Combat of Korneuburg

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Combat of Korneuburg
Part of the War of the Fifth Coalition
Date7 July 1809
Location Korneuburg, present-day Austria, then Austrian Empire
Result French victory
Belligerents
Flag of France.svg French Empire Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg Austrian Empire
Commanders and leaders
Flag of France.svg Claude Legrand Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg Johann von Klenau
Strength
13,000 men
24 cannons
18,000 men
64 cannons
Casualties and losses
350 men at least 300 men

The Combat of Korneuburg was a relatively minor rearguard action fought by Austrian VI Korps of the Kaiserlich-königliche Hauptarmee under Johann von Klenau against elements of the French IV Corps of the Grande Armée d'Allemagne, under the command of Claude Legrand. The brief combat ended in favour of the French. [1]

A rearguard is that part of a military force that protects it from attack from the rear, either during an advance or withdrawal. The term can also be used to describe forces protecting lines, such as communication lines, behind an army. Even more generally, a rearguard action may refer idiomatically to an attempt at preventing something though it is likely too late to be prevented; this idiomatic meaning may apply in either a military or non-military context.

Austrian Empire monarchy in Central Europe between 1804 and 1867

The Austrian Empire was a Central European multinational great power from 1804 to 1867, created by proclamation out of the realms of the Habsburgs. During its existence, it was the third most populous empire after the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom in Europe. Along with Prussia, it was one of the two major powers of the German Confederation. Geographically, it was the third largest empire in Europe after the Russian Empire and the First French Empire. Proclaimed in response to the First French Empire, it partially overlapped with the Holy Roman Empire until the latter's dissolution in 1806.

Imperial and Royal Army during the Napoleonic Wars

The Imperial and Royal or Imperial Austrian Army was strictly speaking, the armed force of the Holy Roman Empire under its last monarch, the Habsburg Emperor Francis II, although in reality, it was nearly all composed of the Habsburg army. When the Holy Roman Empire was dissolved in 1806, it assumed its title of the Army of the Austrian Empire under the same monarch, now known as Emperor Francis I of Austria.

Contents

Context and battle

Following the French victory at the battle of Wagram the day before, the commander of the Kaiserlich-königliche Hauptarmee, the main Austrian army, Archduke Charles of Austria-Teschen, organised an orderly retreat towards Bohemia. Archduke Charles detailed Klenau, with 18,000 men and 64 cannons to delay the French pursuit, which was spearheaded in this sector by the French IV Corps of Marshal André Masséna. Masséna had formed a vanguard under the overall command of General Legrand, whose command (13,000 men and 24 cannons) included Legrand's own 1st division of IV Corps, the Corps cavalry under General Jacob François Marulaz and the cuirassiers from the 2nd heavy cavalry division of General Raymond-Gaspard de Bonardi de Saint-Sulpice. These forces made contact with the Austrian Corps on 7 July near Korneuburg, around 19 kilometers northwest of Vienna. After a brief engagement, the French broke through and Klenau promptly retreated. The French had around 350 men killed or wounded, while the total Austrian losses are unknown, but included 300 prisoners of war. [1]

Battle of Wagram battle

The Battle of Wagram was a military engagement of the Napoleonic Wars that ended in a costly but decisive victory for Emperor Napoleon I's French and allied army against the Austrian army under the command of Archduke Charles of Austria-Teschen. The battle led to the breakup of the Fifth Coalition, the Austrian and British-led alliance against France.

Bohemia Historical land in Czech Republic

Bohemia is the westernmost and largest historical region of the Czech lands in the present-day Czech Republic. In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings.

Marshal of the Empire military rank

Marshal of the Empire was a civil dignity during the First French Empire. It was created by Sénatus-consulte on 18 May 1804 and to a large extent resurrected the formerly abolished title of Marshal of France. According to the Sénatus-consulte, a Marshal was a grand officer of the Empire, entitled to a high-standing position at the Court and to the presidency of an electoral college.

Bibliography

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References

  1. 1 2 Pigeard, 424-425