City Police Courts, Manchester

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City Police Courts, Manchester

Manchester Police Courts 2.jpg

Minshull Street Crown Court
Type Law Courts
Location Manchester, England
Coordinates 53°28′43″N2°14′06″W / 53.4786°N 2.2349°W / 53.4786; -2.2349 Coordinates: 53°28′43″N2°14′06″W / 53.4786°N 2.2349°W / 53.4786; -2.2349
Area city centre
Built 1868-71
Architect Thomas Worthington
Architectural style(s) Flemish Gothic
Governing body Ministry of Justice (United Kingdom)
Listed Building – Grade II*
Official name: City Police Courts, Manchester
Designated 3 October 1974
Reference no. 388318
Greater Manchester UK relief location map.jpg
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Location of City Police Courts, Manchester in Greater Manchester

The City Police Courts, now commonly called Minshull Street Crown Court, is a complex of court buildings on Minshull Street in Manchester, designed in 1867–73 by the architect Thomas Worthington. [1] The court was designated a Grade II* listed building on 3 October 1974. [2]

Manchester City and metropolitan borough in England

Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017. It lies within the United Kingdom's second-most populous built-up area, with a population of 3.2 million. It is fringed by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and an arc of towns with which it forms a continuous conurbation. The local authority is Manchester City Council.

Thomas Worthington (architect) English architect

Thomas Worthington was a 19th-century English architect, particularly associated with public buildings in and around Manchester. Worthington's preferred style was the Gothic Revival.

Contents

Police Courts showing the 1990s extension Police Courts Manchester 7.JPG
Police Courts showing the 1990s extension

The style is Worthington's trademark flamboyant Flemish Gothic with a massive corner tower and a chimney stack styled as a campanile. The courts are constructed in red brick with sandstone dressings and steeply-pitched slate roofs. There is a profusion of animal carving by Earp and Hobbs. [3] Worthington drew both on his rejected designs for the Town Hall, and on his earlier plans for Ellen Wilkinson High School, although the central tower he used there is placed asymmetrically at the Police Courts, due to the constraints of the site. [1] The interior court rooms "have been preserved with relatively few alterations." [1]

Thomas Earp (sculptor) British sculptor

Thomas Earp (1828–1893) was a British sculptor and architectural carver who was active in the late 19th century. His best known work is his 1863 reproduction of the Eleanor Cross which stands at Charing Cross in London. He specialised in sculpture for Gothic Revival churches and worked closely with the architect George Edmund Street in the 1860s and 1870s.

Ellen Wilkinson High School

Ellen Wilkinson High School was housed, until it closed in 2000, in a Grade II* listed building in Ardwick, Manchester, England, designed in 1879–80 by the prolific Manchester architect Thomas Worthington. Formerly known as Nicholls Hospital, the building was funded by Benjamin Nicholls as a memorial to his son, John Ashton Nicholls. Nicholls commissioned Worthington to prepare designs in 1867, with instructions that building was only to commence after his own death. It was Worthington's last significant commission in the city. The original usage was as an orphanage; the Ashton family gave over £100,000 to its construction and endowment.

In 1993-96, the buildings were extensively modernised. The original courtyard was glazed over and an extension was added to the Aytoun Street side of the courts. The architect for these works was James Stevenson of the Hurd Rolland Partnership. [1]

See also

Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester Wikimedia list article

There are 236 Grade II* listed buildings in Greater Manchester, England. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade II* structures are those considered to be "particularly significant buildings of more than local interest". In England, the authority for listing under the Planning Act 1990 rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Manchester is a city in Northwest England. The M1 postcode area of the city includes part of the city centre, in particular the Northern Quarter, the area known as Chinatown, and part of the district of Chorlton-on-Medlock. The postcode area contains 192 listed buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England. Of these, 14 are listed at Grade II*, the middle of the three grades, and the others are at Grade II, the lowest grade.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Hartwell 2001, p. 172-3.
  2. "City Police Courts - Manchester - Manchester - England". British Listed Buildings. 1974-10-03. Retrieved 2016-12-27.
  3. Hartwell/Hyde/Pevsner 2004, p. ???.

Sources

Nikolaus Pevsner German-born British scholar

Sir Nikolaus Bernhard Leon Pevsner was a German, later British scholar of the history of art, especially of architecture.

Yale University Press university press associated with Yale University

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University. It was founded in 1908 by George Parmly Day, and became an official department of Yale University in 1961, but it remains financially and operationally autonomous.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

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