Church of St Peter, Blackley

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Church of St Peter, Blackley
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Church of St Peter
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Church of St Peter, Blackley
Location in Manchester
53°31′25″N2°13′05″W / 53.5235°N 2.218°W / 53.5235; -2.218 Coordinates: 53°31′25″N2°13′05″W / 53.5235°N 2.218°W / 53.5235; -2.218
Location Blackley, Greater Manchester
CountryEngland
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Central
History
Status Parish church
Dedication St Peter
Dedicated1844
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Heritage designationGrade II*
Architectural typeParish church
Style Gothic Revival architecture

The Church of St Peter in Old Market Street, Blackley, Manchester, England, is a Gothic Revival church of 1844 by E. H. Shellard. [1] It was a Commissioners' church erected at a cost of £3162. [1] The church is particularly notable for an almost completely intact interior. [1] It was designated a Grade II* listed building on 20 June 1988. [2]

Contents

The church is of "coursed sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings". [2] The nave has buttresses and "clumsy" pinnacles and ends in a "blunt" west tower. [1] The interior is aisled and "particularly impressive for its complete (nineteenth century) interior with the extremely unusual survival of all the fine boxes and other pews". [2]

The churchyard contains the war graves of ten service personnel of World War I and seven of World War II. [3]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner 2004, pp. 385-386.
  2. 1 2 3 Stuff, Good. "Church of St Peter, Crumpsall, Manchester". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk.
  3. CWGC Cemetery Report.

Bibliography