Coatepeque Caldera

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Coatepeque Caldera aka Coatepeque Lake (Lago De Coatepeque)
Teopan.jpg
Aerial view of Lago Coatepeque
Highest point
Elevation 746 m (2,448 ft)
Coordinates 13°52′N89°33′W / 13.87°N 89.55°W / 13.87; -89.55
Geography
Location El Salvador
Geology
Mountain type Caldera
Last eruption Unknown

Caldera De Coatepeque (Nahuatl cōātepēc, "at the snake hill") is a volcanic caldera in El Salvador in Central America. The caldera was formed during a series of minor rhyolitic explosive eruptions between about 72,000 and 57,000 years ago. Since then, basaltic cinder cones and lava flows formed near the west edge of the caldera, and six rhyodacitic lava domes have formed. The youngest dome, Cerro Pacho, formed after 8000 BC.

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Lago de Coatepeque
Coatepeque Caldera.jpg
Coordinates 13°52′N89°33′W / 13.87°N 89.55°W / 13.87; -89.55 Coordinates: 13°52′N89°33′W / 13.87°N 89.55°W / 13.87; -89.55
Type crater lake
Basin  countriesEl Salvador
Surface area26 km2 (10 sq mi)
Islands Teopan

Lake Coatepeque

Lake Coatepeque (Lago de Coatepeque) is a large crater lake in the east part of the Coatepeque Caldera. It is in Coatepeque municipality, Santa Ana, El Salvador. There are hot springs near the lake margins. At 26 square kilometres (10 sq mi), it is one of the largest lakes in El Salvador. In the lake is the island of Teopan, which was a Mayan site of some importance.

See also

Related Research Articles

A caldera is a large cauldron-like hollow that forms shortly after the emptying of a magma chamber/reservoir in a volcanic eruption. When large volumes of magma are erupted over a short time, structural support for the rock above the magma chamber is lost. The ground surface then collapses downward into the emptied or partially emptied magma chamber, leaving a massive depression at the surface. Although sometimes described as a crater, the feature is actually a type of sinkhole, as it is formed through subsidence and collapse rather than an explosion or impact. Only seven caldera-forming collapses are known to have occurred since 1900, most recently at Bárðarbunga volcano, Iceland in 2014.

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Medicine Lake Volcano mountain in United States of America

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Santa Ana Volcano Volcano in the Department of Santa Ana, El Salvador.

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Santa Ana Department Department of El Salvador

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Volcán Tolimán mountain in Guatemala

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Almolonga mountain in Guatemala

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Água de Pau Massif Stratovolcano in São Miguel Island

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Coatepeque is a municipality in the Santa Ana department of El Salvador.

Coatepeque may refer to:

Lake Ilopango Crater Lake of El Salvador

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Sollipulli mountain

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Lava Molten rock expelled by a volcano during an eruption

Lava is molten rock generated by geothermal energy and expelled through fractures in planetary crust or in an eruption, usually at temperatures from 700 to 1,200 °C. The structures resulting from subsequent solidification and cooling are also sometimes described as lava. The molten rock is formed in the interior of some planets, including Earth, and some of their satellites, though such material located below the crust is referred to by other terms.

Mount Hakone volcano in Honshu, Japan

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Incapillo

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Potrerillos is a caldera in Chile, in the Atacama Region.

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