Clement Comer Clay

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Clement Comer Clay
Clement Comer Clay.jpg
United States Senator
from Alabama
In office
June 19, 1837 November 15, 1841

In 1835 Clay was elected Governor. Clay's term as governor ended early when he was appointed by the state legislature to the United States Senate in 1837 (this was before popular election of senators).

Spring Hill College

In 1836, Governor Clay signed a legislative act which chartered Spring Hill College in Mobile, Alabama, the third oldest Jesuit college in the United States. The charter gave it "full power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and sciences, or in any art or science as are usually granted or conferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." The college resulted from the strong French Catholic traditions in the city, founded as a French colony.

Creek War of 1836

Clay's term in office was dominated by the Creek War of 1836 arising from resistance to Indian Removal, which had taken place in the Southeast since 1830. During Clay's administration, the United States Army removed the Creek Indians from Southeastern Alabama under the terms of the 1832 Treaty of Cusseta. The Creek were relocated to the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) west of the Mississippi. Confrontations between Indians and white settlers occurred. [5]

Panic of 1837

During the Panic of 1837, the United States suffered a financial crisis brought on by speculative fever. This crisis caused a run on the Bank of the State of Alabama. Clay ordered the bank to provide a detailed report of its finances, but it was unable to do so. [6]

United States Senate

After election by the state legislature, Clay served in the United States Senate from June 19, 1837, until his resignation on November 15, 1841.

In the year after the end of the Civil War, Clement died of natural causes in September 1866, aged 76. His wife Susanna had died earlier the same year.

Notes

  1. National Governors Association
  2. Nuermberger, Ruth Ketring (15 July 2014). The Clays of Alabama: A Planter-Lawyer-Politician Family. ISBN   9780813164090.
  3. Alabama Marriage Collection, 1800-1969 Record
  4. The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress, pp. 89-92
  5. "Clement Comer Clay". Alabama Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 2012-06-23.
  6. "Clement Comer Clay". Alabama Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 2012-06-28.

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References

Party political offices
Preceded by Democratic nominee for Governor of Alabama
1835
Succeeded by
Legal offices
New title Chief Justice of the
Supreme Court of Alabama

1820–1823
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's 1st congressional district

March 4, 1829 – March 4, 1835
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Governor of Alabama
1835–1837
Succeeded by
U.S. Senate
Preceded by United States Senator
from Alabama
(Class 3)

1837–1841
with William R. King (1837–1841)
Succeeded by