Comanche Peak Wilderness

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Comanche Peak Wilderness
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
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Location Larimer County, Colorado, USA
Nearest city Fort Collins, Colorado
Coordinates 40°34′58″N105°40′07″W / 40.58278°N 105.66861°W / 40.58278; -105.66861 [1] Coordinates: 40°34′58″N105°40′07″W / 40.58278°N 105.66861°W / 40.58278; -105.66861 [2]
Area66,791 acres (27,029 ha)
Established1980
Governing body U.S. Forest Service

The Comanche Peak Wilderness is a U.S. Wilderness Area located in the Roosevelt National Forest on the Canyon Lakes Ranger District in Colorado along the northern boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park. The 66,791-acre (27,029 ha) wilderness named for its most prominent peak was established in 1980. There are 121 miles (195 km) of hiking trails inside the wilderness. Roosevelt National Forest and Rocky Mountain National Park officially maintain 19 trails within the Wilderness, 5 of which pass into Rocky Mountain National Park. There are also 7 named peaks, 6 named lakes (including Comanche Reservoir) and 16 named rivers and creeks within the wilderness boundaries. [3] [4] [5] [6]

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References

  1. "Comanche Peak Wilderness". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  2. "Comanche Peak Wilderness". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  3. "Comanche Peak Wilderness". Wilderness.net. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  4. "Comanche Peak Wilderness". Colorado Wilderness. Retrieved August 9, 2012.
  5. Grim, Joe; Grim, Frédérique (2010). Comanche Peak Wilderness Area: Hiking and Snowshoeing Guide. Colorado Mountain Club Press. ISBN   9780984221318.
  6. "Comanche Peak Wilderness". U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved August 9, 2012.