Colonial Police Long Service Medal

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Colonial Police Long Service Medal
Colonial Police Long Service Medal, Reverse.jpg
Reverse of medal, 1934–2012
TypeLong service medal
Awarded for18 years efficient service
Presented bythe United Kingdom
EligibilityFull-time members of the police forces of colonies and overseas territories
Clasps 25 years
30 years [1]
Established23 March 1934
Colonial Police Medal.png
Ribbon bar
Order of Wear
Next (higher) Sierra Leone Police Long Service Medal [2]
Next (lower) Sierra Leone Fire Brigades Long Service Medal [2]
Related Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
Colonial Fire Brigades Long Service Medal
Colonial Special Constabulary Medal
Colonial Prison Service Medal

The Colonial Police Long Service Medal was established in 1934 to recognise long service in the police forces of the colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. On 10 April 2012 the medal became known as the Overseas Territories Police Long Service Medal. [3]

Contents

History

The medal was originally established on 23 March 1934 as the Colonial Police and Fire Brigade Long Service Medal. A new Royal Warrant issued on 21 March 1956 provided for separate Colonial Police and Fire Brigade medals under their own warrants, [4] with the name of medal changing to Colonial Police Long Service Medal. [5] The name was again changed in 2012 to the Overseas Territories Police Long Service Medal. [3] This reflected the change in the way Britain's remaining colonies were described, they being classed as 'Overseas Territories' from 2002. [6]

The medal is awarded for 18 years full-time, continuous and efficient service in the Police Force of any British Colony or Overseas Territory. [7] Service in more than one colony can qualify, as can previous service in any police force entitled to the Police Long Service and Good Conduct Medal, while excluding any service for which this medal has already been awarded. Compulsory service in the British armed forces or Merchant Navy which interrupted, and was continuous with, qualifying police service counts. [4]

Clasps are awarded for completing 25 and 30 years service respectively. In undress uniform, when only ribbons are worn, these clasps are represented by silver rosettes attached to the ribbon. [8]

Appearance

The medal is circular, silver and 36 mm (1.4 in) in diameter. The obverse depicts the effigy of the reigning sovereign surrounded by the royal titles. To date, there have been six types of obverse, the date in brackets showing the year the design was introduced:

The reverse depicts a police officer's truncheon superimposed on a laurel wreath. Circumscribed around the central design are the words FOR LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT and COLONIAL POLICE FORCES. In 2012 this latter wording was changed to OVERSEAS TERRITORIES POLICE FORCES. The name and details of the recipient are engraved on the edge of the medal. [8]

The medal hangs from a ring with claw suspension. The ribbon of the medal is dark blue with a wide central stripe of green, with the centre stripe bordered by thin stripes of white. The clasps for further service are attached to the ribbon and are silver and decorated with a spray of laurel.

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Queens Police Medal Award

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General Service Medal (1918) Award

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Imperial Service Medal Award

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Meritorious Service Medal (United Kingdom) British military decoration

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Medal for Long Service and Good Conduct (Military) Award

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Efficiency Medal (South Africa) Award

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Burma Gallantry Medal Award

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Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers Decoration Award

The Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration, post-nominal letters VD, was established in 1899 as recognition for long and meritorious service as a part-time commissioned officer in any of the organized military forces of the British Colonies, Dependencies and Protectorates. It superseded the Volunteer Officers' Decoration for India and the Colonies in all these territories, but not in the Indian Empire.

The Hong Kong Disciplined Services Medal was a long service medal awarded to members of the Hong Kong Disciplined Services in British Hong Kong. Established by Royal Warrant 8 July 1986, the award of the medal was intended to replace the awarding of the Imperial Service Medal. This medal was replaced by both the Hong Kong Customs & Excise Long Service Medal and the Hong Kong Immigration Service Long Service Medal, for long service to members of the respective disciplined services, upon the transfer of sovereignty in 1997, however the same ribbon continues to be used for the Hong Kong Immigration Service Long Service Medal.

Colonial Prison Service Medal Award

The Colonial Prison Service Medal was established on 28 October 1955 as a long service medal of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. On 10 April 2012 the medal became known as the Overseas Territories Prison Service Medal, and underwent a minor change in design. This reflected the change in the way Britain's remaining colonies were described, they having been classed as 'Overseas Territories' from 2002.

Colonial Fire Brigades Long Service Medal Award

The Colonial Fire Brigades Long Service Medal, now known as the Overseas Territories Fire Brigades Long Service Medal, was established in 1934 to recognise long service in the fire services of the colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom.

Colonial Special Constabulary Medal Award

The Colonial Special Constabulary Medal was established on 1 April 1957 as a volunteer and part-time long service medal of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. On 10 April 2012 the medal became known as the Overseas Territories Special Constabulary Medal, and underwent a minor change in design. This reflected the change in the way Britain's remaining colonies were described, they being classed as 'Overseas Territories' from 2002.

Medals of Sierra Leone (1961–1971)

A number of new Sierra Leone medals were instituted in the decade from 1961, when the country gained independence.

References

  1. Cyprus (1958), Cyprus Gazette, p. 351, retrieved 10 July 2013
  2. 1 2 "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3352.
  3. 1 2 "No. 60172". The London Gazette . 14 June 2012. p. 11415.
  4. 1 2 "No. 45518". The London Gazette . 11 November 1971. p. 12242.
  5. "No. 41285". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 January 1958. p. 365.Confirms separate Police and Fire Brigade medals.
  6. Legislation.gov.uk (2011). "British Overseas Territories Act 2002". The National Archives.(Accessed 18 January 2019)
  7. Kenya Gazette, 37, 10 December 1935, p. 1299, retrieved 10 July 2013
  8. 1 2 John Mussell (ed). Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 258. Published by Token Publishing Ltd. Honiton, Devon.