City Tower, Manchester

Last updated
City Tower
Sunley Tower, Manchester.jpg
General information
StatusComplete
Type Office, Communication, Retail
Architectural style Modernist
Location Manchester, England
Coordinates 53°28′49″N2°14′18″W / 53.48028°N 2.23833°W / 53.48028; -2.23833 Coordinates: 53°28′49″N2°14′18″W / 53.48028°N 2.23833°W / 53.48028; -2.23833
Completed1965
Owner Schroders
Height
Antenna spire123 m (404 ft)
Roof107 m (351 ft)
Top floor28
Technical details
Floor count30
Floor area20,905 m2 (225,020 sq ft)
Lifts/elevators8
Design and construction
Architect Covell, Matthews & Partners
Developer Bernard Sunley & Sons

City Tower (formerly Sunley House) is a 30-storey skyscraper situated in the Piccadilly Gardens area of Manchester, England. It is one of the highest office spaces currently available in Manchester, standing 107 metres (351 ft) tall. City Tower was completed in 1965, one of three buildings forming the Piccadilly Plaza complex which was constructed by the developers Bernard Sunley & Sons and designed by Covell, Matthews & Partners, 1959-65. [1] It is currently the fourth tallest building in Manchester. The Tower has retail and leisure units on the ground floor and is Manchester's main radio transmitting station, which is located on the roof. The developer Bruntwood sold City Tower to the asset management company Schroders for £132 million in 2014 but kept their headquarters in the building. [2]

Skyscraper tall building

A skyscraper is a continuously habitable high-rise building that has over 40 floors and is taller than approximately 150 m (492 ft). Historically, the term first referred to buildings with 10 to 20 floors in the 1880s. The definition shifted with advancing construction technology during the 20th century. Skyscrapers may host commercial offices or residential space, or both. For buildings above a height of 300 m (984 ft), the term "supertall" can be used, while skyscrapers reaching beyond 600 m (1,969 ft) are classified as "megatall".

Piccadilly Gardens

Piccadilly Gardens is a green space in Manchester city centre, England, between Market Street and the edge of the Northern Quarter. Piccadilly runs eastwards from the junction of Market Street with Mosley Street to the junction of London Road with Ducie Street; to the south are the gardens and paved areas. The area was reconfigured in 2002 with a water feature and concrete pavilion by Japanese architect Tadao Ando.

Manchester city centre central business district of the City of Manchester, England

Manchester city centre is the central business district of Manchester, England, within the boundaries of Trinity Way, Great Ancoats Street and Whitworth Street. The City Centre ward had a population of 17,861 at the 2011 census.

Contents

The Piccadilly Plaza was remodelled by Leslie Jones Architects in 2001-02. City Tower stands at right angles to Piccadilly and the north-facing wall is covered with designs based on circuit boards. In the remodelling the building to the west of City Tower, Eagle Star House, was replaced by a building whose roofs are a pale echo of the swooping roofs of the original. [3]

Background

View of part of the Piccadilly Plaza, including City Tower Manchester Portland Street New York Street 1107.JPG
View of part of the Piccadilly Plaza, including City Tower

The Tower has entrances on York Street (renamed New York Street in 2008) and Piccadilly Gardens (formerly Parker Street). Over the years, the Tower became increasingly run down and many tenants left.[ citation needed ] A refurbishment programme was drawn up in the late 1990s, but this was never realised until Bruntwood purchased Piccadilly Plaza for £65 million in 2004. This plan is complete, with a new central ground floor entrance. The next phase involved repainting and fitting an atrium to the sides of the Tower. An advertising screen has been erected showing full motion video clips to passers-by in the Gardens.

A full motion video (FMV) is a video game narration technique that relies upon pre-recorded video files to display action in the game. While many games feature FMVs as a way to present information during cutscenes, games that are primarily presented through FMVs are referred to as full-motion video games or interactive movies.

The Tower is one of Manchester's main broadcast transmission sites, hosting the antennae of local radio stations Radio X, XS Manchester and Capital on FM and digital radio multiplexes Digital One, BBC, MXR North West and CE Manchester.

Radio X (United Kingdom)

Radio X is a United Kingdom commercial radio station brand focused on alternative music, primarily indie rock, and owned by Global. Radio X launched nationally on 21 September 2015 as a rebrand of Xfm and superseded Xfm London and Xfm Manchester.

XS Manchester

XS Manchester is an Independent Local Radio station serving Greater Manchester, broadcasting a mix of peak-time news, rock music and talk output. The station is owned and operated by Communicorp and broadcasts from studios at studios at Spinningfields in Manchester.

Capital Manchester radio station

Capital Manchester is a local radio station owned and operated by the Global Radio as part of the Capital radio network. The station broadcasts from their studios at Global's Manchester HQ in the XYZ Building in Spinningfields, Manchester.

The penthouse on floor 28 differs from the other floors as it originally had a walkway around the perimeter. When Bruntwood acquired City Tower, they removed the walkway and installed wider windows. The redesign included an overhang with floor to ceiling windows.

Although City Tower is not the tallest building in the city, the 28th floor is the highest commercial office space in Manchester. This floor was occupied by UKFast [4] but now appears to be at least partly vacant.

UKFast

UKFast.Net Ltd is a business-to-business hosting company based in Manchester, UK. It is principally known for managed hosting, cloud services, and colocation. The business also owns a data centre complex in Trafford Park, Manchester.

See also

Architecture of Manchester

The architecture of Manchester demonstrates a rich variety of architectural styles. The city is a product of the Industrial Revolution and is known as the first modern, industrial city. Manchester is noted for its warehouses, railway viaducts, cotton mills and canals - remnants of its past when the city produced and traded goods. Manchester has minimal Georgian or medieval architecture to speak of and consequently has a vast array of 19th and early 20th-century architecture styles; examples include Palazzo, Neo-Gothic, Venetian Gothic, Edwardian baroque, Art Nouveau, Art Deco and the Neo-Classical.

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References

  1. Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004), Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, (The Buildings of England), Yale University Press, ISBN   0-300-10583-5; p. 326
  2. "City Tower sale announcement". 7 May 2014. Retrieved 24 September 2014.
  3. Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004), Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, (The Buildings of England), Yale University Press, ISBN   0-300-10583-5; p. 326
  4. "BBC". BBC Highest office space in Manchester.