Cochise County, Arizona

Last updated
Cochise County
County
County of Cochise
Cochise County courthouse, Bisbee, Arizona.jpg
The art deco county courthouse in Bisbee
Flag of Cochise County, Arizona.gif
Flag
Cochise County, Arizona seal.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Cochise County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Arizona in United States.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 31°52′50″N109°45′13″W / 31.880555555556°N 109.75361111111°W / 31.880555555556; -109.75361111111
CountryFlag of the United States.svg United States
StateFlag of Arizona.svg  Arizona
FoundedFebruary 1, 1881
Named for Cochise
Seat Bisbee
Largest city Sierra Vista
Area
  Total6,219 sq mi (16,110 km2)
  Land6,166 sq mi (15,970 km2)
  Water53 sq mi (140 km2)  0.9%%
Population
 (2010)
  Total131,346
  Estimate 
(2019)
125,922
  Density21/sq mi (8.2/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain)
Congressional district 2nd
Website www.cochise.az.gov

Cochise County is located in the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. The population was 131,346 at the 2010 census. [1] The county seat is Bisbee. [2]

Contents

Cochise County includes the Sierra Vista-Douglas, Arizona Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county borders southwestern New Mexico and northeastern Sonora in Mexico.

History

In 1528 Spanish Explorers: Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Estevanico, and Fray Marcos de Niza [3] survived a shipwreck off the Texas coast. Captured by Native Americans, they spent eight years finding their way back to Mexico City, via the San Pedro Valley. Their journals, maps, and stories led to the Cibola, seven cities of gold myth. The Expedition of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1539 using it[ clarification needed ] as his route north through what they called the Guachuca Mountains of Pima [4] (Tohono O'odham) lands and later part of the mission routes north, but was actually occupied by the Sobaipuri descendants of the Hohokam. They found a large Pueblo (described as a small city) between present-day Benson and Whetstone, and several smaller satellite villages and smaller pueblos including ones on Fort Huachuca, Huachuca City and North Eastern Fry. About 1657 Father Kino visited the Sobaipuris [5] just before the Apache forced most from the valley, as they were struggling to survive due to increasing Chiricahua Apache attacks as they moved into the area of Texas Canyon of the Dragoon Mountains. In 1775, Presidio Santa Cruz de Terrenate [6] was founded on the west bank of the San Pedro River to protect the natives as well as the Spanish settlers who supplied the mission stations. The presidio was chronically short on provisions due to raids, however, and lacked personnel to adequately patrol the eastern route due to wars with France and England, so the main route north shifted west to the Santa Cruz valley, farther from the range of the Chiricahua Apache who almost exclusively controlled the area by 1821. [5] [7]

Cochise County was created on February 1, 1881, out of the eastern portion of Pima County. [8] It took its name from the legendary Chiricahua Apache war chief Cochise. [9] [10] The county seat was Tombstone until 1929 when it moved to Bisbee. Notable men who once held the position of County Sheriff were Johnny Behan, who served as the first sheriff of the new county, and who was one of the main characters during the events leading to and following the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Later, in 1886, Texas John Slaughter became sheriff. Lawman Jeff Milton and lawman/outlaw Burt Alvord both served as deputies under Slaughter.

A syndicated television series which aired from 1956 to 1958, Sheriff of Cochise starring John Bromfield, was filmed in Bisbee. The Jimmy Stewart movie Broken Arrow and subsequent television show of the same name starring John Lupton, which also aired from 1956 to 1958, took place (but was not filmed) in Cochise County.

J.A. Jance's Joanna Brady mystery series takes place in Cochise County, with Brady being the sheriff.

Beginning in the late 1950s, the small community of Miracle Valley was the site of a series of bible colleges and similar religious organizations, founded by television evangelist A. A. Allen. In 1982, Miracle Valley and neighboring Palominas were the site of a series of escalating conflicts between a newly arrived religious community and the county sheriff and deputies that culminated in the Miracle Valley shootout.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 6,219 square miles (16,110 km2), of which 6,166 square miles (15,970 km2) is land and 53 square miles (140 km2) (0.9%) is water. [11] Cochise County is close to the size of the States of Rhode Island and Connecticut combined.

Adjacent counties and municipios

Protected areas

The Big Room in Kartchner Caverns Kartchner Big Room.jpg
The Big Room in Kartchner Caverns
Fort Bowie site near Apache Pass. FortBowieSiteAZ2009.jpg
Fort Bowie site near Apache Pass.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 6,938
1900 9,25133.3%
1910 34,591273.9%
1920 46,46534.3%
1930 40,998−11.8%
1940 34,627−15.5%
1950 31,488−9.1%
1960 55,03974.8%
1970 61,91012.5%
1980 85,68638.4%
1990 97,62413.9%
2000 117,75520.6%
2010 131,34611.5%
Est. 2019125,922 [12] −4.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]
1790–1960 [14] 1900–1990 [15]
1990–2000 [16] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 117,755 people, 43,893 households, and 30,768 families residing in the county. The population density was 19 people per square mile (7/km2). There were 51,126 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 76.66% White, 4.52% Black or African American, 1.15% Native American, 1.65% Asian, 0.26% Pacific Islander, 12.05% from other races, and 3.72% from two or more races. 30.69% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 25.35% reported speaking Spanish at home, while 1.31% speak German .

The Copper Queen Hotel in Bisbee Copper Queen Hotel, Bisbee AZ.jpg
The Copper Queen Hotel in Bisbee

There were 43,893 households, out of which 32.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.10% were married couples living together, 11.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 25.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.30% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 101.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,105, and the median income for a family was $38,005. Males had a median income of $30,533 versus $22,252 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,988. About 13.50% of families and 17.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.80% of those under age 18 and 10.40% of those age 65 or over.

In 2000, the largest denominational group was the Catholics (with 25,837 adherents) and Evangelical Protestants (with 12,548 adherents). [17] The largest religious bodies were The Catholic Church (with 25,837 members) and The Southern Baptist Convention (with 5,999 members). [17]

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 131,346 people, 50,865 households, and 33,653 families residing in the county. [18] The population density was 21.3 inhabitants per square mile (8.2/km2). There were 59,041 housing units at an average density of 9.6 per square mile (3.7/km2). [19] The racial makeup of the county was 78.5% white, 4.2% black or African American, 1.9% Asian, 1.2% American Indian, 0.3% Pacific islander, 9.9% from other races, and 4.0% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 32.4% of the population. [18] The largest ancestry groups were: [20]

  • 28.3% Mexican
  • 16.2% German
  • 11.6% Irish
  • 9.8% English
  • 4.5% American
  • 3.7% Italian
  • 2.6% French
  • 2.1% Scottish
  • 2.0% Dutch
  • 1.9% Scotch-Irish
  • 1.9% Polish
  • 1.5% Norwegian
  • 1.1% Puerto Rican
  • 1.1% Swedish

Of the 50,865 households, 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.0% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.8% were non-families, and 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.02. The median age was 39.7 years. [18]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,876 and the median income for a family was $53,077. Males had a median income of $42,164 versus $31,019 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,010. About 11.8% of families and 15.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.2% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over. [21]

Politics

Cochise County leans strongly towards the Republican Party in Presidential elections. Although Bill Clinton carried the county narrowly in 1992, it has supported the Republican candidate by large margins in every other election since 1968, except for 1996 and 1976 when Clinton and Jimmy Carter each lost only narrowly. Although the county includes the relatively liberal town of Bisbee, as well as the city of Douglas, which has a large Latino population, this is outweighed by the heavily Republican tilt of the more populous Sierra Vista, which is adjacent to Fort Huachuca and thus has a heavy military presence.

Presidential elections results
Cochise County vote
by party in presidential elections
[22] [23]
Year Republican Democrat Others
2016 56.2% 28,09234.9% 17,4509.0% 4,473
2012 60.0% 29,49737.7% 18,5462.4% 1,158
2008 59.1% 29,02638.6% 18,9432.3% 1,112
2004 59.6% 26,55639.3% 17,5141.2% 525
2000 54.7% 18,18040.2% 13,3605.1% 1,701
1996 45.0% 14,36543.2% 13,78211.8% 3,776
1992 36.8% 12,20238.3% 12,70124.9% 8,247
1988 56.4% 15,81542.1% 11,8121.5% 423
1984 62.3% 16,40536.7% 9,6711.1% 279
1980 59.5% 13,35131.3% 7,0289.2% 2,066
1976 49.9% 9,92146.7% 9,2813.4% 681
1972 64.0% 11,70632.9% 6,0233.1% 570
1968 45.6% 7,61939.5% 6,59714.9% 2,495
1964 45.8% 7,64454.2% 9,0450.1% 8
1960 50.5% 7,57249.4% 7,4190.1% 16
1956 56.4% 6,89343.6% 5,3280.1% 9
1952 53.5% 6,49546.5% 5,640
1948 37.2% 3,85459.8% 6,1983.1% 318
1944 32.7% 3,37167.2% 6,9350.1% 13
1940 26.5% 3,17073.2% 8,7480.3% 32
1936 19.9% 2,09277.4% 8,1302.6% 277
1932 25.3% 2,83869.5% 7,7985.2% 580
1928 57.3% 5,77642.3% 4,2620.5% 45
1924 38.3% 3,71236.0% 3,49625.7% 2,491
1920 54.7% 5,34145.3% 4,430
1916 31.6% 3,20360.4% 6,1158.0% 814
1912 8.7% 40342.7%1,97348.6% 2,243 [lower-alpha 1]

In the United States House of Representatives, the county is part of Arizona's 2nd congressional district, which is represented by Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick; the majority of the district's population is in Tucson and its suburbs, which are far more liberal than Cochise County. In the Arizona Legislature, the county is part of the 14th district and is represented by Republican David Gowan in the State Senate and Republicans Gail Griffin and Becky Nutt in the State House of Representatives. This district also includes the entirety of Graham County and Greenlee County, as well as portions of Pima County.

Transportation

Major highways

State Route 80 seen towards north in Tombstone AZ 80 Tombstone.jpg
State Route 80 seen towards north in Tombstone

Airports

Bisbee Municipal Airport is owned by the City of Bisbee and located five nautical miles (9 km) southeast of its central business district [24]

Sierra Vista Municipal Airport (IATA: FHU, ICAO: KFHU, FAA LID: FHU), a joint-use civil-military airport which shares facilities with Libby Army Airfield, is located on Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, a city and U.S. Army installation in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. The airport has three runways and one helipad. It is mostly used for military aviation for the surrounding military base.

There are no commercial flights out of Cochise County; the nearest commercial airport is at Tucson approximately 70 miles from Sierra Vista.

Communities

Map of incorporated areas and unincorporated areas in Cochise County. Cochise County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of incorporated areas and unincorporated areas in Cochise County.

Cities

Towns

Ghost towns

Census-designated places

Other places

Military sites

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Cochise County. [25] [26]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1 Sierra Vista 43,888City1956
2 Douglas 17,378City1905
3 Sierra Vista Southeast 14,797 CDP
4Bisbee 5,575City1902
5 Benson 5,105City1880 (founded)
6 Willcox 3,757City1915
7 Whetstone 2,617CDP
8 Huachuca City 1,853Town1958
9 Mescal 1,812CDP
10 Pirtleville 1,744CDP
11 St. David 1,699CDP
12 Tombstone 1,380City1881
13 Naco 1,046CDP
14 Miracle Valley 644CDP
15 Elfrida 459CDP
16 Bowie 449CDP
17 Sunizona 281CDP
18 McNeal 238CDP
19 Palominas 212CDP
20 Dragoon 209CDP
21 San Simon 165CDP

See also

Notes

  1. This comprises 1,396 votes (30.2%) for Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, 819 votes (18.3%) for Socialist Eugene V. Debs, and 28 votes (0.6%) for Prohibition Party candidate Eugene W. Chafin.

Related Research Articles

Graham County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Graham County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,220, making it the third-least populous county in Arizona. The county seat is Safford.

Pima County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Pima County is a county in the south central region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 980,263, making it Arizona's second-most populous county. The county seat is Tucson, where nearly all of the population is centered. The county is named after the Pima Native Americans who are indigenous to this area.

Pinal County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Pinal County is a county in the central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. According to U.S. Census Bureau estimates in 2019, the population of the county was 462,789, making it Arizona's third-most populous county. The county seat is Florence. The county was founded in 1875.

Santa Cruz County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Santa Cruz is a county in southern Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population is 47,420. The county seat is Nogales. The county was established in 1899. It borders Pima County to the north and west, Cochise County to the east, and the Mexican state of Sonora to the south.

Yuma County, Arizona county in Arizona, US

Yuma County is a county in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 195,751. The county seat is Yuma.

Catron County, New Mexico U.S. county in New Mexico

Catron County is a county in the U.S. state of New Mexico. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,725, making it New Mexico's third-least populous county. Its county seat is Reserve. Catron County is New Mexico's largest county by area.

Benson, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Benson is a city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States, 45 miles (72 km) east-southeast of Tucson. It was founded as a rail terminal for the area, and still serves as such. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 5,105.

Bisbee, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Bisbee is a city and the county seat of Cochise County in southeastern Arizona, United States. It is 92 miles (148 km) southeast of Tucson and 11 miles (18 km) north of the Mexican border. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town was 5,575.

Huachuca City, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Huachuca City is a town in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,853.

Naco, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Naco, a Census-Designated Place (CDP) located in Cochise County, Arizona, United States had a recorded population of 1,046 during the 2010 census. It's located directly across the United States–Mexico border from its sister city Naco, Sonora. Naco is best known for an accidental 1929 air raid and is the first and only municipality in the Continental United States to have been aerially bombed by foreigners.

Sierra Vista, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Sierra Vista is a city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. As of the 2010 census the population of the city was 43,888. The city is part of the Sierra Vista-Douglas Metropolitan Area, with a 2010 population of 131,346. Fort Huachuca, a U.S. Army post, is located in the northwest part of the city.

Sierra Vista Southeast, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Sierra Vista Southeast, often referred to as Hereford or Nicksville, is a census-designated place (CDP) in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. The population was 14,797 at the 2010 census. It includes the neighborhoods Ramsey Canyon, and Sierra Vista Estates within its boundaries.

St. David, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

St. David is a census-designated place (CDP) in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,699 at the 2010 census.

Tombstone, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Tombstone is a historic city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States, founded in 1877 by prospector Ed Schieffelin in what was then Pima County, Arizona Territory. It became one of the last boomtowns in the American frontier. The town grew significantly into the mid-1880s as the local mines produced $40 to $85 million in silver bullion, the largest productive silver district in Arizona. Its population grew from 100 to around 14,000 in less than seven years. It is best known as the site of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and presently draws most of its revenue from tourism.

State Route 90 is a highway in Cochise County, Arizona that runs from the I-10 junction at Benson to a junction with State Route 80 between Bisbee and Tombstone. It is a north–south route north of Sierra Vista, and an east–west route east of the city. It passes through the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area at milepost 329; the riparian area makes up a large part of the southern section of the San Pedro Valley.

Area code 520 Area code in southern Arizona, United States

North American area code 520 is a state of Arizona telephone area code serving Tucson and most of the southeastern part of the state.

Huachuca Mountains mountain range in Arizona, United States

The Huachuca Mountain range is part of the Sierra Vista Ranger District of the Coronado National Forest. The Huachuca Mountains are located in Cochise County, Arizona approximately 70 miles (110 km) south-southeast of Tucson and southwest of the city of Sierra Vista, Arizona. Included in this area is the highest peak in the Huachucas, Miller Peak, and the region of the Huachucas known as Canelo Hills in eastern Santa Cruz County. The mountains range in elevation from 3,934 feet (1,199 m) at the base to 9,466 feet (2,885 m) at the top of Miller Peak. The second highest peak in this range is Carr Peak, elevation 9,200 feet (2,804 m). The Huachuca Mountain area is owned principally by the USDA Forest Service (41%), the U.S. Army (20%), and private land (32%). Sierra Vista is the main population center.

C. S. Fly American photographer

Camillus "Buck" Sydney Fly was an Old West photographer who is regarded by some as an early photojournalist and who captured the only known images of Native Americans while still at war with the United States. He took many other pictures of life in the mining boom town of Tombstone, Arizona and the surrounding region. He recognized the value of his photographs to illustrate periodicals of the day and took his camera to the scenes of important events where he deliberately recorded them and resold pictures to editors nationwide.

References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. A pictorial history of Sierra Vista, Arizona : more than a city, a way of life. Tritz, Judith. [Place of publication not identified]: Pediment Pub. 2006. ISBN   1597250589. OCLC   74175599.CS1 maint: others (link)
  4. Smith, Cornelius C (1981). FORT HUACHUCA: The story of a frontier post. U.S Government Printing Office: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
  5. 1 2 Jackson., Price, Ethel (2003). Sierra Vista : young city with a past. Charleston, SC: Arcadia. ISBN   0738524344. OCLC   53882709.
  6. "Fr. Kino's Visits to the San Pedro". www.saguaro-juniper.com. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  7. "Journey to Cochise County: Explore the lives and Stories of those who have make Cochise County their home". The Cochise County Historical Journal. Cochise County Historical Society along with the Smithsonian Museum to accompany the Main Street traveling exhibit "Journey Stories" February 22-April 5, 2014. 45 (1). Spring–Summer 2015.
  8. "Arizona Cultural Inventory Project". Archived from the original on 27 October 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  9. "Cochise County Arizona". County Website. Cochise County. 2009. Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  10. "Reminiscence of Early Days" (jpg). Tombstone (AZ) Weekly Epitaph. October 27, 1912. p. 4. Retrieved July 28, 2015 via Newspapers.com. I feel a paternal pride in Cochise county, for one Sunday 31 years ago, in the little law office of Will Hunsaker and myself in Tombstone, the committee selected the name, and I was one of the godfathers at the christening. Harry Wood, editor of the Tombstone Nugget, suggested the name in honor of the territorial Apache chief as a fitting companion to the dismal name of its county seat. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  11. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  12. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  13. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  14. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  15. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  16. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  17. 1 2 "County Membership Reports". thearda.com. Archived from the original on July 12, 2011. Retrieved August 22, 2011.
  18. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  19. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  20. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  21. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  22. "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections" . Retrieved 2011-06-11.
  23. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920–1964; pp. 42–44 ISBN   0405077114
  24. FAA Airport Master Record for P04 ( Form 5010 PDF )
  25. Center for New Media and Promotions(C2PO). "2010 Census" . Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  26. Geographic Products Branch. "2010 Census Block Maps – Geography – U.S. Census Bureau" . Retrieved 29 December 2014.

Coordinates: 31°52′50″N109°45′13″W / 31.88056°N 109.75361°W / 31.88056; -109.75361