Constance of Castile

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Constance of Castile
Constance Castile odLouise7.jpg
Queen consort of France
Tenure1154 – 4 October 1160
Born1136–1140
Died4 October 1160
Burial
Spouse
Issue Margaret, Queen of England and Hungary
Alys, Countess of the Vexin
House Castilian House of Ivrea
Father Alfonso VII of León and Castile
Mother Berenguela of Barcelona
Religion Roman Catholicism

Constance of Castile (1136 or 1140 - 4 October 1160) [1] was Queen of France as the second wife of Louis VII, who married her following the annulment of his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine. [2] She was a daughter of Alfonso VII of León and Berengaria of Barcelona, [3] but her year of birth is not known.

Contents

Life

The official reason for her husband's annulment from Eleanor of Aquitaine had been that he was too close a relative of Eleanor for the marriage to be legal by Church standards; however, he was even more closely related to Constance.

Constance died giving birth to her second child. Desperate for a son, her husband remarried a mere five weeks after her death.

Constance was buried in the Basilica of Saint-Denis, France.

Children

Constance had two children:

  1. Margaret, 1157–1197, who married first Henry the Young King of England, [4] and then Béla III of Hungary [5]
  2. Alys, 1160–1220, who married William IV of Ponthieu [6]

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References

  1. Deslot, Thierry (1996). Impératrices et Reines de France [Empresses and Queens of France] (in French). Paris: Les Editions La Bruyère. ISBN   2-84014-279-1.
  2. Bouchard 2001, p. 126.
  3. Bradbury 2007, p. 165.
  4. Warren 1978, p. 90.
  5. Jaritz & Szende 2016, p. 84.
  6. Warren 1978, p. 26.

Sources

French royalty
Preceded by
Eleanor of Aquitaine
Queen of France
11541160
Succeeded by
Adele of Champagne