Corrigan Park

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Corrigan Park
Pairc Uí Chorragáin
GreaterBelfastTemplate.gif
Red pog.svg
Corrigan Park
Location within Greater Belfast
AddressWhiterock Road, Belfast
LocationIreland
Coordinates 54°35′33″N5°58′39″W / 54.592369°N 5.977364°W / 54.592369; -5.977364 Coordinates: 54°35′33″N5°58′39″W / 54.592369°N 5.977364°W / 54.592369; -5.977364
Owner St John's GAC
Capacity 5,000
Construction
Broke ground1926
Opened1927
Renovated2001

Corrigan Park is a Gaelic games ground on the Whiterock Road in West Belfast that served as the main venue for GAA in Belfast until the opening of Casement Park in 1953. It is named in honour of Sean Corrigan, mentor of the Brian Óg club who were Antrim's first hurling champions. It is designated as a ground with a capacity of 5,000 by Belfast City Council. [1]

Gaelic games Set of sports originating, and mainly played, on the island of Ireland

Gaelic games are sports played in Ireland under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). Gaelic football and hurling are the two main games. Other games organised by the GAA include Gaelic handball and rounders.

Casement Park

Casement Park is the principal GAA stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and serves as the home ground of the Antrim football and hurling teams. It is located in Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916). As of 2015 it had an official capacity of 32,282, with safety certification for 31,661, including 6,962 seated. It is currently closed and in a state of dereliction.

Antrim GAA Gaelic games administrators for Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland

The Antrim County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association or Antrim GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Antrim. The county board is also responsible for the Antrim inter-county teams.

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Current

It is home to St John's GAC. It regularly hosts Ulster club [2] and colleges matches at second [3] and third [4] level.

St. Johns GAA (Belfast)

St. John's GAA is a Gaelic football, hurling and ladies' Gaelic football club in Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

History

Hurling

Corrigan Park was associated with the run of the Antrim hurling team to the final of the 1943 All Ireland championship, Corrigan Park staged the quarter final in which Antrim beat Galway and the semi-final in which Antrim beat Kilkenny, both unexpected results at the time. Its tight, confined space was regarded as being advantageous to the home side in those matches. [5]

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

Galway GAA Irish Gaelic Athletic Association

The Galway County Boards of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Galway GAA are one of the 32 GAA county boards in Ireland; they are responsible for Gaelic games in County Galway, and for the Galway inter-county teams.

Kilkenny GAA

The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. The county board has its head office and main grounds at Nowlan Park and is also responsible for Kilkenny inter-county teams in all codes at all levels. The Kilkenny branch of the Gaelic Athletic Association was founded in 1887.

Football

Among the major football championship matches it staged were the Cavan-Antrim Ulster championship semi-finals of 1930, 1931 and 1949. Its last major provincial football championship match was Antrim v Donegal in the Ulster championship of 1952.

The Cavan County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Cavan GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in Cavan.

Donegal GAA

The Donegal County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Donegal GAA is one of the GAA's 32 county boards in Ireland. It is responsible for Gaelic games in County Donegal. The county board is also responsible for the Donegal inter-county teams. There are currently 40 clubs under the auspices of the Donegal County Board.

However, Corrigan Park hosted Antrim's Round 2 Qualifier defeat to Kildare in the 2019 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. [6]

Kildare GAA Gaelic Athletic Association

The Kildare County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or Kildare GAA, is one of 12 county boards governed by the Leinster provincial council of the GAA in Ireland. The county board regulates Gaelic games in County Kildare and is also responsible for the inter-county teams.

The 2019 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship is the 132nd edition of the GAA's premier inter-county gaelic football tournament since its establishment in 1887.

Camogie

Corrigan Park staged the All Ireland Camogie finals of 1944, 1946, and 1947, two of which were won by Antrim, and also several of Antrim’s semi-finals. It became known as the home of camogie during this period. [7]

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup. The current champions are Cork, who claimed their twenty-eighth title following a victory over Kilkenny in Croke Park, Dublin.

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Breffni Park

Breffni Park, known for sponsorship reasons as Kingspan Breffni, is a GAA stadium in Cavan, Ireland.

Derry GAA

The Derry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Derry GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland. It is responsible for gaelic games in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. The county board is also responsible for the Derry inter-county teams.

Wexford GAA

The Wexford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Wexford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Wexford. The county board is also responsible for the Wexford inter-county teams.

Down GAA

The Down County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Down GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for the administration of Gaelic games in County Down.

Fermanagh GAA

The Fermanagh County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Fermanagh GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland. The county board is also responsible for the Fermanagh inter-county teams.

Wicklow GAA

The Wicklow County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Wicklow GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in County Wicklow. The county board is also responsible for the Wicklow inter-county teams.

The Ulster Council is a Provincial council of the Gaelic Athletic Association sports of hurling, Gaelic football, camogie, and handball in the province of Ulster. The headquarters of the Ulster GAA is based in Armagh City.

2011 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship

The 2011 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship was the 125th edition of the GAA's premier inter-county Gaelic football tournament, played between 31 counties of Ireland, London and New York. The draw for the 2011 championship took place on 7 October 2010. The 2011 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Final took place at Croke Park on 18 September 2011, with Dublin winning their 23rd title.

The 1978 All Ireland Camogie Championship was won by Cork, who beat Dublin by 17 points in the final. It was the last final to be played using the second crossbar.

The 2005 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship—known as the Foras na Gaeilge All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship for sponsorship reasons—was the high point of the 2005 season in the sport of camogie. The championship was won for the 21st time by Cork who defeated Tipperary by a four-point margin in the final and became part of the legendary “rebel treble” of 2005 when Cork won the senior hurling, camogie and ladies’ football titles. The attendance was 14,350.

The 1945 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1945 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim, who defeated Waterford by a six-point margin in the final.

The 1950 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1950 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin who defeated London by a 21-point margin in the final, having already defeated Antrim by a ten-point margin in the home final.

The 1938 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1938 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Dublin, who defeated Cork by a six-point margin in the final.

The 1956 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship was the high point of the 1956 season in Camogie. The championship was won by Antrim who defeated Cork by a four-point margin in the final, having created a major surprise by defeating serial champions Dublin in the semi-final, and interrupting what would otherwise have been a run of 19 championships in a row by Dublin. The championship featured what were reportedly two of the best camogie matches in the history of the game in its 12-a-side phase, the final and the semi-final between Antrim and Dublin.

ODonovan Rossa GAC Belfast

O'Donovan Rossa GAC Belfast is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Belfast, County Antrim. The club is a member of the Antrim GAA and currently fields teams in Hurling, Gaelic football, Camogie and Handball. The club is named after Irish patriot and revolutionary Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa and one of the club founders was Joe McKelvey.

The 2018 All-Ireland Senior Football Championship was the 131st edition of the GAA's premier inter-county Gaelic football competition since its establishment in 1887.

References

  1. Belfast City Council Health & Safety
  2. http://www.independent.ie/sport/mcconville-goals-decisive-430028.html 1998 Oct 12 McConville Goals Decisive]
  3. 1991 Ulster colleges final
  4. Sigerson 2004 Queen's Univ 1-7 Sligo IT report
  5. Corry, Eoghan (2005). Illustrated History of the GAA. Dublin, Ireland: Gill & MacMillan. p. 250.
  6. All-Ireland qualifiers: Antrim crash out to Kildare in second round at Corrigan Park. BBC Sport. 22 June 2019.
  7. The Evolution of the GAA by Donal McAnallen (Ulster Historical Foundation 2009) ISBN   978-1-903688-83-0