Connecticut's 4th congressional district

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Connecticut's 4th congressional district
Connecticut's 4th congressional district
Connecticut's 4th congressional district
Connecticut's 4th congressional district
Connecticut's 4th congressional district
District boundaries
Representative
  Jim Himes
DCos Cob
Area539 sq mi (1,400 km2)
Distribution
  • 95.76% urban
  • 4.24% rural
Population (2021)745,760
Median household
income
$102,517 [1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVI D+12 [2]

Connecticut's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Located in the southwestern part of the state, the district is largely suburban and extends from Bridgeport, the largest city in the state, to Greenwich – an area largely coextensive with the Connecticut side of the New York metropolitan area. The district also extends inland, toward Danbury and toward the Lower Naugatuck Valley.

Contents

The district is currently represented by Democrat Jim Himes. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of D+12, it is the one of the more Democratic districts in Connecticut, a state with an all-Democratic congressional delegation. [2]

Towns in the district

The district includes the following towns:

Fairfield CountyBridgeport, Darien, Easton, Fairfield, Greenwich, Monroe, New Canaan, Norwalk, Redding, Ridgefield, Shelton (part), Stamford, Trumbull, Weston, Westport, and Wilton.

New Haven CountyOxford.

Voter registration

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 30, 2012 [3]
PartyActiveInactiveTotalPercentage
Democratic 141,3559,427150,78236.17%
Republican 98,6635,106103,76924.89%
Minor Parties3,7373124,0490.97%
Unaffiliated146,21812,043158,26137.97%
Total389,97326,888416,861100.00%

Recent presidential elections

Historically, the 4th was a classic "Yankee Republican" district. However, it has not supported a Republican for president since 1988, and has swung increasingly Democratic at the national level since the 1990s. This culminated in 2020, when Joe Biden won it with 64 percent of the vote, his best showing in the state.

Election results from presidential races
YearOfficeResults
2000 President Gore 55–41%
2004 President Kerry 52–46%
2008 President Obama 60–40%
2012 President Obama 55–44%
2016 President Clinton 60–37%
2020 President Biden 64–35%

Recent elections

Even as the district swung increasingly Democratic at the national level, Republicans usually held this district without serious difficulty until the turn of the millennium. In 2004, however, Democrat Diane Farrell held longtime incumbent Chris Shays to only 52 percent of the vote, the closest race in the district in 30 years. Shays fended off an equally spirited challenge from Farrell in 2006 before losing to Himes in 2008. Himes has held the seat ever since.

1987 (special)

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1987: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays 50,51857%
Democratic Christine Niedermeier37,29342%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 87,811100%

1988

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1988: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)147,84372%
Democratic Roger J. Pearson55,75127%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 203,594100%

1990

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1990: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)105,68277%
Democratic Al Smith32,35223%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 138,034100%

1992

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1992: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)147,81667%
Democratic Dave Schropfer58,66627%
A Connecticut Party (1990) Al Smith11,6795%
Natural Law Ronald M. Fried1,4451%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 219,606100%

1994

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1994: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)109,43674%
Democratic Jonathan Kantrowitz34,96224%
Libertarian Irving Sussman1,9761%
Natural Law Terry M. Nevas6880.47%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 147,062100%

1996

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1996: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)121,94960%
Democratic William Finch 75,90238%
Libertarian Edward H. Tonkin2,8151%
Natural Law Terry M. Nevas1,0461%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 201,712100%

1998

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 1998: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)94,76769%
Democratic Jonathan Kantrowitz40,98828%
Libertarian Marshall C. Harrison1,4491%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 137,204100%

2000

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2000: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)119,15558%
Democratic Stephanie Sanchez84,47241%
Libertarian Daniel Gislao2,0341%
Independent Frank M. Don1,0970.53%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 206,758100%

2002

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2002: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)113,19764%
Democratic Stephanie Sanchez62,49136%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 175,688100%

2004

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2004: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)149,89152%
Democratic Diane Farrell 136,48148%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 286,372100%

2006

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2006: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)106,51051%
Democratic Diane Farrell 99,45048%
Libertarian Phil Maymin 3,0581%
Republican hold Swing
Turnout 209,018100%

2008

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2008: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes 159,69451%
Republican Christopher Shays (incumbent)147,35647%
Libertarian Michael A. Carrano2,0361%
Green Richard Z. Duffee1,3770.44%
Turnout 310,463100%
Democratic gain from Republican Swing

2010

Connecticut 4th congressional district election, 2010: Connecticut District 4
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)115,35153%
Republican Daniel Debicella102,03047%
Turnout 217,381100%
Democratic hold Swing

2012

Connecticut 4th Congressional District Election, 2012
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)174,46160%
Republican Steve Obsitnik117,46340%
Turnout 291,924100%
Democratic hold Swing

2014

Connecticut 4th Congressional District Election, 2014
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)106,87354%
Republican Dan Debicella91,92246%
Turnout 198,800100%
Democratic hold Swing

2016

Connecticut 4th Congressional District Election, 2016
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)185,92860%
Republican John Shaban123,63040%
Turnout 309,558100%
Democratic hold Swing

2018

Connecticut 4th Congressional District Election, 2018
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)168,72661%
Republican Harry Arora106,92138%
Turnout 275,651100%
Democratic hold Swing

2020

Connecticut 4th Congressional District Election, 2020
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent)223,83262%
Republican Jonathan Riddle130,62736%
Independent Brian Merlen5,6561%
Write-in N/A100%
Turnout 360,125100%
Democratic hold Swing

List of members representing the district

Member
(Residence)
PartyYears of ServiceCong
ress(es)
Electoral history
Thomas T. Whittlesey
(Danbury)
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1837.
.[ data unknown/missing ]
Thomas B. Osborne
(Fairfield)
Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1839.
Re-elected in 1840.
Retired.
Samuel Simons
(Bridgeport)
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1843.
Retired.
Truman Smith.jpg
Truman Smith
(Stamford)
Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1849
29th
30th
Elected in 1845.
Re-elected in 1847.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Thomas B. Butler.jpg
Thomas B. Butler
(Norwalk)
Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1849.
Lost re-election.
OrigenSeymour.jpg
Origen S. Seymour
(Litchfield)
Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1855
32nd
33rd
Elected in 1851.
Re-elected in 1853.
Retired to become judge of the Connecticut Superior Court.
William W. Welch
(Norfolk)
American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1855.
Retired.
WilliamDBishop.jpg
William D. Bishop
(Bridgeport)
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th Elected in 1857.
Lost re-election.
Orris S. Ferry - Brady-Handy.jpg
Orris S. Ferry
(Norwalk)
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
36th Elected in 1859.
Lost re-election.
GeorgeCWoodruff.jpg
George C. Woodruff
(Litchfield)
Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th Elected in 1861.
Lost re-election.
JohnHenryHubbard.jpg
John Henry Hubbard
(Litchfield)
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
38th
39th
Elected in 1863.
Re-elected in 1865.
Lost re-election.
William Henry Barnum - Brady-Handy.jpg
William Henry Barnum
(Lime Rock)
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
May 18, 1876
40th
41st
42nd
43rd
44th
Elected in 1867.
Re-elected in 1869.
Re-elected in 1871.
Re-elected in 1873.
Re-elected in 1875.
Resigned when elected U.S. senator.
VacantMay 18, 1876 –
November 7, 1876
44th
Levi Warner.jpg
Levi Warner
(Norwalk)
Democratic November 7, 1876 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected to finish Barnum's term.
Also elected to the next term in 1876.
Retired.
Frederick Miles.jpg
Frederick Miles
(Salisbury)
Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
46th
47th
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Retired.
Edward Woodruff Seymour (Connecticut Congressman).jpg
Edward Woodruff Seymour
(Litchfield)
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Retired.
MilesTGranger.jpg
Miles T. Granger
(North Canaan)
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
Retired.
Frederick Miles.jpg
Frederick Miles
(Salisbury)
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st Elected in 1888.
Lost re-election.
RobertEDeForest.jpg
Robert E. De Forest
(Bridgeport)
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
52nd
53rd
Elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Lost re-election.
Ebenezer J. Hill.jpg
Ebenezer J. Hill
(Norwalk)
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1913
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Lost re-election.
Jeremiah Donovan.jpg
Jeremiah Donovan
(Norwalk)
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
Lost re-election.
Ebenezer J. Hill.jpg
Ebenezer J. Hill
(Norwalk)
Republican March 4, 1915 –
September 27, 1917
64th
65th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Died.
VacantSeptember 27, 1917 –
November 6, 1917
65th
SchuylerMerritt.jpg
Schuyler Merritt
(Stamford)
Republican November 6, 1917 –
March 3, 1931
65th
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected to finish Hill's term.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Lost re-election.
William L. Tierney
(Greenwich)
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
72nd Elected in 1930.
Lost re-election.
SchuylerMerritt.jpg
Schuyler Merritt
(Stamford)
Republican March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1937
73rd
74th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Lost re-election.
Alfred Noroton Phillips.jpg
Alfred N. Phillips
(Stamford)
Democratic January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1939
75th Elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
Albert E. Austin
(Greenwich)
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1941
76th Elected in 1938.
Lost re-election.
Le Roy D. Downs, 1934.jpg
Le Roy D. Downs
(Norwalk)
Democratic January 3, 1941 –
January 3, 1943
77th Elected in 1940.
Lost re-election.
Clare Boothe Luce (R-CT).jpg
Clare Boothe Luce
(Greenwich)
Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1947
78th
79th
Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Retired.
John Davis Lodge.jpg
John Davis Lodge
(Westport)
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1951
80th
81st
Elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Retired to run for Governor of Connecticut.
Albert Morano.jpg
Albert P. Morano
(Greenwich)
Republican January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1959
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Lost re-election.
Donald J. Irwin.jpg
Donald J. Irwin
(Norwalk)
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
86th Elected in 1958.
Lost re-election.
Abner W. Sibal.jpg
Abner W. Sibal
(Norwalk)
Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1965
87th
88th
Elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Lost re-election.
Donald J. Irwin.jpg
Donald J. Irwin
(Norwalk)
Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1969
89th
90th
Elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Lost re-election.
Lowell Weicker.jpg
Lowell Weicker
(Greenwich)
Republican January 3, 1969 –
January 3, 1971
91st Elected in 1968.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Stewart McKinney.jpg
Stewart McKinney
(Fairfield)
Republican January 3, 1971 –
May 7, 1987
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
Elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Died.
VacantMay 7, 1987 –
August 18, 1987
100th
Chris Shays official photo.jpg
Christopher Shays
(Bridgeport)
Republican August 18, 1987 –
January 3, 2009
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
Elected to finish McKinney's term.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Lost re-election.
Jim Himes Official Portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Jim Himes
(Cos Cob)
Democratic January 3, 2009 –
Present
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.

Historical district boundaries

2003-2013 CT 4th Congressional District.png
2003–2013

See also

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References

Notes
  1. "My Congressional District".
  2. 1 2 "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  3. "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 30, 2012" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 23, 2006. Retrieved October 30, 2012.
Bibliography

Coordinates: 41°11′49″N73°23′19″W / 41.19694°N 73.38861°W / 41.19694; -73.38861