Claxheugh

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Claxheugh
Claxheugh.jpg
Claxheugh Rock
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Claxheugh
Location in Tyne and Wear
Coordinates: 54°54′36″N1°26′10″W / 54.910°N 1.436°W / 54.910; -1.436 Coordinates: 54°54′36″N1°26′10″W / 54.910°N 1.436°W / 54.910; -1.436
OS grid reference NZ362574
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Country England
District Tyne and Wear

Claxheugh ( /ˈklæəf/ KLATCH-əf) is an area of South Hylton, Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. The area is primarily known for the large, limestone and sandstone cliff formed in the late Permian period, known as Claxheugh Rock, which forms part of the Ford Formation. The rock is often referred to as 'klachy rock' by the locals. Claxheugh Rock is known as the rock of the wear by some and is home to many birds and wild animals, since 2003 the population of rabbit has decreased by over 60% by poachers and hunters.

South Hylton human settlement in United Kingdom

South Hylton is a suburb of Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. Lying west of Sunderland city centre on the south bank of the River Wear, South Hylton has a population of 10,317. Once a small industrial village, South Hylton is now a dormitory village and is a single track terminus for the Tyne and Wear Metro.

City of Sunderland City and metropolitan borough in England

The City of Sunderland is a local government district of Tyne and Wear, in North East England, with the status of a city and metropolitan borough. It is named after its largest settlement, Sunderland, but covers a far larger area which includes the towns of Hetton-le-Hole, Houghton-le-Spring, and Washington, as well as a range of suburban villages.

Tyne and Wear County of England

Tyne and Wear ( ) is a metropolitan county in the North East region of England around the mouths of the rivers Tyne and Wear. It came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. It consists of the five metropolitan boroughs of South Tyneside, North Tyneside, City of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead and City of Sunderland. It is bounded on the east by the North Sea, and has borders with Northumberland to the north and County Durham to the south.


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