Clementine Plessner

Last updated
Clementine Plessner
Born
Clementine Folkmann

7 December 1855
Died27 February 1943 (aged 88)
Years active1918-1932

Clementine Plessner (7 December 1855 – 27 February 1943) was an Austrian stage and film actress. Plessner worked in the German film industry and appeared in over sixty films, mostly during the silent era. Plessner featured in Richard Oswald's enlightenment film Different from the Others [1] and F.W. Murnau's Journey into the Night . [2]

Contents

Following the Nazi rise to power, the Jewish actress left Germany for neighbouring Austria. Later, after the Anchluss, she was arrested by the Nazi authorities and died in Theresienstadt concentration camp.

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Prawer p.77
  2. Eisner p.275

Bibliography