Comedy of Errors (horse)

Last updated
Comedy of Errors
Sire Goldhill
GrandsireLe Dieu d'Or
DamComedy Actress
Damsire Kingsway
Sex Gelding
Foaled1967
Country United Kingdom
Colour Brown
BreederElizabeth Sykes
OwnerTed Wheatley
Trainer Fred Rimell
Record48:23-11-4
Major wins
Fighting Fifth Hurdle (1972, 1973, 1974)
Cheltenham Trial (1973, 1974)
Irish Sweeps Hurdle (1973, 1974)
Champion Hurdle (1973, 1975)
Welsh Champion Hurdle (1973)
Scottish Champion Hurdle (1975)
Templegate Hurdle (1976)
Awards
Timeform rating 178 [1]

Comedy of Errors (19671990) was a champion British Thoroughbred National Hunt racehorse. He won the Champion Hurdle in 1973 and 1975, becoming one of only two horses to regain British hurdling's top prize. A huge horse of over 17 hands, "Comedy", as he was affectionately known, won 23 races. Timeform rate him among the top half-dozen hurdlers ever in Britain. [2]

Contents

Background

Comedy of Errors was a brown horse sired by the King's Stand Stakes winner Goldhill out of the mare Comedy Actress. He was trained by Fred Rimell at Kinnersley in Worcestershire. and ridden by Bill Smith and Ken White.

Racing career

Comedy of Errors finished second in the Gloucestershire Hurdle at the 1972 Cheltenham Festival.

In 1973 he won his first Champion Hurdle, beating Bula who had won the race in 1971 and 1972.

He finished runner-up to Lanzarote in the 1974 championship but returned to regain the title in 1975.

Retirement

After his retirement, Comedy of Errors was used for many years by Fred Rimell's wife Mercy who described him as being a perfect riding horse.

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References