2 km) north of Manchester city centre, on the River Irk.

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Commissioners church type of Anglican church

A Commissioners' church, also known as a Waterloo church and Million Act church, is an Anglican church in the United Kingdom built with money voted by Parliament as a result of the Church Building Acts of 1818 and 1824. The 1818 Act supplied a grant of money and established the Church Building Commission to direct its use, and in 1824 made a further grant of money. In addition to paying for the building of churches, the Commission had powers to divide and subdivide parishes, and to provide endowments. The Commission continued to function as a separate body until the end of 1856, when it was absorbed into the Ecclesiastical Commission. In some cases the Commissioners provided the full cost of the new church; in other cases they provided a partial grant and the balance was raised locally. In total 612 new churches were provided, mainly in expanding industrial towns and cities.

Contents

The church is of "coursed sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings". [2] The nave has buttresses and "clumsy" pinnacles and ends in a "blunt" west tower. [1] The interior is aisled and "particularly impressive for its complete (nineteenth century) interior with the extremely unusual survival of all the fine boxes and other pews". [2]

The churchyard contains the war graves of ten service personnel of World War I and seven of World War II. [3]

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) is an intergovernmental organisation of six independent member states whose principal function is to mark, record and maintain the graves and places of commemoration of Commonwealth of Nations military service members who died in the two World Wars. The Commission is also responsible for commemorating Commonwealth civilians who died as a result of enemy action during World War II. The Commission was founded by Sir Fabian Ware and constituted through Royal Charter in 1917 named the Imperial War Graves Commission. The change to the present name took place in 1960.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M9 postcode area is to the north of the city centre and includes the districts of Blackley and Harpurhey. This postcode area contains 15 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is residential, and the listed buildings include houses, churches, a pillar box, a statue, a former public baths and laundry, a war memorial, and a crematorium.

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Church of St Cross, Clayton church in Manchester, UK

The Church of St Cross, Clayton, Manchester, is a Victorian church by William Butterfield, built in 1863–66. It was designated a grade II* listed building in 1963.

Church of St James, Didsbury Church

St James, Didsbury, on Stenner Lane, is a Grade II* Church of England church in the Manchester suburb of Didsbury and with Emmanuel church is part of the parish of St James and Emmanuel, Didsbury.

Grade I listed churches in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England. It was created by the Local Government Act 1972, and consists of the metropolitan boroughs of Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan and the cities of Manchester and Salford. This is a complete list of the Grade I listed churches in the metropolitan county as recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Buildings are listed by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on the recommendation of English Heritage. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade.

Chadderton is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England and it is unparished. It contains 19 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area was rural until the coming of the Industrial Revolution, silk weaving arrived in the 18th century, and in the 19th and 20th centuries large cotton mills were built. The Rochdale Canal runs through the town, and two structures associated with it are listed, a bridge and a lock. The oldest listed buildings are farmhouses and a country house. The later buildings reflect the growing wealth of the town, and include cotton mills, churches, civic buildings, and a war memorial.

Royton is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England and it is unparished. It contains five listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area was rural until the coming of the Industrial Revolution when the town grew due to the cotton industry. Th listed buildings consist of a house, a farm building, two churches and a cotton mill.

Swinton and Pendlebury is a town in the City of Salford Metropolitan Borough, Greater Manchester, England. It contains 23 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The listed buildings include houses, churches and items in churchyards, a public house, aqueducts, a railway viaduct, cemetery buildings, a bandstand and war memorials.

Lees is a village in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England and it is unparished. It contains seven listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The listed buildings consist of two churches, a public house, a mill, two houses, and a war memorial.

Audenshaw is a town in Tameside, Greater Manchester, England. The town contains eight listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. All the listed buildings are designated at Grade II, the lowest of the three grades, which is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The listed buildings consist of houses, a farm building, a milestone, a church, a drinking trough, a former transformer pillar, and a war memorial

Denton is a town in Tameside, Greater Manchester, England. The town and the township of Haughton contain 18 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, three are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Stretford is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. The town contains 20 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. All the listed buildings are designated at Grade II, the lowest of the three grades, which is applied to "buildings of national importance and special interest". The town is adjacent to the centre of Manchester, and is partly residential and partly industrial. The Bridgewater Canal and the Manchester Ship Canal run through the town, and there are listed buildings associated with both canals. The other listed buildings include two medieval structures, churches, the entrances to a former botanical garden and to a park, a factory, civic buildings, a former cinema, a hotel, and three war memorials.

Urmston is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. The town, together with areas of Flixton and Davyhulme, contains 19 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, one is at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. Until the arrival of the railway in 1872–73, Urmston was a village surrounded by a rural area, and it has since become largely residential and a commuter town. The listed buildings include churches with items in the churchyard, houses and associated structures, and four war memorials.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M13 postcode area is to the south of the centre of the city and includes parts of the districts of Chorlton-on-Medlock and Longsight. The postcode area contains 38 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, seven are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area includes the main buildings of the University of Manchester, some of which are listed, as are some hospitals. The area is otherwise mainly residential, and the other listed buildings include houses, some of which have been converted for other uses, churches and chapels, public houses, former public baths, a museum, a milepost, railings, a statue, and a war memorial.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M16 postcode area is to the south of the city centre, and contains the area of Whalley Range. The postcode area contains 12 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M18 postcode area is to the southeast of the city centre, and contains the area of Gorton. The postcode area contains 14 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, three are listed at Grade II*, the middle grade of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is now mainly residential, and the listed buildings include houses, churches, a mausoleum, a public house, a war memorial, and a former school.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M19 postcode area is to the south of the city centre, and contains the areas of Burnage, and Levenshulme. The postcode area contains five listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The areas are mainly residential, and all the five listed buildings are churches.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M22 postcode area of the city includes parts of the suburbs of Northenden and Wythenshawe. This postcode area contains 15 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, three are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is largely residential and most of the listed buildings are houses and churches and associated structures. The other listed buildings include a bridge, a war memorial, and a former bus depot.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M23 postcode area of the city includes parts of the suburbs of Wythenshawe and Northenden. The postcode area contains eleven listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest of the three grades, two are at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is almost completely residential, and the listed buildings include two former manor houses and associated structures, a former farm and outbuildings, a house, a church, and a vicarage.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M40 postcode area is to the northeast of the city centre, and includes parts of the districts of Miles Platting, Clayton, and Moston. This postcode area contains 13 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is partly industrial and partly residential. Until the Industrial Revolution, it was rural and one listed building, Hough Hall, has survived from this time. The industrial buildings are textile mills, some of which have been converted for other uses. The area includes Phillips Park Cemetery, and four structures associated with it are included in the list. The other listed buildings are churches and associated structures.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M8 postcode area is to the north of the city centre, and contains the districts of Cheetham Hill and Crumpsall. This postcode area contains 20 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, two are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade. The area is residential, and the listed buildings include churches and associated structures, houses, former civic buildings, two museums, a bandstand, a park shelter, a former billiard hall, and a war memorial.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner 2004, pp. 385-386.
  2. 1 2 3 Stuff, Good. "Church of St Peter, Crumpsall, Manchester". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk.
  3. CWGC Cemetery Report.

Bibliography

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Coordinates: 53°31′24″N2°13′05″W / 53.5234°N 2.2180°W / 53.5234; -2.2180

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.