Cocktails with cachaça

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There are many cocktails made with cachaça , the national spirit of Brazil. Caipirinha is by far the most popular and internationally well-known. [1]

Contents

Caipirinha

Caipirinha
IBA official cocktail
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Standard garnishlime [2]
Standard drinkware
Old Fashioned Glass.svg
Old Fashioned glass
IBA specified
ingredientsDagger-14-plain.png
PreparationPlace lime and sugar into old fashioned glass and muddle (mash the two ingredients together using a muddler or a wooden spoon). Fill the glass with crushed ice and add the Cachaça. [3]
NotesA wide variety of fresh fruits can be used in place of lime. In the absence of cachaça, vodka can be used, making a caipiroska. [4] If rum is used instead of cachaça it is called a caipiríssima, [5] while the use of sake makes it a sakerinha. [6]

The Caipirinha is Brazil's national cocktail made with cachaça, ice, sugar, and lime. It is the drink most commonly associated with cachaça.

In Brazil, other versions of caipirinha are made with different alcoholic beverages or fruits. A caipiroska or caipivodka is made with vodka instead of cachaça, while a caipiríssima is made with rum and a sakerinha, with sake. [7] Different from the mojito, the caipiríssima is made with crushed lime (not lime juice), and has no mint or soda water. If other fruit is used instead of lime, it is usually called a batida or caipifruta.

Batida

Batida
Cocktail
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Commonly used ingredients
PreparationMix and pour into chilled glass.

Batida is a Brazilian cocktail made with the national alcoholic drink cachaça . In Portuguese, batida means shaken or milkshake. It is made with cachaça, fruit juice (or coconut milk), and sugar. It can be blended or shaken with ice.

In Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, batidas are traditionally served with feijoada.

A variation is made adding sweet condensed milk or sour cream.

The most common fruit used in a Batida are lemon, passion fruit and coconut.

Rabo-de-galo

Rabo-de-galo, which means "cock tail" (in Brazilian Portuguese cocktail is called coquetel), is a Brazilian drink made of cachaça and red vermouth. The history of the Rabo de Galo dates back to 1950s and the inauguration of the Cinzano factory in São Paulo, [8] it is also known as Traçado, the Portuguese word for mixed. Alternatively, is known as a mixture of "everything you have in the bar" in some places. It is questionable whether the proportions in rabo-de-galo have ever been formally established. Most bartenders will simply "eyeball" the two ingredients, adjusting the proportions to the customer's taste. A quite common version calls for 2/3 of cachaça and 1/3 of vermouth. Rabo-de-galo is usually served straight up in large shot glasses. A popular variation in São Paulo, Brazil substitutes the vermouth with Cynar, an Italian bitter apéritif liqueur flavored with artichoke.

Caju Amigo (Friendly Cashew)

Caju amigo
Cocktail
Caju amigo.jpg
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedNeat; undiluted and without ice
Standard garnishSlice of cashew
Standard drinkware
Shot Glass (Standard).svg
Shot glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part cachaça
  • 1 slice of cashew, or 1 part cashew juice
PreparationThe slice is placed on the tongue and chased by the shot of cachaça. Or the two ingredients are mixed in a shot glass and served straight.

Caju Amigo, also known as Cajuzinho (Little Cashew), is a Brazilian drink made of cachaça and cashew juice. In some places, a slice of cashew is put in the drinker's mouth with a little bit of salt, chewed without swallowing, and a shot of cachaça is thrown back straight- swallowing the fruit and the drink at the same time.

Quentão (Hot Stuff)

Quentão
Cocktail
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedHot
Standard garnish citrus peel
Standard drinkware
Irish Coffee Glass (Mug).svg
Mug
Commonly used ingredients
Preparationcaramelize the sugar with the spices and peels, then add the liquids. Boil for a few minutes then serve hot.

Quentão, which means "very hot" or "big hot one", is a hot Brazilian drink made of cachaça and spices. It is often served during the celebrations known as Festas Juninas. The sugar is first caramelized with spices (whole cloves, cinnamon sticks and ginger chunks) and citrus peels (orange and lime). This mixture is then boiled with water for 10 minutes. The cachaça is added and boiled for another 5 minutes.

It is very common in southernmost parts of Brazil to use red wine instead of cachaça, the primary ingredient of Quentão, since this region is the largest wine producer in Brazil.

As the name suggests, it's meant to be served hot - ideally to be served outside on social gatherings on cold nights, near a fireplace. The ginger also adds to the sensation of warmth in the drink. The gingery flavor should be very distinctive, high notes of cloves must be present also. Nutmeg is an optional ingredient, used in some recipes.

Leite de Onça (Jaguar Milk)

Leite de Onça
Cocktail
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedNeat; undiluted and without ice
Standard garnishcinnamon or chocolate (optional)
Standard drinkwaremug (preferably a non-transparent one)
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part cachaça
  • 1 part milk
  • 1 part cocoa liqueur
  • 1/2 part of condensed milk
Preparationmix the condensed milk and the milk until they blend together. Add cachaça and let it rest. Add cocoa licor when it's ready to serve

Leite de onça (Jaguar milk) is a cold Brazilian drink made of cachaça and condensed milk. It is very sweet and has a very suave scent that evokes the homely atmosphere of a Festa Junina. It is not easy to replace the ingredients and achieve a similar result because its taste is very peculiar.

It is usually served cold, in plain mugs, without garnish (though often cinnamon or chocolate powder is sprinkled over) so that it looks like milk at a first glance.

Macunaíma

Macunaíma
Cocktail
Type Cocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
Served Straight up ; without ice
Standard drinkware
Old Fashioned Glass.svg
Old Fashioned glass
Commonly used ingredients
PreparationShake and strain into an Americano glass

The Macunaíma is a cocktail made with cachaça, sugar syrup, lime, and Fernet-Branca. It is shaken and served straight up in a "barriquinha", americano glass (a traditional Brazilian glass), or an old fashioned glass. Created by Arnaldo Hirai from Boca de Ouro bar in 2014, it is named after the famous novel Macunaíma by Mário de Andrade. [9]

Royce (Shaken)

Les Roysa
Cocktail
Type Mixed drink
Primary alcohol by volume
Servedrocks x
Standard drinkware
Zombie Glass.svg
Zombie glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 2 parts cachaça
  • 1 slice of each fresh orange, lemon and lime.
  • 1 ounce of guava juice.
  • 1 tbsp sugar
PreparationIn a mixing glass, mix sugar and fruit slices and press to juice fruit, add ice, guava juice and cachaça, mix again - pour into tall glass.
This cocktail was invented at Liberty Bar in Seattle, Washington in honor of Royce Gracie.

Royce is an American cocktail made with the Brazilian national spirit cachaça. This cocktail was named in honor of Royce Gracie, a great Brazilian jiu-jitsu fighter.

See also

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Martini (cocktail) Cocktail made with gin and vermouth

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Caipirinha Brazils national cocktail

Caipirinha is Brazil's national cocktail, made with cachaça, sugar, and lime. The drink is prepared by mixing the fruit and the sugar together, then adding the liquor. This can be made in a single large glass to be shared among people, or in a larger jar, from which it is served in individual glasses.

Daiquiri Family of cocktails with rum, citrus and some sweetener

Daiquiri is a family of cocktails whose main ingredients are rum, citrus juice, and sugar or other sweetener.

Cachaça distilled beverage

Cachaça is a distilled spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice. Also known as pinga, caninha, and other names, it is the most popular spirit among distilled alcoholic beverages in Brazil. Outside Brazil, cachaça is used almost exclusively as an ingredient in tropical drinks, with the caipirinha being the most famous cocktail. In Brazil, caipirinha is usually paired with the dish feijoada.

Punch (drink)

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Batida

Batida is a Brazilian cocktail, and is one of several Brazilian cocktails that are made with the national alcoholic drink cachaça. In Portuguese batida means shaken or milkshake, and the word also means a crash, usually used when referring to a car crash. This beverage is made with cachaça, fruit juice, and sugar. It is blended or shaken with ice.

Caipiroska

Caipiroska or caipivodka is a cocktail that is similar to a caipirinha, but prepared with vodka instead of the usual cachaça. It is a popular cocktail in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. It is also sometimes known as caipirodka. It has grown in popularity in recent years as access to international vodkas continues to diversify in South America.

<i>The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks</i> 1948 book about cocktails

The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks is a book about cocktails by David A. Embury, first published in 1948. The book is noteworthy for its witty, highly opinionated and conversational tone, as well as its categorization of cocktails into two main types: aromatic and sour; its categorization of ingredients into three categories: the base, modifying agents, and special flavorings and coloring agents; and its 1:2:8 ratio for sour type cocktails.

Polar Bear (cocktail)

A Polar Bear, After Eight or Peppermint Paddy is a mint chocolate cocktail that tastes like a York Peppermint Pattie or an After Eight wafer. It is usually made from crème de cacao and peppermint schnapps, although crème de menthe is a popular substitute.

Leblon Cachaça

Leblon Cachaça is a premium artisanal brand of the spirit cachaça produced at the Destilaria Maison Leblon in the Minas Gerais region of Brazil. Cachaça is the key ingredient to the caipirinha, Brazil’s national cocktail.

References

  1. Simonson, Robert (July 10, 2012). "Cachaça: Beyond a One-Note Samba". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  2. Lula da Silva, Luiz Inácio. "Decreto N° 4.851, de 2 de Outubro de 2003". Senado Federal Subsecretaria de Informações. Archived from the original on 2012-02-24. Retrieved 2011-07-14.
  3. "Caipirinha Recipe". Caipirinha Cocktail. Archived from the original on 2010-06-12.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  4. "Brazilian Drinks: Caipirinha". Maria's Cookbook. Maria-Brazil.org. Retrieved 2019-09-26.
  5. pt:Caipiríssima
  6. "Strawberry Sakerinha Recipe". The Blind Taste. Retrieved 2020-06-11.
  7. "Strawberry Sakerinha Recipe". The Blind Taste. Retrieved 2020-06-11.
  8. "BBMAG | Rabo de Galo: a new classic". BBMAG | Bossa Brazil Magazine. 2020-04-29. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  9. "Macunaíma, drinque clássico do Boca de Ouro". mixologynews. Retrieved April 7, 2020.