Church of St Wilfrid, Northenden

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Church of St Wilfred, Northenden
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Church of St Wilfred
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Church of St Wilfred, Northenden
Location in Manchester
53°24′26″N2°15′13″W / 53.4071°N 2.2535°W / 53.4071; -2.2535 Coordinates: 53°24′26″N2°15′13″W / 53.4071°N 2.2535°W / 53.4071; -2.2535
Location Northenden, Greater Manchester
CountryEngland
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Central
History
Status Parish church
Dedication St Wilfred
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Heritage designationGrade II*
Architectural typeParish church

The Church of St Wilfrid in Ford Lane, Northenden, Manchester, England, is an Anglican church of late medieval origins which was substantially re-built in the 19th century by J. S. Crowther. [1] The church was designated a Grade II* listed building on 25 February 1952. [2]

Contents

The origin of St Wilfrid's is possibly Saxon, with a mention in the Domesday Book of a "church (at) Norwardine: (held by) Ranulf and Bigot from Earl Hugh." [3] The core of the current church is 15th century. [2] Crowther was commissioned to undertake repairs in 1872 but found that the medieval church was substantially without foundations. He therefore undertook complete rebuilding, except for the Perpendicular tower, in 1873–6. [1] Crowther also prepared plans for the re-building of the tower, but these were not followed through and reconstruction was undertaken instead. [2]

The interior contains some original medieval screens, including one above the doorway in the south chapel which depicts "a pair of tumblers and a monkey sitting on a drum. The tumblers can be read in two ways, so that they really do seem to tumble." [1] The Victorian stained glass is complete, donated either by the Tatton family of nearby Wythenshawe Hall, or the Watkins family of Rose Hill, Northenden [1] Some may be the work of the significant stained glass designer, Charles Eamer Kempe. [4] There is a good selection of funerary monuments "to members of the Tatton and Egerton families including: Robert Tatton (d.1689), aedicule with putti; Mrs Egerton (d.1784), urn with carved flower garland; William Egerton (d.1806), woman lying on sarcophagus; and to Thomas Worthington (d.1856), mourning woman with 3 sarcophagi under weeping willow." [2]

In the large graveyard is the tomb of Sir Edward Watkin, Victorian railway magnate, as well as those of many of the Tatton family. [4] The churchyard also contains war graves of eight service personnel of World War I and three from World War II. [5]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell et al. 2004, p 462-4
  2. 1 2 3 4 Stuff, Good. "Church of St Wilfrid, Northenden, Manchester". britishlistedbuildings.co.uk.
  3. "The Domesday Book Online - Lancashire M-Z". www.domesdaybook.co.uk.
  4. 1 2 "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-03-15. Retrieved 2011-04-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. CWGC Cemetery Report. Breakdown obtained from casualty record.

Sources