Come Together

Last updated

"Come Together"
Come Together-Something (single cover).jpg
1989 UK reissue picture sleeve
Single by the Beatles
from the album Abbey Road
A-side "Something" (double A-side)
Released6 October 1969 (1969-10-06)
Recorded21–30 July 1969
Studio EMI, London
Genre
Length4:19
Label Apple
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin
The Beatles singles chronology
"The Ballad of John and Yoko"
(1969)
"Something" / "Come Together"
(1969)
"Let It Be"
(1970)
Audio sample

Certifications and sales

RegionCertification Certified units/sales
Denmark (IFPI Danmark) [79] Gold45,000
Italy (FIMI) [80]
sales since 2009
Platinum70,000
Spain (PROMUSICAE) [81] Platinum60,000
United Kingdom (BPI) [82]
sales since 2010
Platinum600,000
United States1,750,000 [83]
Summaries
Worldwide
original release
2,500,000 [83]

Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

Cover versions

Ike & Tina Turner version

"Come Together"
Ike-Tina-Turner-Come-Together-Single.jpg
French picture sleeve
Single by Ike & Tina Turner & the Ikettes
from the album Come Together
B-side "Honky Tonk Women"
ReleasedDecember 1969 (1969-12)
Length3:37
Label
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) Ike Turner
Ike & Tina Turner singles chronology
"I Wanna Jump"
(1969)
"Come Together"
(1969)
"I Want to Take You Higher"
(1970)
The Ikettes singles chronology
"Make 'Em Wait"
(1968)
"Come Together"
(1969)
"I Want to Take You Higher"
(1970)

A month after the original version by the Beatles was released, Ike & Tina Turner began performing their rendition of "Come Together," most notably at Madison Square Garden in November 1969. [84] Due to the public response to their live performances, Minit Records rushed the release of a studio version. [85] The single, also credited to the Ikettes, was released in December 1969. [86] It reached number 57 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 21 on the Billboard R&B Singles chart. [87] [88] The B-side features another soul-infused rock cover, "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones. [89]

"Come Together" is the lead single from Ike & Tina Turner's 1970 album of the same name. [90] The song has been released on various compilations, including Greatest Hits (1976), Proud Mary: The Best of Ike & Tina Turner (1991), and The Ike & Tina Turner Story: 1960–1975 (2007). A live version was recorded at L'Olympia in Paris on 30 January 1971, and released later that year on their live album Live in Paris .

John Lennon solo version

"Come Together" was the only Beatles song Lennon sang during his 1972 Madison Square Garden concerts. It was Lennon's only full-length concert performance after leaving the Beatles. [91] He was backed by the band Elephant's Memory. [92] This version of the song appears on the concert album Live in New York City , [93] recorded on 30 August 1972 and released in 1986.

Aerosmith version

"Come Together"
Cometogetheraero.JPG
Single by Aerosmith
from the album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
B-side "Kings and Queens"
Released31 July 1978 (1978-07-31)
Recorded1978
Length3:46
Label Columbia
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) Jack Douglas
Aerosmith singles chronology
"Get It Up"
(1978)
"Come Together"
(1978)
"Chip Away the Stone"
(1978)
Music video
"Come Together" (audio) on YouTube

American hard rock band Aerosmith recorded one of the most successful cover versions of "Come Together" in 1978. The band performed the song in the 1978 film Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band ; their recording appeared on its accompanying soundtrack album. [94] Released as a single in July 1978, Aerosmith's version was an immediate success, reaching number 23 on the Billboard Hot 100, [95] following on the heels of a string of Top 40 hits for the band in the mid-1970s. However, it would be the last Top 40 hit for the band for nearly a decade.

Another recording of the song was released several months later on Aerosmith's live album Live! Bootleg . The song also featured on Aerosmith's Greatest Hits , the band's first singles compilation released in 1980. Their live performance from the 33rd Annual Grammy Awards ceremony was released in a Grammy compilation CD. The song has also surfaced on a number of Aerosmith compilations and live albums since then, as well as on the soundtrack for the film Armageddon . [96]

Godsmack version

Godsmack released Come Together in 2012 on the Live & Inspired album. An official music video was released and the single entered the Hard Rock Charts at number 11, then in 2017 resurfaced to land at position No. 1 on Billboard's Hard Rock Digital Song Sales chart.

Gary Clark Jr. and Junkie XL version

  1. Because Emerick quit EMI a week before the session, the session also marked the first time a freelance engineer worked for the studio. [14]
  2. In the intervening time, Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono, released "Give Peace a Chance" as the Plastic Ono Band, [14] recorded on 1 June 1969 and released in the beginning of July 1969. [16]
  3. McCartney recalled being happy at Lennon's praise, further stating: "Whenever [John] did praise any of us, it was great praise, indeed, because he didn't dish it out much. If ever you got a speck of it, a crumb of it, you were quite grateful". [23]

Related Research Articles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hey Jude</span> 1968 single by the Beatles

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<i>Abbey Road</i> 1969 studio album by the Beatles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Maxwell's Silver Hammer</span> 1969 song by the Beatles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">The Ballad of John and Yoko</span> 1969 single by the Beatles

"The Ballad of John and Yoko" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles that was released as a non-album single in May 1969. It was written by John Lennon and credited to the Lennon–McCartney partnership, and chronicles the events surrounding the wedding of Lennon and Yoko Ono. The song was the Beatles' 17th UK number-one single and their last for 54 years until "Now and Then" in 2023. In the United States, it was banned by some radio stations due to the lyrics' reference to Christ and crucifixion. The single peaked at number 8 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The song has subsequently appeared on compilation albums such as Hey Jude, 1967–1970, Past Masters, and 1.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oh! Darling</span> 1969 song by The Beatles

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hey Bulldog</span> 1969 song by the Beatles

"Hey Bulldog" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles released on their 1969 soundtrack album Yellow Submarine. Credited to Lennon–McCartney, but written primarily by John Lennon, it was finished in the recording studio by both Lennon and Paul McCartney. The song was recorded during the filming of the "Lady Madonna" promotional film, and, with "Lady Madonna", is one of the few Beatles songs based on a piano riff.

<i>Yellow Submarine</i> (album) 1969 studio album/soundtrack by the Beatles

Yellow Submarine is the tenth studio album by the English rock band the Beatles, released in January 1969. It is the soundtrack to the animated film of the same name, which premiered in London in July 1968. The album contains six songs by the Beatles, including four new songs and the previously released "Yellow Submarine" and "All You Need Is Love". The remainder of the album is a re-recording of selections from the film's orchestral soundtrack by the band's producer, George Martin.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Komm, gib mir deine Hand / Sie liebt dich</span> 1964 single by the Beatles

"Komm, gib mir deine Hand" and "Sie liebt dich" are German-language versions of "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "She Loves You", respectively, by the English rock band the Beatles. Both John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote the original English songs, credited to the Lennon–McCartney partnership, while Camillo Felgen wrote the translated German lyrics. Felgen is credited under several of his pen names. In places, his translations take major liberties with the original lyrics. Odeon Records released the German versions together as a non-album single in West Germany in March 1964. Swan Records released "Sie liebt dich", along with the original "She Loves You" B-side "I'll Get You", as a single in the United States in May 1964. Capitol included "Komm, gib mir deine Hand" as the closing track of the 1964 North American-only album Something New.

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Sources

"Come Together"
Cometogethergaryclarkjr.jpg
Single by Gary Clark Jr. & Junkie XL
from the album Justice League: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Released8 September 2017 (2017-09-08)
Length3:13
Label
Songwriter(s) Lennon–McCartney
Producer(s) Junkie XL
Gary Clark Jr. singles chronology
"Ride"
(2017)
"Come Together"
(2017)
"I'm On 3.0"
(2017)
Junkie XL singles chronology
"Cities in Dust"
(2008)
"Come Together"
(2017)