Convention Between Great Britain and China Respecting Tibet

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Long name:
  • Convention Between Great Britain and China Respecting Tibet
Signed27 April 1906
Location Beijing, Qing Empire

The Convention Between Great Britain and China Respecting Tibet (Chinese :中英續訂藏印條約) was a treaty signed between the Qing dynasty and the British Empire in 1906, which reaffirmed the Chinese possession of Tibet after the British expedition to Tibet in 1903–1904. The British agreed not to annex or interfere in Tibet in return for indemnity from the Chinese government, while China engaged "not to permit any other foreign state to interfere with the territory or internal administration of Tibet". [1] [2] [3]

Contents

This Convention succeeded the Treaty of Lhasa signed between Tibet and the British Empire in 1904.

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References

  1. Joseph, Askew (14 September 2020). "The Status of Tibet in the Diplomacy of China, Britain, the United States and India, 1911 - 1959" (PDF). Adelaide University - History Centre for Asian Studies. p. 21.
  2. "Tibet profile - Timeline". BBC News. 2014-11-13. Retrieved 2020-09-13.
  3. "CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Tibet". www.newadvent.org. Retrieved 2020-09-13.