Colgate Darden

Last updated
Colgate Darden
Colgate Darden.jpg
3rd President of the University of Virginia
In office
June 23, 1947 September 1, 1959
Preceded by John Lloyd Newcomb
Succeeded by Edgar F. Shannon Jr.
54th Governor of Virginia
In office
January 21, 1942 January 16, 1946
Lieutenant William M. Tuck
Preceded by James H. Price
Succeeded by William M. Tuck
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Virginia's 2nd district
In office
January 3, 1939 March 1, 1941
Preceded by Norman R. Hamilton
Succeeded by Winder R. Harris
In office
January 3, 1935 January 3, 1937
Preceded byDistrict re-established
Menalcus Lankford before district abolished in 1933
Succeeded by Norman R. Hamilton
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Virginia's At-large district
In office
March 4, 1933 January 3, 1935
Preceded byDistrict re-established
John S. Wise before district abolished in 1885
Succeeded byDistrict abolished
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates for Norfolk City
In office
January 8, 1930 January 11, 1933
Preceded by Sarah Lee Fain
Succeeded by Richard W. Ruffin
Personal details
BornColgate Whitehead Darden Jr.
(1897-02-11)February 11, 1897
Southampton County, near Franklin, Virginia
Died June 9, 1981(1981-06-09) (aged 84)
Norfolk, Virginia
Resting place Beechwood Plantation, now Jericho, Southampton County, VA
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Constance Simons Du Pont
Alma mater University of Virginia
Columbia Law School
Oxford University
Profession Educator
Awards French Croix de guerre
Military service
AllegianceFlag of the United States (1912-1959).svg  United States
Flag of France.svg  France
Service/branch French Army
Flag of the United States Marine Corps.svg  United States Marine Corps
Rank Lieutenant
Battles/wars World War I

Colgate Whitehead Darden Jr. (February 11, 1897 – June 9, 1981) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Virginia (1933–37, 1939–41), the 54th Governor of Virginia (1942–46), Chancellor of the College of William and Mary (1946–47) and the third President of the University of Virginia (1947–59). The Darden Graduate School of Business Administration of the University of Virginia was named for him.

Democratic Party (United States) political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

Virginia State of the United States of America

Virginia, officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a state in the Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The Commonwealth's estimated population as of 2018 is over 8.5 million.

Contents

Early life

Darden was born on Marle Hill, [1] a farm in Southampton County, Virginia, [2] near Franklin, to Katherine Lawrence (Pretlow) Darden (1870–1936) and Colgate Whitehead Darden Sr. (1867–1945). Darden served in the French Army and as a lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps Air Service during World War I. [3] He later attended the University of Virginia, where he was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, and graduated in 1922 before going on to Columbia Law School (graduated 1923) and then Oxford University. He was admitted to the bar and opened practice in Norfolk, Virginia. He was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1930 to 1933.

Southampton County, Virginia County in the United States

Southampton County is a county located on the southern border of the Commonwealth of Virginia. North Carolina is to the south. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,570. Its county seat is Courtland.

Franklin, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Franklin is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,582. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Franklin with Southampton County for statistical purposes.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines or U.S. Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

Congressional service

Darden was elected as a Democratic U.S. Representative in an At-large election to the 73rd Congress, and re-elected in the 2nd district to the 74th Congress, and served from March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1937. He was not re-elected to the 75th Congress in 1936, but was re-elected in 1938 and 1940 to the 76th and 77th Congresses and served from January 3, 1939 – March 1, 1941, when he resigned to run for Governor of Virginia.

73rd United States Congress

The seventy-third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1933, to January 3, 1935, during the first two years of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency. Because of the newly ratified 20th Amendment, the duration of this Congress, along with the term of office of those elected to it, was shortened by the interval between January 3 and March 4, 1935. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifteenth Census of the United States in 1930. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Virginia's second congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It currently encompasses all of Accomack and Northampton Counties, portions of York County, and the cities of Virginia Beach and Williamsburg and parts of the cities of Norfolk and Hampton, although its boundaries changed greatly over the centuries. Republican Scott Rigell defeated Democrat Glenn Nye in the November 2, 2010 election, and took his seat January 3, 2011 until 2017, when he was succeeded by Scott Taylor. In the November 6, 2018 election, Elaine Luria defeated Scott Taylor. It is now considered one of Virginia's most competitive congressional districts.

74th United States Congress

The Seventy-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1935, to January 3, 1937, during the third and fourth years of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifteenth Census of the United States in 1930. Both chambers had a Democratic supermajority.

Electoral history

Governor of Virginia

Darden was elected Governor of Virginia with 80.72% of the vote, defeating Republican Benjamin Muse, Communist Alice Burke, and Socialist M. Hilliard Bernstein. Darden was inaugurated January 21, 1942, serving until January 16, 1946. As governor, he reorganized Virginia's civil defense, reformed the penal system, and created a pension plan for state employees and teachers.

Benjamin Muse was an American lawyer, soldier, diplomat, newspaper publisher, author and politician. He briefly who served as a member of the Virginia Senate. In 1941 Muse, running as the Republican candidate for Governor of Virginia, lost overwhelmingly to Democrat Colgate Darden, a member of the state's Byrd Organization. Later, Muse lived in Manassas, Virginia, from where he opposed and chronicled the Massive Resistance crisis fostered by U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd and Richmond newspaperman James J. Kilpatrick as they fomented opposition to the United States Supreme Court decisions in Brown v. Board of Education which overturned racial segregation in public schools.

President of the University of Virginia

Darden was elected president of the University of Virginia in 1947, despite public misgivings from some among the university faculty, who resented his lack of faculty experience, and a portion of the student body, who feared that he planned to abolish the fraternity system at the university. The latter concern had its origin in Darden's actions as Governor of Virginia, where he recommended barring students at the College of William and Mary from living in fraternity or sorority houses on the grounds that it was "undemocratic" and placed undue financial burden on parents. While Darden did not impose similar restrictions at Virginia, he did attempt to implement other measures, such as a ban on first year rushing. [4]

At Virginia, Darden was responsible for the building of the student union building, named Newcomb Hall for his predecessor John Lloyd Newcomb; the establishment of the Judiciary Committee, which handled student misconduct that did not rise to the level of an honor offense; the creation of the graduate school of business administration, named in his memory; and significant improvements to faculty salaries. Upon his retirement, he was presented with the Thomas Jefferson Award and the Raven Award. [5]

John Lloyd Newcomb was an American educator. He served as the second president of the University of Virginia, ascending to the position after the death of Edwin Alderman. Newcomb, a member of the engineering faculty of the University, oversaw the University through the Depression and the Second World War and managed its physical expansion, including the building of Scott Stadium, the Bayly Art Museum, and Alderman Library.

Raven Society Honor society at the University of Virginia

The Raven Society is an honor society at the University of Virginia. Founded in 1904 by University student William McCully James, and named in honor of the famous poem by Edgar Allan Poe. According to its constitution, one of the Raven Society's main goals is "to bring together the best men in the various departments of the university for mutual acquaintance and for cooperation in their efforts to protect the honor and dignity of the university."

Other service and death

Darden was appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as a U.S. delegate to the United Nations General Assembly in 1955. He died in 1981 at his home in Norfolk, Virginia. [6] He was buried in the family plot with his parents. In addition to his wife, he was survived by his younger brother Joshua Pretlow Darden, who was a mayor of Norfolk, Virginia (1949–50). Darden is memorialized with a historic marker at the site of his birth. [1]

Miscellaneous

Darden's friends include Tidewater resident Barham Gary, whose sister, writer Myra Page, refers to Darden by the nickname "Clukey." [7]

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .

  1. 1 2 "Marle Hill U-119". Marker History. Retrieved 2017-04-18.
  2. "Gov. Colgate W. Darden subject of historical society meeting - The Tidewater News".
  3. Heinemann, Ronald L. "Darden, Colgate W. (1897–1981)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved 2016-04-27.
  4. Dabney, Virginius (1981). Mr. Jefferson's University: A History. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. pp. 271–274. ISBN   0-8139-0904-X.
  5. Dabney, 417-418.
  6. Barbanel, Josh (June 10, 1981). "Colgate W. Darden Jr. Dies". The New York Times . pp. B6. Retrieved June 21, 2008.
  7. Page, Myra; Baker, Christina Looper (1996). In a Generous Spirit: A First-Person Biography of Myra Page. University of Illinois Press. p. 102. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District re-established
John S. Wise before district abolished in 1885
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's at-large congressional seat

1933–1935
Succeeded by
District abolished
Preceded by
District re-established
Menalcus Lankford before district abolished in 1933
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 2nd congressional district

1935–1937
Succeeded by
Norman R. Hamilton
Preceded by
Norman R. Hamilton
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 2nd congressional district

1937–1941
Succeeded by
Winder R. Harris
Political offices
Preceded by
James H. Price
Governor of Virginia
1942–1946
Succeeded by
William M. Tuck