Copahue

Last updated
Copahue
Astronaut Photography of Earth - Quick View - Copahue Volcano.PNG
Copahue Volcano photographed from space
Highest point
Elevation 2,997 m (9,833 ft) [1]
Coordinates 37°51′S71°10′W / 37.850°S 71.167°W / -37.850; -71.167 Coordinates: 37°51′S71°10′W / 37.850°S 71.167°W / -37.850; -71.167 [1]
Geography
Relief Map of Chile.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Copahue
Argentina-Chile
Location Neuquén Province,
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Bío Bío Region,
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Stratovolcano
Last eruption January 6, 2016 [1]

Copahue (Spanish pronunciation:  [koˈpawe] ) is a stratovolcano in the Andes on the border of Bío Bío Region, Chile and Neuquén Province, Argentina. There are nine volcanic craters along a 2 km (1.2 mi) line, the easternmost of which is historically the most active, and contains a 300 m (1000 ft) wide crater lake with a pH ranging between 0.18 and 0.30. [2] Eruptions from this crater lake have ejected pyroclastic rocks and chilled liquid sulfur fragments. [1] Although the lake emptied during the 2000 eruption, it later returned to its previous levels. Copahue means "sulphur waters" in Mapuche. [3]

Contents

Copahue sits on a basement of sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Eocene to Pliocene. [2] The modern volcano sits in a volcanically active area, with a caldera from the Pliocene, measuring 20 km by 15 km, lying to the east of Copahue. The modern volcano became active roughly 1.2 million years ago (Ma). [2] The modern caldera formed 0.6 to 0.4 Ma, and produced large pyroclastic flows, extending up to 37 km from the volcano. [2]

Satellite image of the December 2012 eruption Eruption of Copahue Volcano, Argentina-Chile 12-22-2012.PNG
Satellite image of the December 2012 eruption

The modern structure is an elongated shield volcano, with a maximum thickness of 22 km and a minimum of 8 km. [2] It has erupted ten times since 1900, most recently in March 2016. [1] [3] [4] On 27 May 2013, it was reported that a red alert had been issued and the evacuation of around 2,000 people was to begin. [5]

Copahue Crater Lake. CopahueCraterLake.jpg
Copahue Crater Lake.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "Copahue". Global Volcanism Program . Smithsonian Institution . Retrieved 2005-02-11.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Naranjo, Jose; Polanco, Edmundo (2004). "The 2000 AD eruption of Copahue Volcano, Southern Andes". Revista Geológica de Chile. 31 (2): 279–292.
  3. 1 2 "Chile and Argentina on alert over Copahue volcano eruption". BBC News. 23 December 2012.
  4. "Red Alert Issued For Chile Volcano". Sky News. 27 May 2013.

Bibliography