Claude Humphrey

Last updated

Claude Humphrey
No. 87
Position: Defensive end
Personal information
Born: (1944-06-29) June 29, 1944 (age 77)
Memphis, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:252 lb (114 kg)
Career information
High school: Memphis (TN) Lester
College: Tennessee State
NFL Draft: 1968  / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games:171
Safeties:2
Player stats at NFL.com

Claude B. Humphrey (born June 29, 1944) is a former American football defensive end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. Humphrey was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

Contents

Professional career

Humphrey was drafted out of Tennessee State University in the first round of the 1968 NFL Draft with the third overall choice by the Falcons. Humphrey was an All-American in 1967.

Humphrey's stellar career included being named First-team All-Pro five times (1971–74, and 1977), Second- Team All-Pro three times (1969, 1970, 1976), and All-NFC six times (1970–74, 1977). He was second-team All-NFC in 1976 when Humphrey unofficially recorded a career-high 15 quarterback sacks. In addition, Humphrey was named to the Pro Bowl six times over the span of his career (1970–74 & 1977).

Humphrey finished out his career with the Philadelphia Eagles from 1979–81. In 1980 Humphrey was a designated pass rusher, recording a team-high 14½ sacks helping the Eagles become NFC champions and earn a spot in Super Bowl XV. He finished his career with an unofficial 126½ career sacks with the Falcons and Eagles. He retired in 1981, the season before sacks were recorded as an official NFL statistic.[ citation needed ]

During Super Bowl XV, Humphrey was called for roughing the passer against Oakland Raiders quarterback Jim Plunkett. Humphrey picked up the penalty flag and fired it back at referee Ben Dreith.

Humphrey is a member of the Georgia Hall of Fame and the Tennessee Hall of Fame. His alma mater (Tennessee State University) retired his number and inducted him into their Hall of Fame. His high school has also retired his jersey and he is a member of his high school Hall of Fame, and is a member of the Atlanta Falcons Ring of Honor.

Humphrey is a member of Phi Beta Sigma.

Outside Football

Claude Humphrey also had a guest appearance on The Dukes of Hazzard episode "Repo Men" in which he portrayed Big John, a counterfeiter. [1]

Pro Football Hall of Fame

Humphrey was a final 15 candidate in 2003, 2005, and 2006. On August 27, 2008, he was named as one of two senior candidates for the 2009 Hall of Fame election. [2] In August 2013, he was named as one of two senior candidates for the 2014 Hall of Fame election.

In February 2014, Claude Humphrey was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the senior ballot. During his time in football, Humphrey was a revolutionary pass-rushing defensive lineman who paved the way for Reggie White, Bruce Smith, and fellow 2014 NFL HOF inductee Michael Strahan.[ citation needed ]

On August 2, 2014, Humphrey was officially inducted at the Enshrinement Ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.

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References

  1. "Q&A with Hall-of-Fame DE Claude Humphrey". atlantafalcons.com.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 3, 2008. Retrieved September 3, 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)