Clem Daniels

Last updated

Clem Daniels
No. 36, 33, 34
Position: Halfback
Personal information
Born:(1937-07-09)July 9, 1937
McKinney, Texas
Died:March 23, 2019(2019-03-23) (aged 81)
Oakland, California
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
College: Prairie View A&M
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career professional statistics
Rushing yards:5,138
Yards per carry:4.5
Rushing touchdowns:30
Receptions:203
Receiving yards:3,314
Receiving touchdowns:24
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Clemon C. Daniels Jr. [1] (October 3, 1937 – March 23, 2019) was an American professional football player who was a halfback in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). [2]

Contents

College career

At Prairie View A&M University, he was voted to All-Conference honors during his sophomore and junior years, and captained the NAIA National Football Championship team in his senior year. [3]

He also completed the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Program at Prairie View A&M, later being a commissioned officer in the United States Army Reserve.

Professional career

Daniels was signed as a free agent in 1960 by the AFL's Dallas Texans, [4] [5] who, like other AFL teams recruited players from small and predominantly black colleges, which were mainly ignored by the conservative NFL. He was on the Texans' roster for 14 games in 1960, but saw little playing time behind Abner Haynes. In 1961, he was traded to the AFL's Oakland Raiders, and spent seven years there. He was an American Football League All-Star in 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966. [6]

In 1963, Daniels was The Sporting News American Football League Player of the Year, with a 5.1 yards/carry average, gaining 1,099 yards. [7] He was the All-Time leading rusher in the American Football League and was selected to the All-Time All-AFL Team. [8]

Honors

He was voted into Prairie View's Hall of Fame in 1992 and the California Black Athletic Hall of Fame in 1993. He was inducted into the Texas Football Hall of Fame in 1999. [9]

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References

  1. "Clem Daniels". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  2. "Clem Daniels". databasefootball.com. Archived from the original on September 12, 2009. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  3. "Clem Daniels". summitbankfoundation.com. Archived from the original on March 30, 2007. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  4. "Clem Danials". raidersonline.org. Archived from the original on July 24, 2008. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  5. "Prairie View A&M University's National Alumni Association Elects New President". black-collegian.com. 2006. Archived from the original on October 29, 2007. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  6. "Clem Daniels". summitbankfoundation.com. Archived from the original on March 30, 2007. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  7. "Clem Daniels". raidersonline.org. Archived from the original on July 24, 2008. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  8. "American Football League ALL – TIME TEAM". remembertheafl.com. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
  9. "Clem Daniels". theraidercast.com. Archived from the original on November 21, 2008. Retrieved October 21, 2008.
Preceded by
Len Dawson & Cookie Gilchrist
American Football League MVP
1963
with Lance Alworth
Tobin Rote
Succeeded by
Gino Cappelletti